The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of July 6, 2020; A Spill Cartoonist List: Fun At First Sight

The Cover Artist: Kadir Nelson returns just two weeks after his stunning cover of June 22nd.

The Cartoonists:

The Cartoons:

A double issue with eighteen cartoons by eighteen cartoonists (with two duo efforts: Bliss & Martin, Guerra & Boothby). There’s also a Sketchpad drawing from J.A.K., and a newbie in the midst: Patrick McKelvie. Mr. McKelvie is the tenth new cartoonist to join The New Yorker’s stable this year and the sixty-third brought in by cartoon editor Emma Allen since she was appointed in the Spring of 2017.

Here are some of the cartoons in this week’s issue that caught my eye: a classic  lighthouse light bulb drawing by great Sam Gross, and then perhaps my favorite Ellis Rosen drawing ever (so far!) — his cave people drawing (much like Mr. Gross’s lighthouse drawing) proves that there is plenty of humor to unearth in these favorite cartoon scenarios. Liana Finck’s tent basement is terrif, as is Amy Hwang’s great ice cream on the beach scene. Enjoyed Roz Chast’s six-squares (the way she uses language here reminds me of Bizarro Superman).  Lars Kenseth’s superhero is so much fun. Repeating myself here, but Mr. Kenseth’s drawings never fail to amuse me upon first sighting — I’m sold before I get to the caption.

Fun At First Sight:

Thinking of that kind of reaction has caused me to think about (and mention) some other New Yorker cartoonists whose styles alone have won me over at first glance. I’m going to list only those who’ve passed into the great beyond so as not to offend anyone still around who I might inadvertently forget to mention.

Each of the following had a “theirs alone” style unlike any other being published in the magazine. That’s a wonderful thing, and difficult to do in a crowded cartoonist universe; each brought something else to the drawing paper as well — sometimes easily defined (see Dean Vietor’s work, for example: I’ve mentioned his thrilling wild energetic drawings before on the Spill), and sometimes not.

So here, in alphabetical order are some (not all!) of those fun at first sight New Yorker artists …Addams, Arno (Peter & Ed), Charles Barsotti, Whitney Darrow, Chon Day, Alan Dunn, Dana Fradon, Helen Hokinson, Nurit Karlin, Anatol Kovarsky, Robert Kraus, Frank Modell, Mary Petty, Price (George & Garrett), Gardner Rea, Donald Reilly, Carl Rose, Al Ross, Charles Saxon, Bernie Schoenbaum, Barbara Shermund, Otto Soglow, Steig, Steinberg, James Stevenson, Richard Taylor, Thurber, Dean Vietor, Robert Weber, Gluyas Williams, Gahan Wilson, and Jack Ziegler.

The Rea Irvin Talk Masthead Watch:

Would love to report that Rea Irvin’s iconic design had returned (it’s been collecting dust since it was replaced by a redraw(!) in the Spring of 2017). But such is not the case. Bah, humbug.

Read about it here.

Here’s what we’re missing:

 

 

 

Personal History: From Zero To Sixty; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon…And Yesterday’s

Personal History: From Zero To Sixty

In the summer of 1977, with college behind me and the demands of school work finally over, I was able to focus all of my attention on getting into the New Yorker — my New Yorker or Bust phase.  I’d begun sending the magazine work when I was still in high school, and then all through college, with no luck whatsoever, and an ever-increasing pile of rejected work.

For some reason, during that summer, I thought it would be smart to make a few stabs at being organized, and so I began a ledger, recording what I sent in to the magazine every week. In those days there were a bunch of other magazines buying cartoons — a ledger would help me keep track of what went where; it became routine to send my New Yorker rejects out to them (I’d somehow learned that’s what the professionals did). By mid-August I’d yet to to sell a single cartoon anywhere; I hadn’t made a penny from my work (think Beatles: Out of college, money spent, see no future, pay no rent, all the money’s gone, nowhere to go”) — even something called UFOlogy was rejecting my drawings.

Everything changed when the August 22nd batch — seventeen cartoons — was submitted to The New Yorker. That week I went from having sold zero number of drawings anywhere to any publication to having my work accepted at The New Yorker (it was a drawing of a fortune teller speaking to a customer, saying,“Nothing will ever happen to you”). As momentous a moment as that was for me — my foot finally in the door at The New Yorker! — the magazine was buying the idea (the caption) and handing it to veteran contributor Whitney Darrow, Jr. to execute. As noted in the ledger, it appeared in a December issue of the magazine — December 26th, to be exact.

By 1977, Mr. Darrow had been with the magazine 44 years. It had long been a practice at The New Yorker to supply artists in need of fresh ideas with work sent in from the outside (like me), or from other cartoonists at the magazine, or from the art department staff. There were even a few idea men contracted to do nothing but think up ideas for the artists.

I knew nothing about that system when the fortune teller cartoon made it through The New Yorker‘s editorial hurdles and was bought. I received a check for $150.00 — the first time I was paid for what I wanted to do for a living. When I look at the list shown above it’s a little frightening how empty the page is — all those empty squares, all those rejected drawings. Only two other sales on the page: both New Yorker rejects from that same August 22nd batch: one to Dawn Dusk magazine, and the other to the about-to-be-refurbished Esquire magazine (Esquire never ran that drawing or others of mine it later purchased — they changed course on running cartoons before the maiden issue under Clay Felker appeared on newsstands).

As summer turned to winter, my initial luck with The New Yorker seemed to have run out. Weeks and then months of empty ledger boxes. In early 1978, justlikethat, The New Yorker bought another from me (this time the drawing they published was mine). Oddly, I abandoned the weekly ledger just before that second drawing was taken. I think all those empty boxes were beginning to get to me.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

David Sipress on dinosaurs and stress. Mr. Sipress began contributing to The New Yorker in 1998.

And Yesterday’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Elisabreth McNair on when it’s safe to go out again.

Ms. McNair began contributing to The New yorker in July of 2018.

Some Robert Weber; From Dick Buchanan’s Vault: New Yorker Cartoonists Work Not in The New Yorker; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Some Robert Weber

From The Art Contrarian, April 6, 2020,  “Robert Weber, New Yorker Cartoonist”

— a brief reminder of the late great Mr. Weber and his work.

Above: one of Mr. Weber’s ten New Yorker covers.

Robert Weber’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Robert Weber (Pictured mid 1980s. Photograph by Liza Donnelly) Born April 22, 1924, Los Angeles, California. Died, October 20, 2016, Branford Connecticut. NYer work: nearly 1500 cartoons, and close to a dozen covers since 1962. Read Ink Spill’s November 2016 Apreciation of Mr. Weber here.

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From Dick Buchanan’s Vault: New Yorker Cartoonists Work Not In The New Yorker

From Mike Lynch’s blog, Dick Buchanan gives us a fun post of work by New Yorker cartoonists that appeared in other publications. Cartoonists include Charles Addams, Whitney Darrow, Jr., Chon Day, Richard Decker, Steinberg, Gahan Wilson, Al Ross, William Steig, Gardner Rea, George Price, Eldon Dedini, Helen Hokinson, Richard Taylor, and Barbara Shermund. Mr. Addams’ drawing in True Magazine, March 1946 shown above.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Brendan Loper on being first.

Mr. Loper began contributing to The New Yorker in 2016. See some more of his work here.

 

 

 

Article Of Interest: Whitney Darrow, Jr. Profile In Feb 1950 American Artist; Not A “Disgruntled” Employee; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon; Today’s Daily Shouts Cartoonist

Warren Bernard, frequent Spill supplier of New Yorker archival materials, has unearthed this fab February 1950 American Artist article on the late great New Yorker artist Whitney Darrow, Jr.. My thanks to Mr. Bernard for sharing it with us. As a bonus, there’s an ad featuring Mr. Darrow, Jr.’s favorite drawing paper.

Whitney Darrow, Jr.’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Whitney Darrow, Jr.  Born August 22, 1909, Princeton, NJ. Died August, 1999, Burlington, Vermont. New Yorker work: 1933 -1982. Quote (Darrow writing of himself in the third person): …in 1931 he moved to New York City, undecided between law school and doing cartoons as a profession. The fact that the [New Yorker’s] magazine offices were only a few blocks away decided him…” (Quote from catalogue, Meet the Artist, 1943)

 

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Not A “Disgruntled” Employee

The word “disgruntled” has been in the news the past few days — directly below is an example from The New York Times  — a headline from two days ago (the word popped up again today in a  New York Time’s post concerning more revelations from Mr. Bolton’s forthcoming book):

Seeing the word “disgruntled” reminded me of a cartoon of mine published in The New Yorker in the issue of March 4, 1988, wherein “disgruntled” was the key word — the reason it was bought and published.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

And speaking of politics, Teresa Burns Parkhurst imagines our forefathers tracking current events. See it here.

Ms. Parkhurst began contributing to The New Yorker in October of 2017.

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Today’s Daily Shouts Cartoonist

“Double Infirmity: A Sickly Noir” from Sofia Warren, who began contributing to The New Yorker in November 2017.

Visit her website here.

 

 

 

David Preston’s Three New Yorker Covers; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

David Preston’s Three New Yorker Covers

This grey day seemed like a good time to recall David Preston’s three New Yorker covers — all of them from the pre-buzz era when “quiet” New Yorker covers were plentiful. Below is Mr. Preston’s bio as it appeared at the 2015 Westport Historical Society exhibit, Cover Story: The New Yorker In Westport.

And here, courtesy of Sarah Geraghty Herndon, is a photo from late 1965 taken at James Geraghty’s home in Westport, Connecticut.  Mr. Preston is seated far right. Standing next to Mr. Preston is Charles Saxon. Partially obscured behind the young fellow in the white shirt is Whitney Darrow, Jr..

Further info from the Spill‘s A-Z:

Whitney Darrow, Jr. Born August 22, 1909, Princeton, NJ. Died August, 1999, Burlington, Vermont. New Yorker work: 1933 -1982. Quote (Darrow writing of himself in the third person): …in 1931 he moved to New York City, undecided between law school and doing cartoons as a profession. The fact that the [New Yorker’s] magazine offices were only a few blocks away decided him…” (Quote from catalogue, Meet the Artist, 1943)

Charles Saxon (Born in Brooklyn, NY,  Nov 13, 1920, died in Stamford, Conn., Dec 6, 1988. New Yorker work: 1943 – 1991 (2 drawings published posthumously). Key collection: One Man’s Fancy ( Dodd, Mead, 1977).

 

James Geraghty * (photo: Geraghty in his office at The New Yorker, 25 West 43rd St., 1948. Used with permission of Sarah Geraghty Herndon). Born Spokane, Washington, 1904. died Venice, Florida, January, 1983. While not a cartoonist, Geraghty’s contribution to the art of the New Yorker was substantial. He contributed material to cartoonists before and during his association with The New Yorker, where he served as art editor from 1939 until 1973, when the title passed to Lee Lorenz. In Geraghty’s NYTs obit (Jan 20, 1983), William Shawn said: “Along with Harold Ross, who was the first editor of the magazine, Geraghty set the magazine’s comic art on its course and he helped determine the direction in which the comic art would go and is still going.”

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Mort Gerberg on politics and news. Mr. Gerberg has been contributing to The New Yorker since 1965.

Visit his website here.