David Preston’s Three New Yorker Covers; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

David Preston’s Three New Yorker Covers

This grey day seemed like a good time to recall David Preston’s three New Yorker covers — all of them from the pre-buzz era when “quiet” New Yorker covers were plentiful. Below is Mr. Preston’s bio as it appeared at the 2015 Westport Historical Society exhibit, Cover Story: The New Yorker In Westport.

And here, courtesy of Sarah Geraghty Herndon, is a photo from late 1965 taken at James Geraghty’s home in Westport, Connecticut.  Mr. Preston is seated far right. Standing next to Mr. Preston is Charles Saxon. Partially obscured behind the young fellow in the white shirt is Whitney Darrow, Jr..

Further info from the Spill‘s A-Z:

Whitney Darrow, Jr. Born August 22, 1909, Princeton, NJ. Died August, 1999, Burlington, Vermont. New Yorker work: 1933 -1982. Quote (Darrow writing of himself in the third person): …in 1931 he moved to New York City, undecided between law school and doing cartoons as a profession. The fact that the [New Yorker’s] magazine offices were only a few blocks away decided him…” (Quote from catalogue, Meet the Artist, 1943)

Charles Saxon (Born in Brooklyn, NY,  Nov 13, 1920, died in Stamford, Conn., Dec 6, 1988. New Yorker work: 1943 – 1991 (2 drawings published posthumously). Key collection: One Man’s Fancy ( Dodd, Mead, 1977).

 

James Geraghty * (photo: Geraghty in his office at The New Yorker, 25 West 43rd St., 1948. Used with permission of Sarah Geraghty Herndon). Born Spokane, Washington, 1904. died Venice, Florida, January, 1983. While not a cartoonist, Geraghty’s contribution to the art of the New Yorker was substantial. He contributed material to cartoonists before and during his association with The New Yorker, where he served as art editor from 1939 until 1973, when the title passed to Lee Lorenz. In Geraghty’s NYTs obit (Jan 20, 1983), William Shawn said: “Along with Harold Ross, who was the first editor of the magazine, Geraghty set the magazine’s comic art on its course and he helped determine the direction in which the comic art would go and is still going.”

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Mort Gerberg on politics and news. Mr. Gerberg has been contributing to The New Yorker since 1965.

Visit his website here.

New New Yorker Cover Exhibit at the Westport Historical Society

WestportCheck out this new  Westport Historical Society exhibit featuring New Yorker covers by Westport area New Yorker artists  along with photographs of many of the Westport scenes that inspired the covers.  Read all about it here (including the details of a forthcoming conversation with The New Yorker‘s former Art Editor, Lee Lorenz).

Also: Read about The New Yorker in Westport (below), a limited edition coffee table book just published by the Society.

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Video: Lee Lorenz in Conversation with Michael Maslin

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Back in June of this year, I had the good fortune to interview Lee Lorenz, the former New Yorker Art Editor (and later Cartoon Editor).  The event was held at The Westport Historical Society as part of the festivities surrounding their exhibit, Cover Story: The New Yorker in Westport.  My thanks to all the good folks at the Society for hosting the event and to Gemmarose Tummolo of Spot on Pictures for filming it.

Link to the video here.

Link to The Westport Historical Society.

Link to see some of Lee Lorenz’s work on The New Yorker‘s Cartoon Bank site.

Here’s the Lee Lorenz entry on Ink Spill’s “New Yorker Cartoonists A-Z”:

Lee Lorenz ( Pictured above. Photograph taken 1995 by Liza Donnelly) *Born 1932, Hackensack, NJ. Lorenz was the art editor of The New Yorker from 1973 to 1993 and its cartoon editor until 1997. During his tenure, a new wave of New Yorker cartoonists began appearing in the magazine — cartoonists who no longer depended on idea men. Cartoon collections: Here It Comes (Bobbs-Merrrill Co., Inc. 1968) ; Now Look What You’ve Done! (Pantheon, 1977) ; The Golden Age of Trash ( Chronicle Books, 1987); The Essential series, all published by Workman: : Booth (pub: 1998), Barsotti ( pub: 1998), Ziegler (pub: 2001), The Art of The New Yorker 1925 -1995, (Knopf, 1995), The World of William Steig (Artisan, 1998). NYer work: 1958 – .

 

Reminder: Lee Lorenz “In Conversation” Tomorrow at the Westport Historical Society; Mick Stevens’ last Daily Cartoon posted

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A reminder that Lee LorenzThe New Yorker‘s Art Editor from 1973 through 1993 and its Cartoon Editor from 1993 through 1997 will be “in conversation” with me tomorrow at The Westport Historical Society @ 4:00.  Information here.

Mr. Lorenz is a long-time contributor to New Yorker — his cartoons have been appearing in the magazine since 1958.

 

From The Westport News, “Former New Yorker Art Editor to speak  in Westport”

 

And…

 

 

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Mick Stevens has announced on his  website that today’s New Yorker Daily Cartoon (left) is his last. In the post, “Back to the Batch,” Stevens says, “What I thought would be a 3 to 4 week gig turned out to last 10.” The Daily has been handled by a number of cartoonists since its recent inception, including Danny Shanahan, David Sipress, Barbara Smaller, Paul Noth, Mike Twohy, and Tom Toro. No word yet on whose turn is next.

Former New Yorker Art/Cartoon Editor Lee Lorenz at The Westport Historical Society

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From the Westport Historical Society, “A Conversation with Lee Lorenz”  (there was an Ink Spill notice about this event a few days ago, but the Society hadn’t added it to their site at the time — the link above takes you to the WHS homepage).

As noted in the WHS post I hope to cover a lot of territory with Mr. Lorenz during our talk. His 56 years (and counting) with The New Yorker include 20 years as the magazine’s Art Editor (editing cartoons and covers) and then another 4 years as its Cartoon Editor.