The Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of May 20, 2019; Today’s Daily Cartoonist: Joe Dator

The Cover: It’s the Innovators Issue, hence the use of some headings floating in yellow-orangey color fields, like so:

 

  Let’s hope these color fields aren’t permanent innovations.

On the cover: robots by Tom Gauld.  Read what he has to say about his work here. The cover reminded me ever-so-slightly of Peter Arno’s meeting-of-the-dogs cover from the ancient times. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Cartoonists:

The Cartoons:  Another week with a cartoonist making their print debut (11 out of 19 issues thus far in 2019).  Kasia Babis is the 11th new cartoonist brought into the magazine’s stable this year, and the 37th cartoonist brought in by Emma Allen since she took the cartoon editor reins in May of 2017.

If the Spill handed out blue ribbons like the now dormant Cartoon Companion once did, I’d pin one on Sam Gross’s snail mail cartoon in the issue (p.30).

Rea Irvin:  A fun innovation this issue would’ve been bringing back something in the magazine that never should’ve gone away: Rea Irvin’s classic Talk masthead. But not this week. Anyway, it appears below in its usual Monday Spill spot.  Read about it here.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist/Cartoon

Joe Dator on  fiction and/or/or not fiction.  Visit his website here.

Mr. Dator began contributing to The New Yorker in 2006. 

Note: Mr. Dator, along with several other New Yorker cartoonists (Lars Kenseth and Mort Gerberg among them) will be appearing at this week’s National Cartoonists Society Fest in California. The Daily Cartoonist has all the info here.

 

 

Happy 90th Edward Sorel!; Interview Of Interest: Ken Krimstein; Article Of Interest: Paul Karasik; Today’s Daily Cartoonist: Emily Flake & Yesterday’s: J.A.K.; Cast Recording In The Works For Peter Arno’s Hit B’Way Play, The New Yorkers

The great Edward Sorel celebrated his 90th birthday yesterday.  Mr. Sorel’s first cover for The New Yorker (below) made headlines when Tina Brown selected it as the debut cover of her editorship at the magazine.

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Interview Of Interest: Ken Krimstein

From The Grinnell Magazine, – “I Think Therefore I Draw” — this piece on Ken Krimstein.  Mr. Krimstein began contributing to The New Yorker in 2000.  (this piece found via The Daily Cartoonist)

Link here to Mr. Krimstein’s website.

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From The Vineyard Gazette, “A Brief Sketch Of A Life As A Cartoonist”  — this piece on Paul Karasik, co-author of How To Read Nancy, and New Yorker cartoonist since 1999.

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Today’s Daily Cartoon/Cartoonist…and Yesterday’s

Today’s Daily cartoon, Mueller with a a big pinch of Trump, is by Emily Flake.  Ms. Flake began contributing to The New Yorker in 2008.  Visit her website here.

Yesterday’s Daily, 100% Mitch McConnell,  was by J.A.K. (aka Jason Adam Katzenstein).  Mr. K. began contributing to The New Yorker in 2014. See some of his work here

And speaking of J.A.K., the cover for an upcoming book he’s illustrated has been posted. The White Man’s Guide To White Male Writers of the Western Canon by Dana Schwartz, will be out November 5th, from Harper Perennial.

 

 

 

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Cast Recording In The Works For Peter Arno’s Hit Play, The New Yorkers

From the Never Saw This Comin’ Dept.: Playbill reports that a recording of the music from the  1930 Peter Arno play, The New Yorkers is in the works. The music was written by an up and coming composer, Cole Porter. If you want to know much much more about the play and Arno, there’s always this. Listen here to a 1939 version of “Love For Sale” — the infamous song from the play.

The Tilley Watch, The New Yorker March 18, 2019

The Cover: This is Malika Favre’s seventh cover for The New Yorker (according to the Contributors info on page 4). An exceptionally decorative cover for “The Style Issue”… Read more here

The Cartoonists:

The Cartoons:

A very Charles Addamsy David Sipress drawing this week (that’s a compliment, of course).

Cartoon placement on the page has been mentioned here numerous times: happy to say that seven (i.e., half) of the  cartoons in the issue were given breathing room. They look great.

Tom Cheney’s Hell’s Auditors cartoon especially caught my eye (it’s on page 29). I believe that this is the fourth time New Yorker cartoonists have specifically word-played with the Hell’s Angels “colors.” Jack Ziegler had two, this beauty, published in The New Yorker, February 27, 1989:

And an earlier one, published in The New Yorker, December 17, 1984:

And then there was this one by yours truly in the December 25th, 1995 issue of The New Yorker:

A quick search of The New Yorker‘s database shows over a hundred of its cartoons have incorporated a motorcycle.  Sometimes the bike and biker are bit players, and other times they’re the focus of the drawing.  An awful lot of the cartoons concern folks getting speeding tickets from a motorcycle cop (and many of them show the cop in-wait behind a billboard). 

There are a small number of cartoons with motorcyclists wearing colors, but the usage doesn’t include mention of the Hell’s Angels. Ed Arno’s motorcycle gang wearing jackets that read “Inflation Fighters” (published April 2, 1979) is one example. 

To return to the great Jack Ziegler for a moment, he used the Hell’s Angels colors once again, but left their name intact in this fabulous drawing published in The New Yorker, November 13, 2000:

A long long way from the subject of Hell’s Angels, for those interested in trivia: the first mention of a motorcycle cartoon in the New Yorker‘s database is Al Frueh’s cartoon in the February 13, 1926 issue.  The  second cartoon with a motorcycle in the picture was published December 7, 1929.  It set off a bit of a in-house squabble, but that’s a story for another time (the artist was Peter Arno).

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Lastly, still no sight of Rea Irvin’s classic Talk masthead. Read about it here, and see it below:

 

The New Yorker’s First Football Cover…And A Few More

On this Super Bowl Sunday, thoughts turn to how football has intersected with my favorite magazine’s covers. Closing in on its fourth birthday,The New Yorker had run plenty of sports themed covers (baseball, tennis, horse racing, sculling, hockey…) but not anything football-related until I.G. Haupt‘s cover shown above. This was Mr. Haupt’s third cover for the magazine. He came on like gangbusters following his debut on the magazine’s September 3, 1927 issue — by year’s end, he’d had five. In all, there were forty-four Haupt covers, the last January 21, 1933.

The next football cover, published nearly a year later, was by an up and coming artist, Peter Arno (this was his eighth cover):

Looking through the magazine’s football covers you see a lot of huddles, like the Arno above and this one from the great Abe Birnbaum (which seems like an inspiration for a later cover):

Mr. Birnbaum was also the artist behind this somewhat unusual take from October 1950:

Here’s a great line of scrimmage cover by Harry Brown:

Finally, a personal favorite: this beauty by Alajolov, published in 1939: