Advertising Work by New Yorker Cartoonists, Part 2: William Steig

And now for Part 2 of what will be many parts  of an adwork display by New Yorker cartoonists, all courtesy of   Warren Bernard, indefatigable cartoon collector, and Executive Director of the Small Press Expo, or SPX.   

There are too many ads by William Steig to show in one sitting, so he’ll have to have his own Part 2 and Part 3.

All but one of these Steig ads are in his earlier style, before he went into his fabulous finer line period. The exception is the Nicholson Hacksaw Blade ad from 1966 where you see the style found in his childrens book as well as on his later New Yorker covers. The dates for the other ads: Delco Batteries: 1960; Cheerios: 1950; Kinsey Gin: 1945; Drano: 1948




















One of many interesting New Yorker nuggets I came across while researching my biography of Peter Arno was the feeling at the magazine,  back in the early 1940s, that too many of its artists (Arno being foremost, of course) were feeling emboldened by their successes in the advertising world and not as beholden to The New Yorker for their livelihood. Harold Ross, the magazine’s founder and first editor, was, I believe, happier when he was holding all the cards. 

Here’s Mr. Steig’s entry on the Spill’s A-Z:

William Steig (photo above) Born in Brooklyn, NY, Nov.ember 14, 1907, died in Boston, Mass., October 3, 2003. In a New Yorker career that lasted well over half a century and a publishing history that contains more than a cart load of books, both children’s and otherwise, it’s impossible to sum up Steig’s influence here on Ink Spill. He was among the giants of the New Yorker cartoon world, along with James Thurber, Saul Steinberg, Charles Addams, Helen Hokinson and Peter Arno. Lee Lorenz’s World of William Steig (Artisan, 1998) is an excellent way to begin exploring Steig’s life and work. New Yorker work: 1930 -2003.



Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *