Auction Of Interest: Peter Arno, William Steig, Arnie Levin, Charles Addams, Frank Modell, Charles Saxon, And More

Thanks to Stephen Nadler of Attempted Bloggery for alerting the Spill to the new Swann catalog, which contains an abundance of New Yorker art.  A highlight, shown above, is Peter Arno’s New Yorker cover of April 4, 1964. Here’s what it looked like as the published cover:

Other New Yorker work offered by Charles Addams, William Steig, Charles Barsotti, Arnie Levin, Richard Decker, Frank Modell, James Daugherty (aka “Jimmie-the-Ink”), Heidi Goennel, Garrett Price, Mischa Richter, Charles Saxon, George Price, Theodore Haupt, Arthur Getz, R.O. Blechman and the King of the Gagwriters, Richard McCallister. Empty the piggy bank!

 

 

Kodak’s Cartoon Campaign With Addams, Steig, And George Price; Liza Donnelly In Walt Disney’s Hometown

Kodak’s Cartoon Campaign With Addams, Steig, And George Price

Stephen Nadler’s latest Attempted Bloggery post shows us some wonderful work by three New Yorker cartoon gods: Charles Addams, William Steig and George Price. See all the ads here.

The artists entries on the Spill‘s A-Z:

 

 

 

 

Charles Addams (above) Born in Westfield, New Jersey, January  7, 1912. Died September 29, 1988, New York City. New Yorker work: 1932 – 1988 * the New Yorker has published his work posthumously. One of the giants of The New Yorker’s  stable of artists.  Key cartoon collections: While all of Addams’ collections are worthwhile, here are three that are particular favorites; Homebodies (Simon & Schuster, 1954), The Groaning Board (Simon & Schuster, 1964), Creature Comforts (Simon & Schuster, 1981). In 1991 Knopf published The World of Chas Addams, a retrospective collection. Visit the Addams Foundation website for far more information : http://www.charlesaddams.com/

 

William Steig (photo above) Born in Brooklyn, NY, Nov. 14, 1907, died in Boston, Mass., Oct. 3, 2003. In a New Yorker career that lasted well over half a century and a publishing history that contains more than a cart load of books, both children’s and otherwise, it’s impossible to sum up Steig’s influence here on Ink Spill. He was among the giants of the New Yorker cartoon world, along with James Thurber, Saul Steinberg, Charles Addams, Helen Hokinson and Peter Arno. Lee Lorenz’s World of William Steig (Artisan, 1998) is an excellent way to begin exploring Steig’s life and work. NYer work: 1930 -2003.

George Price (above) Born in Coytesville, New Jersey, June 9, 1901. Died January 12, 1995, Engelwood, New Jersey. New Yorker work: 1929 – 1991. Lee Lorenz, the New Yorker’s former Art/Cartoon editor, called Price one of the magazine’s great stylists (along with Peter Arno, Helen Hokinson, James Thurber, and William Steig. Of the many Price collections here are two favorites:  Browse At Your Own Risk (1977), and The World of George Price: A 55-Year Retrospective (1988)

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Liza Donnelly To Speak In Walt Disney’s Hometown

Ms. Donnelly, who’s work has appeared in The New Yorker since 1982, will speak this week at Toonfest in Marceline, Missouri, Walt Disney’s hometown.

 

 

Chris Weyant Answers Three Questions; Steig’s Divorce Illustrations; Three Cartoonists at Pennsylvania Fest; Cartoon Companion’s Latest Ratings

 Chris Weyant Answers Three Questions

From The Children’s Book Council, September 5, 2018, “Three Questions With Chris Weyant”

Mr. Weyant began contributing his cartoons to The New Yorker in 1998. Link here to his website.

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Steig’s Divorce Illustrations

Thanks to a fave Spill blog, Attempted Bloggery, we’re able to see some great William Steig illustrations that appeared in American Magazine in the early 1940s.

Mr. Steig’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Born in Brooklyn, NY, Nov. 14, 1907, died in Boston, Mass., Oct. 3, 2003. In a New Yorker career that lasted well over half a century and a publishing history that contains more than a cart load of books, both children’s and otherwise, it’s impossible to sum up Steig’s influence here on Ink Spill. He was among the giants of the New Yorker cartoon world, along with James Thurber, Saul Steinberg, Charles Addams, Helen Hokinson and Peter Arno. Lee Lorenz’s World of William Steig (Artisan, 1998) is an excellent way to begin exploring Steig’s life and work. NYer work: 1930 -2003.

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Three Cartoonists at Pennsylvania Festival

Bob Eckstein, Chris Weyant, and David Borchart (above, left to right) will appear at the Milford (Pa.) Festival on September 30th.  Read all about it here.

Their work appears in the upcoming anthology, “The Ultimate Cartoon Book of Book Cartoons by the World’s Greatest Cartoonists” a collection edited by Mr. Eckstein. Due out, March, 2019.

Mr. Eckstein’s latest book is The Illustrated History of the Snowman (Globe Pequot Press). Out now!

Also out is Eraser (Two Lions),by Anna Kang, illustrated by Mr. Weyant.

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Cartoon Companion’s Latest Ratings

Everybody’s got an opinion, but only two folks (“Max” & “Simon”) devote blog space on a regular basis to sizing up every cartoon in each issue of The New Yorker. Read here.

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue of June 18, 1984

As mentioned here last week, it’s double issue time again. We’re halfway though it now ; only a week til the new issue (dated June 18, 2018) appears online early Monday morning. Just for fun I thought I’d go back to another June 18th issue — the one from 1984. 

Here’s the cover, by Susan Davis, who contributed fifteen covers to the magazine from 1983 – 1992.

 

And here are the cartoonists in that issue:

A number of New Yorker cartoon gods in that lineup. And, as you might expect, some cartoonists  contributing to the magazine then who still contribute now. On the downside, a number of colleagues who’ve passed on: George Price, James Stevenson, William Steig, Stan Hunt, J. B. Handelsman, Steinberg, Bernie Schoenbaum, Frank Modell, Barney Tobey, Ed Arno, Mischa Richter, Ed Fisher, Eldon Dedini, and Robert Weber.

A quick tour through the issue: Ed Frascino has a very funny cartoon name-checking Indiana Jones; Lee Lorenz ( the art editor at the time) puts the word “glitz” to excellent use; a half page George Price cartoon centered on the Year of the Rat; a beautiful full page Saxon drawing about the Museum of Modern Art; a four part Stevenson spread across two pages. He animates television antenna; a titled Steig: “Eastbound Traffic.” Great drawing!;  Stan Hunt’s drawing is one of those cartoons that could’ve run anytime in the previous thirty years (previous to 1984, that is) — a boiler plate kind of cartoon; “Bud” Handelsman gives us a heaven-based piece; a Roz Chast drawing split into four boxes. It could’ve run this year; an Ed Koren drawing that just is so like butter — drawing and caption;  Steinberg provides an illustration for a Profile piece by E.J. Kahn, Jr.; opposite Steinberg is a Bernie Schoenbaum cocktail party drawing — a scenario employed by nearly every cartoonist back then; a Frank Modell drawing with his signature people — love his grumpy husband; an Arnie Levin caterpillar/butterfly drawing — that that loose Levin line is so great; a Barney Tobey drawing set in another favorite situation: the boardroom; a great Warren Miller drawing:

 Following Mr. Miller’s cartoon is an Ed Arno drawing — that fine controlled line of his! Immediately identifiable; a Mischa Richter dog at a desk drawing; Ed Fisher gives us a weather bureau drawing with lots of fun detail; Eldon Dedini’s cartoon of two guys at a bar with a caption that could run today:Everything’s a trap if you’re not careful.”;  next up, a cartoon that made me laugh out loud, by the great cartoonist, Robert Weber:

Next, a beautiful Sempe drawing (is there any other kind?); and last, a Sidney Harris restaurant drawing. Mr. Harris’s style is his and his alone: an angular line that appears to almost spin out of control, but never does.

So, there it is. A cartoon feast in mid-June, thirty-four years ago. 

 

     

The Tilley Watch Online; More Mischa on Attempted Bloggery

The Daily Cartoons (not 100% Trumpian, but close!) were handled this past week by the following cartoonists: Darrin Bell, Ellis Rosen, Emily Flake, Drew Panckeri, and Brendan Loper. 

And over on Daily Shouts, the contributing New Yorker cartoonists were Liana Finck, and a team effort by Jason Adam Katzenstein and Sophia Warren.

All of the above work and more can be found here.

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More Mischa on Attempted Bloggery

Stephen Nadler continues his Mischa Richter fest on Attempted Bloggery.  Mr. Richter is a member the Spill’s K Club  (the club’s 23 member have sold a thousand or more cartoons to The New Yorker). Mr. Richter’s New Yorker career spanned sixty-one years (I believe the cartoonist record-holder is William Steig at seventy-three years).