The Weekend Spill: A Book Of Interest On The Horizon; The Tilley Watch Online, The Week Of April 6-10, 2020

________________________________________________________________ It appears that this long-ago rejected cover painting is going to be a Spill Easter thing. ___________________________________________________________   An Editor’s Burial: Journals and Journalism From The New Yorker and other Magazines, coming our way in July from Penguin/Random House.   This from the publisher: A glimpse of post-war France through the eyes and words of 14 (mostly) expatriate journalists

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Harold Ross’s “R”

The arrival of a New Yorker original here at Spill headquarters is always a “moment.”  Yesterday’s  addition to the Spill collection — an I. Klein original published in the June 19, 1926 issue — instantly became the second oldest New Yorker drawing in the house (the earliest is an Alice Harvey cartoon, published October 25, 1925). Here’s how Mr. Klein’s

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From The Archives: The Humble New Yorker Art Department Office Supply; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon; Today’s Daily Shouts Cartoonist

Here’s a fun oddity: the stamp/envelope moistener that once sat in The New Yorker‘s Art Department at the magazine’s 25 West 43rd Street address. The moistener, sold by Chicago’s Wilson Jones Company, seems have been manufactured in the 1940s. It was in use at The New Yorker until 1991, when the magazine moved south across 43rd Street to modern digs

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Special Screening Of Stevenson Lost And Found For New Yorker Cartoonists; Meet The Artist (1943): Mischa Richter; David Remnick On Ross And Shawn

Special Screening Of Stevenson Lost And Found For New Yorker Cartoonists The Spill has learned there’ll be a special screening for all New Yorker cartoonists next Tuesday of the documentary film, Stevenson Lost And Found. I asked the film’s director, Sally Williams to explain how this came about: The idea for this screening came about from Nathan Fitch who is

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Who, Darrow?

Lately, while rummaging around through my own New Yorker history, I’ve spent a lot of time re-reading what other contributors had to say about the transitional period of Shawn to Gottlieb to Brown to Remnick. There were a number of books,  all published in the late 1990s, early 2000s: Renata Adler’s Gone, Lillian Ross’s Here But Not Here, Ved Mehta’s

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