Tuesday Tilley: Books On The Horizon From Eckstein, Bliss & Martin, McPhail, Crumb

Here are a few books from New Yorker artists heading our way, some sooner than later:

 

All’s Fair In Love And War: The Ultimate Cartoon Book, edited by Bob Eckstein, and featuring a cast of thousands (well actually 39 cartoonists). Princeton Architectural Press. Out October 20, 2020. The third title in the Ultimate Cartoon Book series edited by Mr. Eckstein, a New Yorker contributor since 2007. (*full disclosure: my work appears in the book).

A Wealth Of Pigeons: A Cartoon Collection, by Harry Bliss & Steve Martin. Celadon Books. Out November 17, 2020. Mr. Bliss (drawing) and Mr. Martin (writing) have been teaming up as of late. This’ll showcase the fruits of their labor. Mr. Bliss began contributing to The New Yorker in 1994.

In: A Graphic Novel, by Will McPhail, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. Out in May of 2021. Mr. McPhail began contributing to The New Yorker in 2014. From the publisher:

“Nick, a young illustrator, can’t shake the feeling that there is some hidden realm of human interaction beyond his reach.”

Crumb’s World, by Robert Crumb. David Zwirner Books. Out January 19, 2021.  Mr. Crumb began contributing to The New Yorker in 1994. From the publisher:

“… a slice of Crumb’s unique universe, this book features a wide array of printed matter culled from the artist’s five-decade career—tear sheets of drawings and comics taken directly from the publications where the works first appeared, magazine and album covers, broadsides from the 1960s and 1970s, tabloids from San Francisco’s Haight-Ashbury, Oakland, Manhattan’s Lower East Side, and other counterculture enclaves, as well as exhibition ephemera.”

 

 

 

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of May 11, 2020: Let Us Now Praise George Booth’s Auto Repair Shop Cartoons

The Cover: The ninth coronavirus-themed cover out of the last ten issues. Here’s a Q&A with cover artist, Christoph Mueller.

From the Dept. of Broken Records: sorry, but do New Yorker covers really need titles? This one would be fine standing all by itself.

The Cartoonists:

Let Us Now Praise George Booth’s Auto Repair Shop Cartoons

In a departure for the Monday Tilley Watch, I’m going to talk about just one of this week’s cartoonists, and his garage-centric drawings. When one thinks of New Yorker car drawings, there are at least two possible candidates that come readily to mind: the late great Joe Mirachi* and the singularly sensational soon-to-be-94 year old George Booth.  As you see in the above list of this week’s contributing cartoonists, Mr. Booth leads off the issue. What a kick to see this cartoon! What fun! The drawing is of a garage mechanic telling a customer, “We found a dangling participle in your carburetor, Professor.”  In Mr. Booth’s fifty-one year history of contributing to The New Yorker, his garage mechanic drawings rank up there with, among others, his guy in the claw-foot bathtub, his cave people and, of course, his dog and cat drawings.

When I think about New Yorker artists who have been with the magazine for some time — Mr. Booth’s first appeared in 1969 — I’m always curious to see when it was that one of their special interests began. With Booth, it didn’t take long at all for his first car mechanic cartoon to appear.  Below is his third New Yorker drawing (it appeared in the issue of March 7, 1970).

I don’t have access to an up-to-the minute accounting of Booth’s New Yorker work, so I’m unable to give an accounting of how many garage mechanic drawings the magazine’s published (if you type in “car” on the magazine’s database in association with George Booth’s name, 65 results are returned. But the database is good only up to February 14, 2005). Here are just a few of Booth’s classic additions to The New Yorker‘s cartoon car canon, beginning with a favorite from January 13, 1973.

 

And from March 25, 1974:

Finally, this beauty from May 27, 1991:

It’s tempting to remark on the detail you see in all of Booth’s repair shop drawings, but heck, detail has been Booth’s middle name throughout his more than eight hundred-and-fifty cartoons published thus far. His love of the scene found inside (and outside) the garage is obvious — all those golden graphic opportunities. We are fortunate Booth finds the elements in and around the shop worthy of pen and ink examination: the mechanics themselves in their well-worn grease-splotched coveralls, and then of course, the puzzled customers and their cars (what great cars!) and the ever-present Booth cats (and/or dogs).

I’ve spent a lot of time waiting in auto repair shops; it’s always a bit of a Boothian experience, looking around, noting the “stuff” — seeing it as Booth sees it. I owe George Booth plenty for his love of capturing the car shop — it clearly inspired my repair shop drawings, and “inspired” is putting it mildly as is clear in the below drawing of mine from The New Yorker issue of December 24, 1984.

Hats and caps off to Booth!

 

* Below: a Joe Mirachi New Yorker car cartoon, published November 24, 1986

 

 

 

 

 

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of April 20, 2020

A Note To Readers: Due to the times we’re in the digital edition of the magazine appears later in the day than usual. Thus, instead of the usual look through the magazine, I’m working off of the slide show of cartoons on newyorker.com, as well as the cover Q&A found there. If any mistakes are made on my part I’ll correct them once the digital issue is posted.

Update: 1:00pm.  Digital issue posted about an hour ago.

The Cover: Owen Smith gives us a tired worker (the piece is titled — and again, why do we need cover titles? —  “After The Shift”)…four out of the last five covers have been corona virus themed. Read about the cover here.

The Cartoonists:

The Cartoons:

I don’t know how others respond to an issue’s cartoons. For me, it’s always at least a two-level response:

1. How each drawing hits me — did a drawing stand out (for better or worse).

2. The feeling from all the drawings combined: was it a strong issue of work, or not.

This new issue feels strong, covering a wide range of territory in cartoonland, from aliens (courtesy of Charlie Hankin) to a PC Satyr (from Edward Koren), from dolphins in a swimming pool (McPhail), to what might be found on the other side of the mountaintop (Colin Tom)… and so much more.

 

The Rea Irvin Masthead Watch:

Rea Irvin, the fellow shown here, did so much to shape the look of The New Yorker (okay, I’ll say it — he was instrumental). One of his greatest lasting contributions was adapting Allen Lewis’s typeface; it eventually became known as the Irvin typeface, although these days I hear it   referred to as the New Yorker typeface.  Among Irvin’s many contributions other than art supervisor to Harold Ross (in itself a huge contribution!) was contributing covers, including, of course, the very first one, featuring Eustace Tilley. He also contributed cartoons, and headings for various departments. His design for Talk Of The Town stood in place (with a few adjustments in the magazine’s earliest days) for 92 years, until May of 2017 when his iconic design was mothballed and replaced by a redraw.

Am I wrong to think of Irvin’s typeface, his Tilley, his Talk masthead, and his “catholic” taste in cartoon selection as representing the graphic soul of the magazine?  So many modern changes (or “tweaks” as they were referred to) were test ballooned in recent years and then withdrawn (layout, typography, headings, etc., etc.) —  why not bring back this not insignificant bit of soul.

 

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of March 16, 2020

The Cover: Talk about yer timely cover: you might think that the cover on the left, by I. G. Haupt, is this week’s New Yorker cover, but it’s not. It appeared August 31, 1929*, not too long before “Black Monday”; the cover on the right appears this week on the magazine — “The Spring & Style” Issue. I’m reminded of The Rolling Stones song, Dandelion, and its catchy “Blow away dandelion, blow away dandelion.”

*Oddly, the Aug.29, 1929 issue is not included in the magazine’s digital archive available to subscribers. If you go to the archive, and look through the 1929 issues you’ll see there’s a gap between the issue of August 24, 1929 (Helen Hokinson cover) and September 7, 1929 (Sue Williams cover). Luckily, I have a copy, but what if you don’t.

The Cartoonists:

As with the other week, I’m showing the entire list of Artists as the Spots artist is Benoit van Innis who has provided a number of splendid covers over the years.

The Cartoons:

A truly wonderful drawing in this issue by Ed Steed (it’s on page 46), and a very clever idea by Will McPhail on page 38. Other drawings that caught my eye: P.C. Vey’s what’s under the bed cartoon (page 36), Drew Panckeri’s lion in a barber shop (p. 69), and Liana Finck’s fitbit drawing (p.66).

 

The Rea Irvin Talk Masthead Watch:

The above has not been seen in The New Yorker since May of 2017.  Read about it here.

 

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of December 9, 2019; Terry Gross’s 1986 Gahan Wilson Interview; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Ink Spill experienced technical issues for much of the past twelve hours and thus the Monday Tilley Watch will be abbreviated today. Apologies!

The Cover: from Tom Gauld, a starry starry night black & blue paneled cover. Read a Q&A with him here about it.

The Cartoonists & Cartoons:

Two newbies in this issue: Jared Nangle and Mo Welch. They are the 25th and 26th new New Yorker cartoonists of the year, and the 51st and 52nd new cartoonists brought in under the cartoon editorship of Emma Allen since she took the cartoon department reins in the Spring of 2017.

One question: as I zipped through the issue I wondered if Will McPhail‘s use of The New Yorker‘s logo within one of the magazine’s own cartoons is a first for The New Yorker? Let me know. I think it is, but as always am delighted to be corrected.

A snippet of his drawing showing the logo appears to the left.

The Rea Irvin Masthead Watch: Sadly, nothing to report other than the redrawn version is still in place. The real deal is below (you can read about all this here).

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Terry Gross Posts Her 1986 Gahan Wilson Interview

NPR’s Terry Gross has re-posted her 1986 interview with the late very great Gahan Wilson. Listen here.

 

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Leftovers, by Jon Adams, who has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2017.