The Weekend Spill: New Addition To The Spill Library; The Tilley Watch Online; Videos (And An App) Of Interest: Liza Donnelly Exhibit At The Norman Rockwell Museum

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New Addition To The Spill Library

Part of the Spill‘s (self charged) charge is to keep in mind all those cartoonists who have been and are part of The New Yorker, not just the names up in lights. Larry Reynolds, having contributed to several of the biggest magazines of his day (including Collier’s, and The Saturday Evening Post) also had three drawings in The New Yorker.  In the July 1st Spill post I showed you a collection of his ongoing character, Butch, who appeared in Collier’s.  Above is the only other example (to my knowledge) of Reynolds’ work in book form. Lines Of Least Resistance, published in 1941 by E.P. Dutton & company, Inc., contains work from all three of the magazines just mentioned as well as drawings from Elks Magazine.  If my count is correct, there are 24 of his drawings in the book, plus the cover and back cover (3 drawings found in the book).

In the drawing shown above you clearly see a Gluyas Williams influence in his work — old man Kelly and two of the other characters — the men — on the right side of the drawing could’ve been in a Gluyas Williams drawing. The fellow in the forefront right, smoking a pipe, and the man running just below the Pelham sign look similar to George Price’s style (especially the way Reynolds drew the running fellow’s legs).  Other drawings seem to carry a heavy influence of a number of other cartoonists. Look at the one below: shades of Syd Hoff and the early work of William Steig (even, a hint of a Helen Hokinson luncheon lady in the frame). I’m led to wonder if Reynolds ever quite settled on a look of his very own.

Larry Reynolds entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Larry Reynolds (Photo from I Feel Like A Cad, 1944; self portrait above right from Colliers Collects Its Wits, Harcourt Brace & Co., 1941) Born, Mt. Vernon, NY, c. 1912.  Died, March 4, 2002, Barnstable County, Massachusetts. New Yorker work: 3 drawings: Jan 7, 1939 / Feb 24, 1940 / April 6, 1940. Collection of Note: I Feel Like A Cad (drawings from Collier’s Weekly).  Link to Allan Holtz’s Reynold’s Stripper’s Guide Profile here.

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An end of week listing of New Yorker artists* who have contributed to newyorker.com features

July 6 -July 10, 2020

The Daily Cartoon: Yasin Osman, Will Santino, Amy Kurzweil, John Cuneo, Patrick McKelvie, J.A.K.

Video: How To Draw A Child by Emma Allen** & Emily Flake

…and Barry Blitt’s Kvetchbook

*For clarity, the names of artists who have not yet appeared in the print magazine are not bolded.

**Emma Allen is The New Yorker‘s Cartoon Editor

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Videos ( And An App) Of Interest: Liza Donnelly Exhibit At The Norman Rockwell Museum

Here are links to two videos that are part of the Liza Donnelly exhibit at The Norman Rockwell Museum (it opens to the public tomorrow).

This link takes you to a video of Donnelly talking about her live drawing.

And this link takes you to an in depth look at her career.

Also: there’s an app that features Donnelly speaking about individual pieces in the exhibit. See the video about it here.

Personal History: Attended Donnelly’s “virtual art opening” last night, except it wasn’t virtual for me — I was there. Watched as Donnelly (who besides being a colleague, is also my wife) gave a tour, being followed by a cameraman wielding a “live” camera and a photographer documenting the moment (the above photo was not taken by the photographer — it was taken by me with my flip-phone camera as the cartoonist spoke about her sketchbooks in the display case).

For me, the most touching piece on display is also, I believe, the most modest in scale — it may be the smallest piece in the exhibit. It’s the drawing that leaped Ms. Donnelly into The New Yorker;   the first drawing of hers bought, but not the first run. Though OKed (bought) in 1979, it did not run until the issue of November 22, 1982. I believe she speaks about it in the longer video I’ve linked to above.

Go see the exhibit, non-virtually, if you’re up that way. It’s a real treat.

 

 

 

 

The Weekend Spill: A 1934 July 4th Moment By Steig; Bliss’s American Bystander Cover; The Tilley Watch Online, The Week Of June 29th-July 3rd, 2020; More Spills: Eckstein’s Beast Piece, A Hoff Mural, and More Henry Martin

William Steig’s 1934 New Yorker cover celebrating the 4th of July  seems to capture the mood of this particular 4th when we have been urged to stay at home, away from gatherings. It was, of course, published during another deeply troubled time in our history.

Here’s William Steig’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

William Steig Born in Brooklyn, NY, Nov. 14, 1907, died in Boston, Mass., Oct. 3, 2003. In a New Yorker career that lasted well over half a century and a publishing history that contains more than a cart load of books, both children’s and otherwise, it’s impossible to sum up Steig’s influence here on Ink Spill. He was among the giants of the New Yorker cartoon world, along with James Thurber, Saul Steinberg, Charles Addams, Helen Hokinson and Peter Arno. Lee Lorenz’s World of William Steig (Artisan, 1998) is an excellent way to begin exploring Steig’s life and work. New Yorker work: 1930 -2003.

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American Bystander‘s Michael Gerber has released the cover of his next issue (#15 for those keeping track). Cover by Harry Bliss. You can order your copy here. If this issue is anything like the previous 14 it’ll be worth the five bucks (Cheap!).

 Harry Bliss began contributing cartoons and covers to The New Yorker  in January of 1998.  A Wealth Of Pigeon: A Cartoon Collection (a collaboration with Steve Martin) will be out this November.

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The Tilley Watch Online, The Week Of June 29th – July 3rd, 2020

An end of the week listing of New Yorker artists who contributed to newyorker.com features

The Daily Cartoon: Madeline Horwath, Peter Kuper, Julia Suits, Sara Lautman, Akeem Roberts.

Daily Shouts: Amy Kurzweil.

…and Barry Blitt’s Kvetchbook.

To see all of the above, and so much more, go here.

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Bob Eckstein, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2007, has begun writing for The Daily Beast. See his first post here.

…Prompted by a post in the Facebook Vintage Panel And Gag Cartoon Group about a Syd Hoff mural, I checked out this piece from The Orange County Register from July 6, 2007.

…More Henry Martin: it’s so great that Henry Martin is listed on this plaque at the old (but not the oldest!) New Yorker offices at 25 West 43rd Street.

 

The Swann Cartoon Auction Is Back!; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

The Swann Illustration Auction, postponed because of you-know-what, is now on for July 16th. The catalog isn’t online as of this morning, but you can see what’s up for grabs, including original work by some of the masters: Helen Hokinson, Charles Addams, William Steig, Barbara Shermund, Frank Modell (whose Don’t Trust Anyone Over 10 drawing appears here), Edward Sorel, Lee Lorenz, Charles Martin (C.E.M), Gahan Wilson, George Booth (see below), Richard Taylor, and more.  Go here to see for yourself.

(Work by New Yorker artists begins in earnest in the lot #200 range, but there are New Yorker artist pieces sprinkled elsewhere. For instance, if you go to lot #121 you’ll find a non-New Yorker piece by the great Rea Irvin).

Left: original George Booth cover art (published April 19, 1993) Lot #213

 

— My thanks to Stephen Nadler of Attempted Bloggery for passing along word of the auction.

 

 

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Farley Katz on going back out there.

Mr. Katz has been contributing to The New Yorker since

2007. Visit his website here.

The Weekend Spill: When New Yorker Cartoonists Provide Recording Industry Covers; The Tilley Watch Online, May 4th-8th, 2020; Wired Discontinues Buying Cartoons

When New Yorker Cartoonists Provide Recording Industry Covers

When I spotted a story online about Liana Finck providing the cover art for a new single by Ariana Grande & Justin Bieber (above left) it made me think of a few other New Yorker cartoonist covers over time. Most recently there was Ed Steed’s Grammy winning cover for Father John Misty’s Pure Comedy album (above right).

Then there’s Edward Sorel‘s terrif cover art for the cassette release of Jack And The Beanstalk (read by Monty Python’s Michael Palin!).

In the 1990s Roz Chast provided a truckload of covers for a Mad About series.

In 1955, William Steig provided the album cover art for The Duke’s Men (just one of several Steig covers over the years)

And going back 60 years, this classic by Peter Arno for The Pajama Game:

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A weekend list of New Yorker artists who contributed to newyorker.com features throughout the week of May 4th-8th, 2020.

The Daily Cartoon: Hilary Allison, Avi Steinberg, Teresa Burns Parkhurst, Ellis Rosen, Brooke Bourgeois.

 

…and (Pulitzer Prize winnah!) Barry Blitt’s Kvetchbook

All of the above, and more can be found here.

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Wired Discontinues Buying Cartoons

In a May 5th email to cartoonists, the cartoon editor of Wired told contributors that “Wired will no longer be purchasing cartoons” adding, “Wired will be displaying a daily cartoon until their reservoir runs out.”

You can see Wired‘s cartoons here…while supplies last.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Some Robert Weber; From Dick Buchanan’s Vault: New Yorker Cartoonists Work Not in The New Yorker; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Some Robert Weber

From The Art Contrarian, April 6, 2020,  “Robert Weber, New Yorker Cartoonist”

— a brief reminder of the late great Mr. Weber and his work.

Above: one of Mr. Weber’s ten New Yorker covers.

Robert Weber’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Robert Weber (Pictured mid 1980s. Photograph by Liza Donnelly) Born April 22, 1924, Los Angeles, California. Died, October 20, 2016, Branford Connecticut. NYer work: nearly 1500 cartoons, and close to a dozen covers since 1962. Read Ink Spill’s November 2016 Apreciation of Mr. Weber here.

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From Dick Buchanan’s Vault: New Yorker Cartoonists Work Not In The New Yorker

From Mike Lynch’s blog, Dick Buchanan gives us a fun post of work by New Yorker cartoonists that appeared in other publications. Cartoonists include Charles Addams, Whitney Darrow, Jr., Chon Day, Richard Decker, Steinberg, Gahan Wilson, Al Ross, William Steig, Gardner Rea, George Price, Eldon Dedini, Helen Hokinson, Richard Taylor, and Barbara Shermund. Mr. Addams’ drawing in True Magazine, March 1946 shown above.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Brendan Loper on being first.

Mr. Loper began contributing to The New Yorker in 2016. See some more of his work here.