New Yorker Cartoonists Turn Out for Holiday Party

 

 New Yorker cartoonists turned out in time honored fashion to celebrate the holidays last night.  Corey Pandolph gets a heap of credit for procuring a corner of the Upper East Side Hi Life Restaurant where nearly two dozen contributors came together in good cheer.  Among those attending, including Mr. Pandolph: Joe Dator, David Borchardt, Liam Walsh (who brought and shared a tray of cookies), Andy Friedman, Liza Donnelly, Robert Leighton, Bob Esmay, Emily Flake, Drew Dernavich, Farley Katz, John O’Brien, Avi Steinberg (celebrating his first appearance in the magazine), Barbara Smaller, Felipe Galindo, David Sipress, Bob Eckstein, Eric Lewis, Ward Sutton, Christopher Weyant, Ben Schwartz, and Karen Sneider.

Liza Donnelly has posted on her blog  a handful of photographs taken at the event.

NCS Divisional Award Nominees; Polan continues to see things; Sutton on Mad Men’s future ; Paul Karasik curates

From the National Cartoonists Society,  the 2012 Divisional Award nominees include a number of artists from The New Yorker: Edward Sorel, Barbara Smaller, Glen LeLievre, Matthew Diffee, Zachary Kanin, Ben Katchor, and Bruce McCall.  Winners to be announced May 26th, 2012.

 

Over at The New York Times (online), Jason Polan has posted his second in a series of What I Saw…sorry, no link, just go to nytimes.com and look around.

 

From Paul Karasik this video tour of an exhibit he curated, “Graphic Novel Realism” (details found on the post).

 

And at The Village Voice, Ward Sutton gives us an “Unofficial Future History of Mad Men”

Ward Sutton’s Davy Jones Tribute; Jack Ziegler’s First OK; Panel discussion with Flake, Dernavich and Katz

From Spin, “Ward Sutton’s Most Memorable Encounter With The Monkees’ Davy Jones”

 

From newyorker.com, two items of interest:

Bob Mankoff continues his series of My First OK.  Last week it was Mick Stevens, this week it’s Jack Ziegler’s turn with the post “The Journey of a Thousand Cartoons”.

 

And, on March 5th, The New Yorker’s Editor, David Remnick moderates a panel discussion with cartoonists, Emily Flake, Drew Dernavich and Farley Katz

 

 

It’s Not All About New Yorker Cartoons…But Mostly It Is

 

 

 

It makes sense that the shelves of the cartoon library of two New Yorker cartoonists would be sagging under the weight of New Yorker cartoon collections. But a  large fragment of what makes up our cartoon library has little to do with New Yorker cartoons and a lot to do with work that initially inspired us, and with newer work that continues to inspire.

 

Pictured above is a condensed collection — a mini-library — of non-New Yorker books that I keep near my office (my wife has her own mini-library in her office). There’re a lot of books devoted to Superman and Batman, and that’s exactly how it should be.  Those were my earliest influences along with a few Sunday Funnies, such as Blondie and Dick Tracy.  And then, of course, there was Mad (I’m especially fond of Mad Cover To Cover).

 

The two Smithsonian collections pictured (Comic-Book Comics and Newspaper Comics) are essential cartoon library books.  The R. Crumb books are there because his work acted as bridge  connecting the years I devoted to comic books with my earliest days of discovering New Yorker cartoonists (Crumb himself began contributing to The New Yorker in the 1990s and then stopped contributing due to…well, let’s leave that for another post).

There’re a number of books devoted to graphic novels.  I had the graphic novel fever for a while.   The Marx Brothers Scrapbook in the photo sits next to Monty Python Speaks!   Neither are cartoon collections, but it’s fitting that they are represented.  Their work was and is as graphically inspiring as any of the others on the shelves.

A handful of  New Yorker contributors books are part of this mini-library (Crumb, for instance, as well as Edward Sorel, Ward Sutton, Daniel Clowes,  and Seth), but these books are from their other fields of interest.

The eagle-eyed will spot an actual New Yorker collection.  It makes no sense that it’s there and I can only think it has to do with its origin —  it’s a French collection.

Ward Sutton’s Washington DC Reboot; Video: Joe Farris’ Soldier’s Sketchbook; Sipress Speaks

 

From The Village Voice, “Washington DC Reboot” — this must-see slide show of some familiar characters rebooted by Ward Sutton. (Image above, from the slide show,  courtesy of Ward Sutton).

 

From National Geographic, November 11, 2011, “A Soldier’s Sketchbook: From the Front Lines of World War II” — this piece on Joe Farris, with video.

 

From Nearsay, November 9, 2011, “Cartoons and Laughs with David Sipress” — this post concerning an upcoming event (Nov 12, 2011).