The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of September 24, 2018

The Cover:

Adriane Tomine returns with a cover steeped in dreams. Read about it here. The cover appears related, in color palette and style, to last week’s cover, by Chris Ware. They even share a large circular object hovering along the right side of the frame  (Mr. Ware’s is a tree, Mr. Tomine’s a logo).

The Cartoons:

Two pieces of good news. There are 18 cartoons in the issue. We haven’t seen this many in an issue since May 14th, when there were 19. Perhaps the surge to 18 is a result of this being the “Entertainment Issue” –or maybe it’s just one of those things.

The other piece of good news is that many of the cartoons — more so than in any issue in recent memory —  are given a lot of breathing room on the page. P.C. Vey’s cartoon is a good example, as is Zach Kanin’s, Seth Fleishman’s, Tom Chitty’s, and Barbara Smaller’s. Most of the other cartoons also seem to occupy more space than has been the case; just a few seem squeezed in.

If the Spill was in the business of handing out blue ribbons like they do over on the Cartoon Companion, one would be pinned on Bruce Eric Kaplan’s drawing (p. 61). Also of note: Lars Kenseth’s log flume ride drawing (p.78).

Update:  Sadly, Rea Irvin’s classic masthead (below) is still in mothballs.  Read about it here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Not O.K. Wild West Edition Opens in Idaho

Since its inaugural opening last Fall in Brooklyn, the Not O.K. Exhibit ( consisting of cartoons rejected by The New Yorker *) traveled north to Rye, New York before heading way out west to Mackay, Idaho (shown on the map below, just to get you situated).

Below: some photos from the opening, sent this way by New Yorker cartoonist,  Jeremy Nguyen (shown above on the right under the marquee), who flew out to join opening night festivities with fellow New Yorker cartoonist, Navied Mahdavian, curator of this western edition of the exhibit. He’s the fellow above on the left under the marquee. It should be noted that David Ostow conceived of and curated the original Not O.K. exhibit.

More info / more reading:

*Here’s an explanation of what an O.K. is:

In the New Yorker‘s weekly art meeting, the magazine’s editor, David Remnick, and the magazine’s cartoon editor, Emma Allen, look over and discuss submitted drawings. Mr. Remnick, as the magazine’s editor-in-chief, has the final say on whether a drawing is O.K.ed or rejected. Getting an “O.K.” from the New Yorker (usually via email from Ms. Allen) means that The New Yorker has bought one of your submitted cartoons.

“The New Yorker Said No, But These Cartoons Just May Make Your Day”The New York Times, September 21, 2017.

“Pictures At An Exhibition”Ink Spill, September 23, 2017.

“Rejected Cartoons Get A Second Chance”The Rye City Review, January 25, 2018.

“Not OK: Wild West Edition Brings Failed New Yorker Cartoons To Rural Idaho”Idaho State Journal, August 23, 2018.

Maggie Larson Pencilled; Cartoon Companion Rates This Week’s New Yorker Cartoons

Maggie Larson Pencilled

 Maggie Larson (a fellow Rapidograph user!) is the subject of Jane Mattimoe’s latest Fine Case For Pencils post.  Read it here

Ms. Larson began contributing to The New Yorker in July of last year.

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Cartoon Companion Rates This Week’s New Yorker Cartoons

The CC’s “Max” and “Simon” ( the two folks behind the CC  prefer to remain anonymous) run through the latest New Yorker cartoons, applying a numbered rating.  Read it here.

Kodak’s Cartoon Campaign With Addams, Steig, And George Price; Liza Donnelly In Walt Disney’s Hometown

Kodak’s Cartoon Campaign With Addams, Steig, And George Price

Stephen Nadler’s latest Attempted Bloggery post shows us some wonderful work by three New Yorker cartoon gods: Charles Addams, William Steig and George Price. See all the ads here.

The artists entries on the Spill‘s A-Z:

 

 

 

 

Charles Addams (above) Born in Westfield, New Jersey, January  7, 1912. Died September 29, 1988, New York City. New Yorker work: 1932 – 1988 * the New Yorker has published his work posthumously. One of the giants of The New Yorker’s  stable of artists.  Key cartoon collections: While all of Addams’ collections are worthwhile, here are three that are particular favorites; Homebodies (Simon & Schuster, 1954), The Groaning Board (Simon & Schuster, 1964), Creature Comforts (Simon & Schuster, 1981). In 1991 Knopf published The World of Chas Addams, a retrospective collection. Visit the Addams Foundation website for far more information : http://www.charlesaddams.com/

 

William Steig (photo above) Born in Brooklyn, NY, Nov. 14, 1907, died in Boston, Mass., Oct. 3, 2003. In a New Yorker career that lasted well over half a century and a publishing history that contains more than a cart load of books, both children’s and otherwise, it’s impossible to sum up Steig’s influence here on Ink Spill. He was among the giants of the New Yorker cartoon world, along with James Thurber, Saul Steinberg, Charles Addams, Helen Hokinson and Peter Arno. Lee Lorenz’s World of William Steig (Artisan, 1998) is an excellent way to begin exploring Steig’s life and work. NYer work: 1930 -2003.

George Price (above) Born in Coytesville, New Jersey, June 9, 1901. Died January 12, 1995, Engelwood, New Jersey. New Yorker work: 1929 – 1991. Lee Lorenz, the New Yorker’s former Art/Cartoon editor, called Price one of the magazine’s great stylists (along with Peter Arno, Helen Hokinson, James Thurber, and William Steig. Of the many Price collections here are two favorites:  Browse At Your Own Risk (1977), and The World of George Price: A 55-Year Retrospective (1988)

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Liza Donnelly To Speak In Walt Disney’s Hometown

Ms. Donnelly, who’s work has appeared in The New Yorker since 1982, will speak this week at Toonfest in Marceline, Missouri, Walt Disney’s hometown.