Thurber Thursday; Article Of Interest: Steinberg; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

I came across this block of Thurber stamps while looking through a bag of materials saved from an early 1990s trip to Columbus Ohio.  Liza Donnelly, Roz Chast, Danny Shanahan and yours truly attended an exhibit of cartoons at The Thurber House and gave a talk.

It made me wonder how many other New Yorker cartoonists have been honored with their own stamp.  A quick search turned up a Leo Cullum stamp and several Charles Barsotti stamps from the UK, issued in 1996 (one of the Barsotti’s is shown here)…surely there are more:

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Article Of Interest: Steinberg

From Curbed, April 9, 2020, “Saul Steinberg celebrated the home as a ‘cacoon for creativity'”

Steinberg’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Saul Steinberg Born, June 15, 1914, Ramnic-Sarat, Rumania. Died in 1999. New Yorker work: 1941 – (The New Yorker publishes his work posthumously). Steinberg is one of the giants of The New Yorker.  Go here to visit the saulsteinbergfoundation where you’ll find  much essential information and examples of his work.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

David Sipress gets cartooney with a classic piece of art.

Mr. Sipress began contributing to The New Yorker in 1998.

The Wednesday Watch: Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon; Time Capsule: The New Yorker Issue Of March 21, 1931 Via A New Yorker State Of Mind

Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Mort Gerberg  on Zoom(ing) this day.  In just two days Mr. Gerberg will celebrate the 55th anniversary of his first published New Yorker cartoon, shown below.

Visit his website here.

Mort Gerberg’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Mort Gerberg  Born, March 11, 1931, New York, NY. New Yorker work: April 10, 1965 – . Co-edited, with Ron Wolin & Ed Fisher, The Art in Cartooning: Seventy-five Years of American Magazine Cartoons ( Charles Scribner & Son, 1975). Essential reading… Mort Gerberg On The Scene: A 50-Year Cartoon Chronicle (Fantagraphics, 2019).

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Time Capsule: The New Yorker Issue Of March 21, 1931 Via A New Yorker State Of Mind

A New Yorker State Of Mind: Reading Every Issue Of The New Yorker Magazine   dives deep into the issue of March 21, 1931. Some of the names you’ll run across: Dorothy Parker, E.B. White, FDR, Charles Lindbergh. And cartoons by, among others, Otto Soglow, Mary Petty (and her husband, Alan Dunn), Barbara Shermund, and Helen Hokinson (the cover artist for the issue as well).

 

 

 

Some Robert Weber; From Dick Buchanan’s Vault: New Yorker Cartoonists Work Not in The New Yorker; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Some Robert Weber

From The Art Contrarian, April 6, 2020,  “Robert Weber, New Yorker Cartoonist”

— a brief reminder of the late great Mr. Weber and his work.

Above: one of Mr. Weber’s ten New Yorker covers.

Robert Weber’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Robert Weber (Pictured mid 1980s. Photograph by Liza Donnelly) Born April 22, 1924, Los Angeles, California. Died, October 20, 2016, Branford Connecticut. NYer work: nearly 1500 cartoons, and close to a dozen covers since 1962. Read Ink Spill’s November 2016 Apreciation of Mr. Weber here.

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From Dick Buchanan’s Vault: New Yorker Cartoonists Work Not In The New Yorker

From Mike Lynch’s blog, Dick Buchanan gives us a fun post of work by New Yorker cartoonists that appeared in other publications. Cartoonists include Charles Addams, Whitney Darrow, Jr., Chon Day, Richard Decker, Steinberg, Gahan Wilson, Al Ross, William Steig, Gardner Rea, George Price, Eldon Dedini, Helen Hokinson, Richard Taylor, and Barbara Shermund. Mr. Addams’ drawing in True Magazine, March 1946 shown above.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Brendan Loper on being first.

Mr. Loper began contributing to The New Yorker in 2016. See some more of his work here.

 

 

 

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of April 13, 2020; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

To my readers: This being the time we’re in, the online issue has not yet been posted (as of 11:00am), so what follows is a shortened version of The Monday Tilley Watch. Long-time visitors might recall I prefer first sightings of new cartoons in situ, but in order to provide at least some basic info, I’ve gone to the slideshow (it’s posted here — scroll way down).

The Cover: The last time we saw a Pascal Campion cover (Jan.6, 2020) the Spill pointed out its uncanny resemblance to an Arthur Getz cover from 1965. This week Mr. Campion speaks with The New Yorker‘s art editor, Francoise Mouly, about Mr. Getz’s (and Sempe’s) influence on his work.

 

The Cartoonists:

The Cartoons:

Just as The New Yorker ran a good number of war cartoons during World War II (enough to fill an Album of war cartoons), we are beginning to see a number of corona virus-related cartoons during this particular war. In the latest issue, five of the eleven cartoons are tied-in to the virus, with another few possibly so.

Update after the digital edition was posted: a color strip by Ed Steed is also virus-related.

The Rea Irvin Masthead Talk Masthead Watch:

Without access to the digital edition, I can’t say for sure that Christoph Niemann’s Talk masthead redraw(!) still appears instead of Mr. Irvin’s iconic masthead.  If I had to guess, I’d say the real deal (just below) is still on a shelf, waiting to be dusted off.

Update after the digital edition was posted: the redraw remains…for now.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Jeremy Nguyen on what everyone’s doing again.

Mr. Nguyen began contributing to The New Yorker in

2017. Visit his website here.

 

 

 

 

 

The Weekend Spill: Cartoonists Offer #Cartoonrelief To Those Hit Hardest By Covid-19; The Tilley Watch Online, March 30 – April 3, 2020; Tom Gauld’s Collection Reviewed

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While checking in on a New Yorker cartoonist Slack group a few days ago I noticed a number of my cartoonist colleagues had begun using their art to help those in need during this pandemic. I asked if one of the organizers would explain in detail what they were up to. So here is my New Yorker cartoonist colleague, Amy Kurzweil to tell you about an incredibly worthy effort, #Cartoonrelief:

#Cartoonrelief was born on the New Yorker Cartoonist Slack channel. Navied Mahdavian posted that he’d just bought some photographs from Italian artists raising money for local hospitals, and wanted to know if we cartoonists were interested in selling prints or drawings for a coronavirus cause. I was just about to do something similar on my instagram; a couple times annually I sell prints and originals and give half the proceeds to charity, and this seemed like a moment to up my charitable game. I chose (and often raise money for) Give Directly because their charitable model makes the most sense to me; they give unconditional, direct cash transfers to people living in extreme poverty; they’re highly rated by charity watch orgs because their model means overhead costs are low and decisions about how to spend money are as local as possible. Usually their efforts are global, but right now they have a fund that sends cash to US families hit hardest by COVID-19. 
Other cartoonists jumped on board, and we each made our own choices about what to offer and for how much, given our various constraints at the moment. Avi Steinberg is offering digital portraits, Navied Mahdavian is offering original cartoon drawings, Brendan Loper is offering original cartoon drawings, digital prints, and pet portraits, Sofia Warren is offering originals portraits and original collaborative cartoons, Kendra Allenby is offering signed prints and one-on-one art consultations, Ivan Ehlers is offering prints and custom digital portraits. Neil Dvorak is offering prints, Tom Chitty is drawing robots on horses. Each of our offerings is set at a different price-point, between $25 and $125; people just have to message us the receipt for their donation. I’m offering drawn portraits for $100 and personalized digital cartoon prints for $50. Most people are going for portraits, usually of a loved one: a child they’re quarantining with, a partner they are or aren’t quarantining with, a coworker they’re missing. Although it’s been a lot of work, it’s felt quite meaningful to enter people’s lives momentarily through the act of drawing the people they love. All the responses have been incredibly validating. Here are a few of the portraits I’ve done so far:
And here are some other offerings:
Original Cartoons from Navied:
A collaborative cartoon from Sofia and a donating contributor:
I’ve noticed people have been making much larger donations than I suggest. For example, someone just sent me a receipt for $1000. I think people who can give, want to give, and they appreciate encouragement and validation for doing so. Together we’ve raised $8,000 +… and counting!
If you’d like to join us: Our efforts are unified under the hashtag #cartoonrelief, and any cartoonists can get involved by offering whatever art they can, for a COVID-19 related charitable cause. We’re encouraging of cartoonists and cartoon supporters to propose their own charity or fund they believe is helping with medical or economic relief right now.
If people have any questions about how to get involved, or want to support our efforts, you can reach out to any of the cartoonists mentioned above on Instagram, or email me directly: amykurz@gmail.com 
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A listing of New Yorker artists who contributed to newyorker.com features during the week of March 30 – April 3, 2020.
The Daily Cartoon: Peter Kuper, Shannon Wheeler, Jon Adams, Johnny Dinapoli, Kendra Allenby.
Daily Shouts: Liana Finck, Jason Chatfield (with Ginny Hogan), Avi Steinberg.
…Barry Blitt’s Kvetchbook.
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Tom Gauld’s Cartoon Collection Reviewed
Mr. Gauld is a New Yorker cover artist.