Advertising Work by New Yorker Cartoonists, Pt. 26: Steinberg (Pt.2)

Here’s a quartet of Steinberg ads (the second Steinberg set in this series), all courtesy of Warren Bernard, cartoon collector extraordinaire.

Not surprisingly, three of these ads are from when Steinberg was just beginning his New Yorker run (he began contributing in 1941).  The first shown here though is from 1966. It could easily have run in The New Yorker as a drawing (oh, let’s face it: any of these would’ve worked as stand alone New Yorker art).  Schweppes ad: 1950; H&G: 1948; Comptometer: 1945

The Latest New Yorker Cartoons Rated; Advertising Work by New Yorker Cartoonists, Pt. 25: Peter Arno, Pt. 2; An Otto Soglow Wartime Original; Applause Applause! Julia Wertz

The Latest New Yorker Cartoons Rated

And they’re off! “Max” & “Simon” dive into the latest New Yorker cartoons, apprising and rating as they go.  I noticed a lot of “4”s handed out this time around (and one “6” — the tippy-top number of their system).

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Advertising Work by New Yorker Cartoonists, Pt. 25: Peter Arno, Pt. 2

We continue the ad series with Peter Arno’s second solo appearance (his was the first in the series. Arno always needs to be first).  My thanks, as usual, to Warren Bernard for all of his work and generosity in sharing these pieces with the Spill folk.   What is shown here, according to Mr. Bernard, is promo work for newspapers. As you can see, the drawings contain clues. The reader is supposed to put 2 and 2 together to come up with a proper name. In the first drawing the reader sees “All Benny” and comes up with “Albany”…and so on.   Someone has helpfully provided the solution below each drawing. We don’t have dates for these pieces but judging by the style and signature, I’d place the work somewhere in the very early 1930s. If someone can be more precise, please advise.

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More Soglow from Attempted Bloggery

Otto Soglow’s name continues to pop up here on the Spill, and that’s mostly due to Stephen Nadler’s wonderful site, Attempted Bloggery wherein he presents scans of original art, explores auctioned cartoon pieces, and shows us off-the-beaten-path New Yorker cartoon materials, among other fun stuff. Here’s yet another recent Soglow post from Mr. Nadler (a portion of the drawing he’s focused on is shown above). 

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Applause, Applause!

The New York Times has named Julia Wertz’s Tenements,Towers & Trash: An Unconventional Illustrated History of New York City (Black Dog & Leventhal) as one of its 100 Notable Books of 2017.  The Spill heartily congratulates Ms. Wertz. 

 

 

Just Opened! Library of Congress Exhibit “Drawn to Purpose: American Women Illustrators and Cartoonists; Advertising Work by New Yorker Cartoonists, Pt. 24: Otto Soglow’s Pudding Drawings; More Spills: Weyant and Twohy

Library of Congress Exhibit: Drawn to Purpose: American Women Illustrators and Cartoonists

From the LOC’s press release:

Original works by women cartoonists and illustrators are featured in a new exhibition opening at the Library of Congress on Nov. 18. Spanning the late 1800s to the present, “Drawn to Purpose: American Women Illustrators and Cartoonists” brings to light remarkable but little-known contributions made by North American women to these art forms.

Among the artists represented are New Yorker contributors Roberta MacDonald, Helen Hokinson, Liza Donnelly, Peggy Bacon, Roz Chast, and Anita Kunz.

Details here.

Above: March 1920 Vanity Fair cover by Anne Harriet Fish.

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Advertising Work by New Yorker Cartoonists, Pt. 24: Otto Soglow’s Pudding Drawings.

Here are three Royal Pudding ads by the great Otto Soglow.  All feature his iconic “Little King”;  for those wanting more Soglow I suggest finding a copy of the fab Cartoon Monarch: Otto Soglow & The Little King,  edited by Dean Mullaney (IDW, 2012). I’ve shown the cover below the ads.

All these pudding ads ran in 1955.  As has been the case with a very large percentage of the Spill’New Yorker ads series, my thanks go to Warren Bernard for his generosity.

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Two books of note.  One out in January and one not out for awhile. Both for kids.

Christopher Weyant has illustrated Laura Gehl’s My Pillow Keeps Moving (Viking Books for Young Readers).  Due in mid January 2018.

Mike Twohy‘s Stop! Go! Yes, No!: A Story of Opposites (Balzer & Bray) due in August of 2018.   Cover art not yet available

 

 

 

Liza Donnelly Draws Halloween; Andy Borowitz On His Work: “It’s almost like the verbal equivalent of a New Yorker cartoon”; Tom Toro in The Paris Review; Advertising Work by New Yorker Cartoonists, Pt. 21: Addams for Sani-Flush; Steinberg: Artiste or Cartoonist?

Liza Donnelly Draws Halloween

From Liza Donnelly, Halloween drawings for CBS This MorningSee them here

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Andy Borowitz On His Work: “It’s almost like the verbal equivalent of a New Yorker cartoon”

From Poynter, October 31, 2017 —“Satirist Andy Borowitz Explains the Fine Art of Lampooning Trump” —  the interview by James Warren includes this quote from Mr. Borowitz describing his work: “It’s almost like the verbal equivalent of a New Yorker Cartoon.”

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Tom Toro in The Paris Review

Tom Toro will be illustrating one sentence at a time for The Paris Review in an eight part series,  The Complete Sentence.

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Advertising Work by New Yorker Cartoonists, Pt. 21: Addams for Sani-Flush

Thanks to the generosity of Warren Bernard, the series of New Yorker cartoonists advertising work continues on. Here are four Sani-Flush ads by the great Charles Addams (it being Halloween you just know that Mr. Addams would turn up here on the Spill).  All these ads are dated 1942.

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Steinberg: Artiste or Cartoonist

From Escapeintolife.com, “Toon Musings: Saul Steinberg / Artiste or Grubby Cartoonist”

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Advertising Work by New Yorker Cartoonists, Pt. 20: William Steig (Part 3)

We continue with this series of advertising work by New Yorker artists, nearly all of it brought to you via the tireless efforts and generosity of Warren Bernard (when others have contributed it is duly noted). William Steig, one the gods of the New Yorker cartoon world did a lot (a lot) of advertising work. He’s the first in this series to rate a Part 3 (with a potential Part 4 in the future). Dates for ads: AmEX, 1952; Pennzoil, 1952; Dupont, 1946; Nestle’s Quik, 1953; Delco, 1960.   

Here’s Mr. Steig’s listing on the Spill’s New Yorker Cartoonists A-Z:

William Steig (photo above) Born in Brooklyn, NY, Nov. 14, 1907, died in Boston, Mass., Oct. 3, 2003. In a New Yorker career that lasted well over half a century and a publishing history that contains more than a cart load of books, both children’s and otherwise, it’s impossible to sum up Steig’s influence here on Ink Spill. He was among the giants of the New Yorker cartoon world, along with James Thurber, Saul Steinberg, Charles Addams, Helen Hokinson and Peter Arno. Lee Lorenz’s World of William Steig (Artisan, 1998) is an excellent way to begin exploring Steig’s life and work. New Yorker work: 1930 -2003.