The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of May 25, 2020: CBS Sunday Morning’s Mini-Slideshow; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

It’s become (almost) the norm during these strange days, weeks, and months that the online digital edition of The New Yorker is not as yet posted by this time of day (early morning that is). Back in the pre-shutdown days it usually appeared in the wee hours (usually around 3 a.m.). There was even a time before that when it was posted, in a sort of dramatic reveal, at the stroke of midnight.

I’ll post more about the new issue later in the day when I have the online issue in front of me. If possible I like seeing the cartoons as they appear on the magazine’s pages before saying a thing about them. I’ve already seen them this morning as they appear in the slideshow found on this page and, despite what I just said about commenting, have already said something about one of the drawings.

Update: The digital issue was all ready to go this mornin (May 19). A few additions to the Monday Tilley Watch below, as well as some content removed.

The Cover: I had a hunch we’d see a Barry Blitt cover much sooner than later following his Pulitzer…and bingo!

Read the short Q&A with him here about the cover.

The Cartoonists:  I’ve * the two cartoonists who are newbies, Kate Isenberg and Suzy Becker. The two newbies are the seventh and eighth new cartoonists to join the stall this year and the sixtieth and sixty-first to be brought in under Emma Allen’s cartoon editorship that began in May of 2017.

  Ellis Rosen, Liana Finck, Zachary Kanin, P.C. Vey, Edward Koren, Victoria Roberts, Teresa Burns Parkhurst, Navied Mahdavian, Hartley Lin, Tom Toro, Elisabeth McNair, *Kate Isenberg*, Roz Chast, Sofia Warren, Jared Nangle,*Suzy Becker*

The Cartoons:

Really enjoyed Victoria Robert‘s celebrity drawing and caption, as well as Edward Koren‘s family cliff-climbing outing. Lovely drawings. Also catching my eye: Elisabeth McNair‘s fun take on the famous Magritte pipe (This Is Not A Pipe).  and Jared Nangle‘s Jack-In-The-Box.

 

The Rea Irvin Talk Masthead Watch: Mr. Irvin’s classic Talk masthead (below) is still in storage…but hopefully not forever. Read about it here.

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CBS Sunday Morning’s Mini-Slideshow

CBS Sunday Morning ran a mini slideshow of three coronvirus theme New Yorker cartoons on yesterday’s broadcast. Cartoonists responsible for the three drawings: Roz Chast, Victoria Roberts, and Danny Shanahan.

The show has been attentive to New Yorker cartoonists over the years, with several profile pieces, including this one from 2017 and this one from 2009.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon 

Ali Solomon on a facsimile.

Ms. Solomon has been contributing to The New Yorker since November of 2018. See more of her work here.

 

 

 

 

 

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of May 11, 2020: Let Us Now Praise George Booth’s Auto Repair Shop Cartoons

The Cover: The ninth coronavirus-themed cover out of the last ten issues. Here’s a Q&A with cover artist, Christoph Mueller.

From the Dept. of Broken Records: sorry, but do New Yorker covers really need titles? This one would be fine standing all by itself.

The Cartoonists:

Let Us Now Praise George Booth’s Auto Repair Shop Cartoons

In a departure for the Monday Tilley Watch, I’m going to talk about just one of this week’s cartoonists, and his garage-centric drawings. When one thinks of New Yorker car drawings, there are at least two possible candidates that come readily to mind: the late great Joe Mirachi* and the singularly sensational soon-to-be-94 year old George Booth.  As you see in the above list of this week’s contributing cartoonists, Mr. Booth leads off the issue. What a kick to see this cartoon! What fun! The drawing is of a garage mechanic telling a customer, “We found a dangling participle in your carburetor, Professor.”  In Mr. Booth’s fifty-one year history of contributing to The New Yorker, his garage mechanic drawings rank up there with, among others, his guy in the claw-foot bathtub, his cave people and, of course, his dog and cat drawings.

When I think about New Yorker artists who have been with the magazine for some time — Mr. Booth’s first appeared in 1969 — I’m always curious to see when it was that one of their special interests began. With Booth, it didn’t take long at all for his first car mechanic cartoon to appear.  Below is his third New Yorker drawing (it appeared in the issue of March 7, 1970).

I don’t have access to an up-to-the minute accounting of Booth’s New Yorker work, so I’m unable to give an accounting of how many garage mechanic drawings the magazine’s published (if you type in “car” on the magazine’s database in association with George Booth’s name, 65 results are returned. But the database is good only up to February 14, 2005). Here are just a few of Booth’s classic additions to The New Yorker‘s cartoon car canon, beginning with a favorite from January 13, 1973.

 

And from March 25, 1974:

Finally, this beauty from May 27, 1991:

It’s tempting to remark on the detail you see in all of Booth’s repair shop drawings, but heck, detail has been Booth’s middle name throughout his more than eight hundred-and-fifty cartoons published thus far. His love of the scene found inside (and outside) the garage is obvious — all those golden graphic opportunities. We are fortunate Booth finds the elements in and around the shop worthy of pen and ink examination: the mechanics themselves in their well-worn grease-splotched coveralls, and then of course, the puzzled customers and their cars (what great cars!) and the ever-present Booth cats (and/or dogs).

I’ve spent a lot of time waiting in auto repair shops; it’s always a bit of a Boothian experience, looking around, noting the “stuff” — seeing it as Booth sees it. I owe George Booth plenty for his love of capturing the car shop — it clearly inspired my repair shop drawings, and “inspired” is putting it mildly as is clear in the below drawing of mine from The New Yorker issue of December 24, 1984.

Hats and caps off to Booth!

 

* Below: a Joe Mirachi New Yorker car cartoon, published November 24, 1986

 

 

 

 

 

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of September 17, 2018

The cover

If you haven’t already seen the school busses on the road, or the signs posted everywhere advising that school is back in session, Chris Ware’s cover is yet another reminder that it’s back to school time.

The cartoons

Here, for the record, are the contributing cartoonists in the issue:

A quick survey of each drawing: Ms. Suits gives us a cactus drawing (are cactus the new crash test dummies — this being the second cactus drawing out of the past three issues); Mr. Dernavich provides us with an end of summer roller coaster drawing with some unintentional(?) graphic trickery concerning the track itself; Ms. McNair’s couple have neighborly dinner date issues; Farley Katz takes us to a sturdy cartoon scenario of parent reading to a child at bedtime; William Haefeli up next with his trademark drawing style and an excellent caption; an Edward Koren drawing — allowed a wonderful space on the page. Very nice all around!; Ben Schwartz plays with Rodin’s The Thinker; Ed Steed plays around with a clown and a banana peel (and it’s in color); Zach Kanin visits a game of spin the bottle (a scenario we rarely see); Frank Cotham allows us a peek into a room full of sweaty frock-coated gentlemen; Sara Lautman takes us up up and away to the sky god’s territory; Joe Dator’s drawing of a symphony hall is splendid; Kim Warp’s trash-in-the-sea drawing arrives with trash-in-the sea much in the news.  And finally, a nod to the advent of Fall baseball with a meeting at the pitcher’s mound courtesy of Tom Toro.

The issue arrives sans Rea Irvin’s classic masthead. Here it is:

I can’t let mid-September slip by without mentioning the issue of September 11, 1925 (cover by the aforementioned Mr. Irvin).  

New Yorker history buffs will recall that the magazine was nearly put to rest in the Spring of its first year of publication. If not for an overheard remark, the New Yorker would’ve been a magazine that lasted less than half a year. Instead of killing the magazine, it was decided to coast through the summer,  putting renewed energy into the issue of September 12th. You can read about the specifics on content here courtesy of A New Yorker State of Mind.