A Virgil Partch Bonanza Via Dick Buchanan; The New Yorker:”A World Without MAD Magazine”; A Daily Bonus And Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

A Virgil Partch Bonanza

Dick Buchanan has dug into his voluminous files for a whole lot of Virgil Partch. Mr. Partch’s cartoons  (he signed his work “VIP”) appeared in The New Yorker just a half dozen times, but could be found in many of the major (and some of the minor) magazines of his day . Mr. Buchanan gives us a wonderful four-part survey via Mike Lynch’s blog.

Above: From Liberty March 4, 1944, courtesy of Mr. Buchanan’s files

Below, his Spill A-Z entry

Virgil Partch (VIP)  Born, St. Paul Island, Alaska, 1917; died in a car crash on Interstate 5, north of Los Angeles. California, August 1984. New Yorker work: six drawings, beginning in November 21, 1942. His last appeared May 3, 1976.

 

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The New Yorker: “A World Without MAD Magazine”

 

The New Yorker has weighed in on the demise of MAD.  Read Jordan Orlando’s Culture Desk piece, “A World Without MAD Magazine” here.

Pictured: The Spill‘s all-too-slim collection of MADs, running from 1960 – 1981.

 

 

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A Bonus Daily from Barry Blitt…And Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Mr. Mueller at home. Barry Blitt began contributing to The New Yorker in 1993. Visit his website here.

And today’s Daily: More Mueller from David Sipress, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 1998.

Spiegelman on Maus & Post-Maus; Cartoonists & Cookbooks

From Kentwired.com, March 7, 2018, “Pulitzer Prize Winning Author Art Spiegelman Discusses Politics and Identity”Maus and more from the celebrated cartoonist who began contributing to The New Yorker in 1992.

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Cartoonists & Cookbooks

The Cartoonist Cookbook popped up on an online search yesterday.  Published in 1966 by Hobbs, Dorman & Co., it includes 45 favorite recipes by strip cartoonists. I was only able to find a partial list of contributors.*  Here’s a short post about the book.

 

I’m certain that that’s a Virgil Partch drawing in the first column, five squares down on the front cover. Here’s his Spill A-Z entry:

Virgil Partch ( VIP) (pictured above) Born, St. Paul Island, Alaska, 1917; died in a car crash on Interstate 5, north of Los Angeles. California, August 1984. NYer work: six drawings, beginning in November 21, 1942. His last appeared May 3, 1976.

Also showing up online was this Charles Addams cookbook that I somehow missed over the past few years (Simon & Schuster, 2005):

The only thing close to either of these in the Spill‘s library is the below desserts cookbook featuring a Peter Arno cover (but, alas, no recipes by Arno, who liked to cook).

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*Thanks to the cartoonist, Eli Stein, we now have the entire list of contributors to the Cartoonist Cook Book.  My thanks to Mr. Stein for forwarding. 

 

Tom Toro on Pencils…and More Spills

tumblr_inline_nwjlrpTXsG1sj0qh6_500A Case For Pencils is visited by Tom Toro this week.  Check it out!

Link here to Mr. Toro’s website.

 

 

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More Spills Icon Edited

 

 

 

 

 

 

…Mike Lynch celebrates the 99th birthday of Virgil Partch aka VIP

 

…Two pieces on The New York Review of Books new New York Review Comics, including titles by Abner Dean and Glen Baxter: TCJ’s coverage here…
and Heidi MacDonald’s coverage on The Beat…

 

…read a new interview with Liana Finck here…

 

 

 

It’s A Gift!

ColliersHere’s a little gem of a cartoon collection I found not long ago.  Colliers had the very good habit of collecting cartoons that appeared in its pages.  It’s A Gift!, published in 1947, includes work by New Yorker contributors John Ruge, Gardner Rea, Virgil Partch aka VIP,  Hank Ketcham, Larry Reynolds, Garrett Price, and Barney Tobey.  The editor, Gurney Williams, tells us in the book’s “Prelude” that each contributing cartoonist has written a little piece informing us what “he’d much rather do than draw funny pictures…”

Link here to Chris Wheeler’s wonderful site to see more Colliers cartoon collections.

 

P.S. Mueller: Snatching Steinberg…and Thurber, Steig, Day, Soglow…

Continuing Ink Spill‘s series of New Yorker cartoonists talking about important cartoon connections in their lives is P.S. Mueller on discovering Steinberg’s work.  Mr. Mueller has been contributing to The New Yorker since 1998.   “1958 Zorro Meets Steinberg” and photograph courtesy of Mr. Mueller.

 

1958 Zorro Meets Steinberg
In my adult mind I think of Saul Steinberg as an artist who forged his own passport out of hell and playfully went on from there. But his complicated life and tricky dance with identity meant nothing to the six or seven year-old Zorro impersonator who long ago became fascinated with his insanely simple and perfect line drawings.
I became a Steinberg thief immediately upon encountering his drawings in my father’s mile high stack of New Yorkers and proudly remain one to this day. When no one arrested me, I kept at it, snatching a bit of Thurber, a dash of Soglow, a pixilated grin from Steig, a blank look from Chon Day, and so on, until the lot of them came to inhabit me the way swallows inhabit a barn. The ghosts of Virgil Partch and Roger Price haunt this fluttery loft as well, but I digress.
How can it be that a few line drawings glimpsed at such an early age more or less charted an entire career path for a kid in Ohio? Was it something to do with the moment of discovery rather than the discovery itself? Or kismet? Nah, I don’t buy any part of the whole kismet thing. It had to be that Rumanian cipher with the paper bag over his head who tempted me to forge my own papers with stolen ink.
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See some of Steinberg’s work for The New Yorker here.
See P.S. Mueller’s New Yorker work here.
(Left:  P.S. Mueller around the time he first encountered the work of Saul Steinberg)