Advertising Work by New Yorker Cartoonists, Pt. 32: George Price

It’s more than fair to say no one drew like George Price. His work looks like a cartoon schematic.  And then there are those somewhat mysterious split lines. Looking at one of his original drawings up real close you can see that the splits were created by his drawing over and over (and over) his original pen stroke. He’d build up the line, and sometimes be off enough to create a parallel line. A fascinating style.

 Surprising (to me anyway) that it’s taken til Part 32 of this series to get to Mr. Price as he is a New Yorker cartoon god. He contributed to the magazine for 62 years, becoming one of only 23 members of the K Club (his work was published over a thousand times in The New Yorker). The database shows the exact number to be 1, 279 (including his one cover, above right).   

Here are just some of many ads by Mr. Price, all courtesy (as usual in this series) of SPX’s Warren Bernard.  All Mr. Bernard’s work — the researching, scanning, organizing, sharing — is greatly appreciated.

Below: two Durkee’s ads: on the left from 1955, and the other 1957. Scotch Tape, 1947; Peterman Ant Killer, 1946; American Express, 1954; Del Monte, 1969

 

Here’s Mr. Price’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

George Price Born in Coytesville, New Jersey, June 9, 1901. Died January 12, 1995, Engelwood, New Jersey. New Yorker work: 1929 – 1991.  To see Mr. Price’s cartoon collections visit the Spill‘s Cartoonists Library.

 

 

 

 

Advertising Work by New Yorker Cartoonists, Pt. 31: Ed Nofziger

  A brief return to the advertising series brought to you through the generosity of SPX’s Warren Bernard. Here’s work by Ed Nofziger, who contributed cartoons to the New Yorker from 1936 through 1940.

 Link to his obit from the L.A. Times, Nov. 11, 2000. 

 Link here to Mr. Nofziger’s IMDb profile

Below: Mr. Nofziger and a self portrait from Best Cartoons of the Year 1943.

Below: Mr. Nofziger’s first New Yorker cartoon, November 14, 1936. Great drawing!

And here are a few American Express ads. The first two are from 1949, and the last two from 1952.

 

 

 

The Tilley Watch Online; Advertising Work by New Yorker Cartoonists, Pt. 30: Helen Hokinson for Flit

On this always somewhat hard-to-define week between Christmas Day and New Years Day, these are the New Yorker cartoonists who figured into either the Daily cartoon or Daily Shouts:

*A Daily cartoon by Mort Gerberg:  a skier sees a warning sign(post).

*Another installment of Liana Finck’s “Dear Pepper” series on Daily Shouts.

*An animated Daily cartoon by Sharon Levy .

*Lars Kenseth’s illustrations for Rejected Versions of “The Gift of the Maji”  — a  Zack Wortman Daily Shouts piece.

All of these can be seen on newyorker.com, either here (Daily Cartoon) or here (Daily Shouts)

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Advertising Work by New Yorker Cartoonists, Pt. 30: Helen Hokinson for Flit

  Ms. Hokinson, one of the New Yorker‘s earliest stars (Peter Arno was the other) makes her second solo appearance in this series of ads with these two drawings for Flit, both from 1935.  My thanks again to SPX’s Warren Bernard for sharing these ads with us.

Helen Hokinson’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Helen Hokinson (above) Born, Illinois,1893; died, Washington, D.C., 1949. New Yorker work: 1925 -1949, with some work published posthumously. All of Hokinson’s collections are wonderful, but here are two favorites. Her first collection: So You’re Going To Buy A Book! (Minton, Balch & Co, 1931) and what was billed as “the final Hokinson collection”: The Hokinson Festival (Dutton & Co., 1956)

*For more reading on Ms. Hokinson there’s no better place to go but Liza Donnelly’s  Funny Ladies: The New Yorker’s Greatest Women Cartoonists and Their Cartoons (Prometheus, 2005). Foreword by Jules Feiffer.  Preface by Lee Lorenz.

 

 

 

The Tilley Watch Online; Advertising Work by New Yorker Cartoonists, Pt. 29: Otto Soglow for Pepsi

 Aliens, Banned CDC words, special prosecutor Robert Mueller, and the Republicans’ tax bill — all explored this week on the Daily Cartoons slot via Kim Warp, Lars Kenseth, and David Sipress. Over on Daily Shouts, contributing cartoonist Emma Hunsinger’s “Meet the Corporatesens: A Working Family” appeared on Wednesday.   

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Advertising Work by New Yorker Cartoonists, Pt.29: Otto Soglow for Pepsi

This is the third appearance of Mr. Soglow’s advertising work…and it won’t be the last.  His fun friendly line and characters were obviously irresistible to advertisers.  Here’s part of a 1942 series he did for Pepsi.

–For his generosity in allowing the Spill to post this work, a big round of applause once again for Warren Bernard.

Otto Soglow’s entry on the Spill’s A-Z:

Otto Soglow (pictured above) Born, Yorkville, NY, December 23, 1900. Died in NYC, April 1975. New Yorker work: 1925 -1974.Key collections: Pretty Pictures ( Farrar & Rinehart, 1931) and for fans of Soglow’s Little King; The Little King (Farrar & Rinehart, 1933) and The Little King ( John Martin’s House, Inc., 1945). The latter Little King is an illustrated storybook. Cartoon Monarch / Otto Soglow & The Little King (IDW, 2012) is an excellent compendium.

 

Advertising Work By New Yorker Cartoonists, Pt. 28: Syd Hoff; Blog of Interest: A New Yorker State of Mind

Our 28th entry in the series of ads brought to you through the generosity of mega-collector, Warren Bernard.  Here we have a quartet of Syd Hoff Auto- Lite Batteries ads from the mid 1940s (top to bottom: 1944, 1943, 1943, 1944).

 

Here’s Mr. Hoff’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z, and a Hoff cartoon collection from 1961:

Syd Hoff ( Pictured above. Source: Esquire Cartoon album, 1957) Born 1912, New York City, died May 12, 2004, Miami Beach, Florida. New Yorker work: 1931 – 1975. Website: http://www.sydhoff.org/

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Blog of Interest: A New Yorker State of Mind

Another fine fun interesting read from this site “reading every issue of the New Yorker” —

This week it’s a close look at the issue of October 27, 1928, which has a somewhat lost-in-the-sauce Peter Arno cover. Arno was familiar with his subject matter — he had played football while at Hotchkiss, just six years (just six years!) before this cover was published: