The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of November 4, 2019

The Cover: Without heading to the Table Of Contents and reading the title for this cover I’m going to guess it’s a comment on city noise. I’ve always felt New Yorker covers should work stand alone, without explanation, or description. This was the practice until Tina Brown’s revamp of the magazine, beginning with the issue of October 5, 1992.

Okay, now to the Table of Contents and the cover’s title: “Noise New York.”

There’s a hint of Steinberg on the cover; the police car beams of flashing lights for instance. Below left, a detail from Steinberg’s March 13, 1978 New Yorker cover, and to the right, a detail from this week’s cover (by Richard McGuire).

 

 

 

 

If you want to read more about Mr. McGuire’s cover, go here.

The Cartoonists:

Some random thoughts on some of the Cartoons & Cartoonists:

So yay! A lot of cartoonists. If we count the two teams (Sofia Warren & J.A.K., and Pia Guerra & Ian Boothby) as one cartoonist per drawing, there are twenty-one contributors.

There’s a newbie: Luke Kruger-Howard, who is the twenty-fourth new member of the magazine’s stable of cartoonists this year and the fiftieth newbie under Emma Allen’s editorship, begun in the Spring of 2017.

There are four bedroom cartoons in the issue: one by Victoria Roberts (page 46), one by the aforementioned Mr. Kruger-Howard (p. 23), one by Will McPhail (p. 36), and one by the aforementioned team of Guerra & Boothby (p. 70). Victoria Roberts’ three little pigs in bed drawing is both funny and touching.  It’s become an instant favorite Roberts cartoon.

Paul Noth has a fine colorful cartoon on page 50.  As mentioned here a number of times, it’s the cartoons that surprise that catch my attention (and often my affection). This is an out-of-left-field drawing that surprises. What more could one ask for.

P.C. Vey specializes in out-of-left-field drawings. His hikers (p. 54) don’t disappoint. I love everything about this drawing, especially the unseen co-hikers’ name (“the Jensons”). Someone ought to frame the original and hang it on a wall.

One can’t see Karl Stevens “Casablanca” drawing (p.39) without recalling others. A quick search on the magazine’s Cartoon Bank turned up five (it’s possible there are more):

Bob Eckstein’s from November 30, 2015

This classic from  Sam Gross, published February 11, 2008

A duo effort by Emily Flake & Rob Kutner, published October 16, 2017 

One by the late great Al Ross, published February 2, 1987.

And this fun one by Julia Suits, published October 30, 2017

 

High on my favorite things to draw are dogs and clouds. It’s only natural then that I’d be partial to a drawing that combines both, such as Amy Hwang’s cartoon on page 31 (her poodles are ever-so-slightly Gahan Wilsonesque).

I can’t see a cloud-based New Yorker drawing — heck, I can’t see clouds — without thinking of Charles Addams’ classic cover of May 19, 1975.

 

Lastly, I appreciate the challenge presented by aerial view drawings such as Sofia Warren & J.A.K’s joint effort on page 28. The last one I recall seeing was this one by David Borchart, published  February 22, 2016.  Then there is this spectacular dizzying cover from Adolph Kronengold, published September 22, 1928.

The Rea Irvin Talk Masthead Watch

Sadly, Mr. Irvin’s iconic Talk masthead drawing (below) remains mothballed. It was replaced by a redraw in 2017 after appearing 92 years.  Read about it here.

 

 

 

The Weekend Spill: A Booth Exhibit; New Blitt’s Kvetchbook Entry; Events Of Interest With Liana Finck; The Tilley Watch Online For August 19-23, 2019

A Booth Exhibit

There’s a brand new George Booth exhibit up and running at Gallery North out on Long Island. All the info here.

George Booth’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

George Booth (photo taken in NYC 2016, courtesy of Liza Donnelly) Born June 28, 1926, Cainesville, MO. New Yorker work: June 14, 1969 – . Key collections: Think Good Thoughts About A Pussycat (Dodd, Mead, 1975), Rehearsal’s Off! (Dodd, Mead, 1976), Omnibooth: The Best of George Booth ( Congdon & Weed, 1984), The Essential George Booth, Compiled and Edited by Lee Lorenz ( Workman, 1998).

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New Blitt’s Kvetchbook Entry

Trump + Golf + Greenland,  courtesy of Mr. Blitt.

See it here.

Mr. Blitt began contributing to The New Yorker in 1993. Visit his website here.

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Events of Interest With Liana Finck

Tis nearing the season for promotional events tied-in to Liana Finck’s upcoming collection, Excuse Me: Cartoons, Complaints, and Notes to Self, due September 24th from Random House Trade Paperbacks. Brooklyn’s Books Are Magic will host an event on October 3rd (scroll down to October 3rd), and The Commonwealth Club (out in San Fran) will hold an event on October 14th.

Ms. Finck began contributing to The New Yorker in 2013. Visit her website here.

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A listing of New Yorker cartoonists who contributed to the Daily Cartoon and/or Daily Shouts during the past week (August 19 -23)

The Daily Cartoon:

Farley Katz, Tim Hamilton (twice), Jeremy Nguyen, and Mark Thompson.

Daily Shouts: “Achievable Ways To Feel Accomplished” by Julia Edelman and Ginny Hogan. Illustrated by Will McPhail; “Larson’s Guide To Odd Birds Of New York City” by Maggie Larson.

All these and more can be found here.

A Non-Chas Addams Drawn Addams Family Comic Book This Fall; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon; McPhail’s Graphic Review

From IDW, news of a one-shot Addams Family comic book this fall. Read about it here on Newsarama (includes the IDW press release).

 Worth noting that the drawings in this upcoming comic book will look like the ones above left, not the ones on the right, drawn by Addams.

Mr. Addams entry on the Spill’s A-Z:

Charles Addams (Born in Westfield, New Jersey, January  7, 1912. Died September 29, 1988, New York City. New Yorker work: 1932 – 1988 * the New Yorker has published his work posthumously. One of the giants of The New Yorker’s  stable of artists.  Key cartoon collections: While all of Addams’ collections are worthwhile, here are three that are particular favorites; Homebodies (Simon & Schuster, 1954), The Groaning Board (Simon & Schuster, 1964), Creature Comforts (Simon & Schuster, 1981). In 1991 Knopf published The World of Chas Addams, a retrospective collection. Visit the Addams Foundation website for far more information : http://www.charlesaddams.com/

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

A fly, a frog, and airspace, by Lars Kenseth, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2016. Visit his website here.

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Will McPhail’s Graphic Review

From The New York Times, July 19, 2019, “A Recipe For ‘Heartburn'”

— Will McPhail’s graphic review of Nora Ephron’s Heartburn. Mr. McPhail began contributing to The New Yorker in 2014.  Visit his website here.

 

 

 

 

Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon; McPhail’s Graphic Novel; Liza Donnelly Illustrates A Carole King Announcement

Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Teresa Burns Parkhurst (a New Yorker cartoonist since 2017) on Pets and 4th Of July Booms. 

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Will McPhail’s Graphic Novel

From The Bookseller, July 3, 2019, “Sceptre Wins Three-Publisher Auction For New Yorker Cartoonist’s Debut” — Will McPhail (shown above)  has been signed to deliver a graphic novel in 2021. Read about it here.

Mr. McPhail began contributing to The New Yorker in 2014.

 

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Liza Donnelly Illustrates A Carole King Announcement

On Twitter @carole_king, this Liza Donnelly drawing via Carole King clarifying that her concert in D.C. on the 4th is not associated with the Trump tank show the same day. A Deadline Hollywood piece here about it.

Ms. Donnelly began contributing to The New Yorker in 1982.

Two Peacocks Walk Into A Room; Rare Book Of Interest: A John M. Price Cartoon Anthology: Sara Lautman’s Daily Shouts; Today’s Daily Cartoonist: Avi Steinberg

In one of those million-to-one cartoon moments, both my colleague Harry Bliss (with his collaborator Steve Martin) and I have similar drawings out this week (his in his syndicated daily spot, and mine in The New Yorker). What’s unusual, besides the timing of publication, and the peacock standing in a doorway in both drawings, is the use of the peacock itself. A quick visit to the New Yorker‘s Cartoon Bank site turned up peacock drawings by a dozen artists. I have to think there were a number more in the magazine’s ninety-four years (the Cartoon Bank site does not provide every cartoon in the magazine’s archive). The listed peacock drawings are by: Mick Stevens, Sam Gross, Will McPhail, John O’Brien, George Booth, Bernard Schoenbaum, George Price, Edward Koren, Saul Steinberg (he has three), Robert Day, Mort Gerberg, and Victoria Roberts. There were also three peacock covers shown. The artists:  Joseph Low (the peacock is a minor character in his cover), Steinberg, and the one-and-only Rea Irvin. 

I asked Mr. Bliss if he’d like to comment on our dual peacock drawings, and here’s what he had to say:

That’s crazy! I didn’t get my new issue of The New Yorker yet, so I didn’t even know that was in there.  When I initially did my drawing, from an idea given to me by Steve Martin, I think I mentioned to Emma [Emma Allen, The New Yorker‘s cartoon editor] that I wanted it to be in color. Seeing yours now, makes me wonder if they bought yours before they had seen mine and the reason they didn’t buy mine and Steve’s is because they had already bought yours… Similars? Anyway, I think the reason there aren’t that many peacock cartoons out there is because the damn thing is so hard to draw!

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Rare Book Of Interest: A John M. Price Anthology

Warren Bernard (of SPX fame) has alerted the Spill to another rarity: a cartoon collection of work by John M. Price who contributed four drawings to the magazine (Mr. Bernard tells me that three of Mr. Price’s four New Yorker drawings appear in the collection). Here’s Price’s rather skimpy bio on the A-Z (if anyone out there has more info please send this way):

John M. Price Born  (Pennsylvania?) February 5, 1918, died January 19, 2009, Radnor, Pennsylvania. New Yorker work: February 17, 1940, March 9, 1940, June 8, 1941, and August 30, 1941. His work appeared in many publications, including The Saturday Evening Post, Esquire, The Country Gentleman, and Colliers. Key collection (self published) Don’t Get Polite with Me.

*Chris Wheeler’s fabulous site also has a scan of Price’s book (including the back cover), but I have to admit the cover never registered in my brain’s cartoon catalog. Now, having registered it, the book becomes a must-have for the Spill‘s library.  

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A Daily Shouts By…

Sara Lautman, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2016, contributed yesterday’s Daily Shouts.

 

 

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist/Cartoon

 

An Avi Steinberg summer vacation/global warming cartoon. Mr. Steinberg began contributing to The New Yorker in 2012.  More about him here on Jane Mattimoe’s Case For Pencils.