The Tilley Watch: The Daily Shouts Cartoonist; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon; The Norman Rockwell Museum’s Four Freedoms Forum

No new issue this week (last week’s was a double)… but, as always, there’s online cartoon activity at newyorker.com :

Yesterday’s Daily Shouts cartoonist Ward Sutton brought us “Lower-Bar Heroes Of The Coronavirus”…Mr. Sutton has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2007.  Visit his website here.

Today’s Daily cartoon is by Liz Montague, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2019.  Visit her website here.

 

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Norman Rockwell Museum Four Freedoms Forum

All the info here.

  • Jenn Smith (moderator), Community engagement editor and education reporter at The Berkshire Eagle
  • Brooke Bridges, Founder and CEO of Building Bridges SEL
  • Liza Donnelly, Illustrator and Author, Cartoonist for Peace
  • Gwendolyn Hamden Van Sant, Founder and CEO of Multicultural Bridge
  • Laurie Norton Moffatt, Director and CEO of the Norman Rockwell Museum
  • Roberta McCulloch Dews, Education Chair of the Norman Rockwell Museum Board of Trustees, and Director of Administrative Services, Mayor’s Office at City of Pittsfield
  • Jerry Pinkney, Illustrator and Author, Caldecott Winner, and Coretta Scott King Book Award Winner

 

 

The Weekend Spill: The American Bystander’s Quarantine Calvacade; Film Of Interest: Barsotti: A Cartoonist’s Life; The Tilley Watch Online, April 13-17, 2020

American Bystander’s Cartoon Quarantine Calvacade

Michael Gerber, publisher and driving force behind The American Bystander has begun a Cartoon Quarantine Calvacade. He tells the Spill, he began it as an “outlet” for “both the audience and the contributors.” See it here (and subscribe to the Bystander while you’re there!).

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From a 14 year old Kansas filmmaker, Carter Rostrom, this short (5 minute) film, Barsotti: A Cartoonist’s Life. My thanks to Michael Gerber (of American Bystander fame) for bringing it to my attention.

Here’s Mr. Barsotti’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Charles Barsotti (photo above) Born, San Marcos, Texas, September 28, 1933.  Died, Kansas City, Mo., June 16, 2014. Mr. Barsotti was briefly the cartoon editor of The Saturday Evening Post (from 1968 until its demise in 1969). The New York Times review of his 1981 collection “Kings Don’t Carry Money” led with the following:”Thurber lives, in Kansas City under the name of Charles Barsotti.” His deceptively simple line drawings of pups and kings, and businessmen have been a presence in The New Yorker for over fifty years. It is likely that Mr. Barsotti is the only New Yorker cartoonist to have ever run for Congress (an unsuccessful bid, in 1972, in Kansas). New Yorker work: 1962 – . Key collections: Kings Don’t Carry Money (Dodd, Mead, 1981), and The Essential Charles Barsotti, Compiled and Edited by Lee Lorenz (Workman, 1998).

Link to Ink Spill’s Charles Barsotti appreciation

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The Tilley Watch Online, April 13 -17, 2020

An end of week listing of New Yorker artists who contributed to newyorker.com features.

The Daily Cartoon: Lila Ash, Paul Noth, Jon Adams, Peter Kuper, Brooke Bourgeois.

Daily Shouts: Liana Finck, Olivia de Recat, Sara Lautman, Ward Sutton, Ali Fitzgerald.

…and Blitt’s Kvetchbook: “Duck Doctor Dynasty”

 

All’s Fair In Love & War Cover Revealed!; Interview Of Interest: Ed Steed; Article Of Interest: Tom Gauld; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon…And Yesterday’s; Today’s Daily Shouts Cartoonist…And Yesterday’s Daily Shouts Cartoonist; Liza Donnelly On Drawing During The Pandemic

 

The cover of the 3rd title in Bob Eckstein’s fab Ultimate Cartoon Book series has just been posted on its publisher’s site. Princeton Architectural Press plans an October pub date for All’s Fair In Love & War. The cartoon on the cover is by the great Sam Gross (who also supplied the cover art for the first in the series, shown below left.  A Danny Shanahan cartoon appears on the second in the series, below right.

 

*full disclosure: my work appears in these collections.

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Interview Of Interest: Ed Steed

From It’s Nice That, April 14, 2020 — this interview with Ed Steed, who’s been contributing his work to The New Yorker since 2013.

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Article Of Interest: Tom Gauld

From The New York Times, April 14, 2020,  “He Makes Physics Funny”  — this piece on Tom Gauld.

Visit his website here.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon…and Yesterday’s

A kid’s $ worries by Peter Kuper. Mr. Kuper has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2011. Visit his website here.

Brooke Bourgeois on isolating on an island. Ms. Bourgeois has been contributing to The New Yorker since April of 2019. Visit her website here.

 

Today’s Daily Shouts Cartoonist

“Is Covid-19 The Apocalypse? Generations React”   from Ward Sutton, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2007. Visit his website here.

 

…and Yesterday’s Daily Shouts Cartoonist

Ali Fitzgerald’s “Meet The Russian Trolls Meddling In Your Election”

 

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Liza Donnelly On Drawing During The Pandemic

From Medium, April 13, 2020, Drawing During The Pandemic — Liza Donnelly on how she graphically copes, including daily live drawing.

Ms. Donnelly began contributing to The New Yorker in 1982.  Visit her website here.

 

 

The Weekend Spill: Unboxing A Box Of Steinbergs & Steigs; The Tilley Watch Online, The Week Of March 2-6, 2020; James Stevenson Documentary At Martha’s Vineyard Film Fest; More Spills…

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So often when I go on a hunt for something in the Spill‘s archives I come upon some other thing that takes me off onto another track. Today for instance, while poking around piles of boxes, I came across the box you see above.  Many years ago I filled the box with issues of The New Yorker bearing  Steinberg covers and Steig covers — then I stuck a label on the box and put the box on a shelf where it remained unopened for at least a decade, if not more. Today I opened the box and placed most of the issues out on a table.

Gems all! Maybe a dozen more issues didn’t make it into the photograph, but you get the idea. What I find interesting about this group is that I cannot remember why I bothered to gather these particular issues.

After photographing them, I put them all back in their beat-up box. I have plans to incorporate them into the loose issue New Yorker collection — but not today; maybe in 2030, when I come across the box again.

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A listing of New Yorker artists who contributed to newyorker.com features this past week

The Daily Cartoon: Christopher Weyant, David Sipress, Ellis Rosen, Elisabeth McNair, Ali Solomon.

Daily Shouts: Ward Sutton.

…and Barry Blitt’s Kvetchbook.

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Sally Williams fab 2019 documentary Stevenson Lost & Found will be shown March 29th at The Martha’s Vineyard Film Fest. Info here.  Lucky you if you’re on the island and able to attend.

Mr. Stevenson’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

James Stevenson Born, NYC, 1929. Died, February 17, 2017, Cos Cob, Connecticut. New Yorker work: March 10, 1956 -. Stevenson interned as an office boy at The New Yorker in the mid 1940s when he began supplying ideas for other New Yorker artists. Nine years later he was hired a full-time ideaman, given an office at the magazine and instructed not to tell anyone what he did. He eventually began publishing his own cartoons and covers as well as a ground-breaking Talk of the Town pieces (ground breaking in that the pieces were illustrated). His contributions to the magazine number over 2000. Key collections: Sorry Lady — This Beach is Private! ( MacMillan, 1963), Let’s Boogie ( Dodd, Mead, 1978). Stevenson was a children’s book author, with roughly one hundred titles to his credit. He was a frequent contributor to the Op-Ed page of The New York Times, under the heading Lost and Found New York. Stevenson’s The Life, Loves and Laughs of Frank Modell, published in 2013, is essential reading.  Sally Williams’ 2019 documentary film, Stevenson Lost & Found is essential viewing.

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…Just a few days ago while browsing through a bound volume of New Yorkers I came across a drawing by Ihrie Means (in the issue of May 14, 2007). Ms. Means name has now been added to the Spill‘s A-Z. My apologies for not adding her sooner.

…Work by Liz Montague, a newer addition to the New Yorker’s stable (March, 2019), is in (A Mini) Zine Fest, later this month.  Details here.

…The late great Syd Hoff‘s name came up in yesterday’s New York Times crossword puzzle: the clue (if that’s what it’s called — I’m not a crossword puzzler) was Cartoonist Hoff. 

Here’s Syd Hoff’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Syd Hoff ( Photo source: Esquire Cartoon album, 1957) Born 1912, New York City, died May 12, 2004, Miami Beach, Florida. New Yorker work: 1931 – 1975. Visit the Syd Hoff website here.

 

Thurber Thursday: A Thurber Dog Cap; Sutton’s Daily; Chast In Florida; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

There aren’t a lot of wearables in the Spill’s archives — a Sam Cobean scarf, and just a few hats: one worn by Mischa Richter for the Arnold Newman New Yorker cartoonists group photo shoot in 1997, and this Thurber cap, bought ages ago in Columbus, Ohio at The Thurber House. I’ve always loved the simplicity of it — no need to fill the hat with running dogs. As befits Thurber’s art, less is so much more.

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Yesterday’s Daily Shouts, courtesy of the fab Ward Sutton: “Where All That Bloomberg Campaign Money Went”

Mr. Sutton began contributing to The New Yorker in 2007. Visit his website here.

 

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Chast In Florida

From Boca, March 4, 2020, “Roz Chast Delights, Moves Audience at Festival of the Arts”***

***A correction regarding this passage in the above piece:

She [Roz Chast] explored a bit of her glass-ceiling backstory as the only female cartoonist at the New Yorker circa 1978, when, at 23, she made a sale from her very first batch of submissions.

Nurit Karlin’s cartoons were being published at the time Ms. Chast began contributing to The New Yorker. Ms. Karlin’s cartoons appeared in The New Yorker from 1974 through 1988.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Being right all the time, courtesy of David Sipress, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 1998. See more of his work here.