The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of November 4, 2019

The Cover: Without heading to the Table Of Contents and reading the title for this cover I’m going to guess it’s a comment on city noise. I’ve always felt New Yorker covers should work stand alone, without explanation, or description. This was the practice until Tina Brown’s revamp of the magazine, beginning with the issue of October 5, 1992.

Okay, now to the Table of Contents and the cover’s title: “Noise New York.”

There’s a hint of Steinberg on the cover; the police car beams of flashing lights for instance. Below left, a detail from Steinberg’s March 13, 1978 New Yorker cover, and to the right, a detail from this week’s cover (by Richard McGuire).

 

 

 

 

If you want to read more about Mr. McGuire’s cover, go here.

The Cartoonists:

Some random thoughts on some of the Cartoons & Cartoonists:

So yay! A lot of cartoonists. If we count the two teams (Sofia Warren & J.A.K., and Pia Guerra & Ian Boothby) as one cartoonist per drawing, there are twenty-one contributors.

There’s a newbie: Luke Kruger-Howard, who is the twenty-fourth new member of the magazine’s stable of cartoonists this year and the fiftieth newbie under Emma Allen’s editorship, begun in the Spring of 2017.

There are four bedroom cartoons in the issue: one by Victoria Roberts (page 46), one by the aforementioned Mr. Kruger-Howard (p. 23), one by Will McPhail (p. 36), and one by the aforementioned team of Guerra & Boothby (p. 70). Victoria Roberts’ three little pigs in bed drawing is both funny and touching.  It’s become an instant favorite Roberts cartoon.

Paul Noth has a fine colorful cartoon on page 50.  As mentioned here a number of times, it’s the cartoons that surprise that catch my attention (and often my affection). This is an out-of-left-field drawing that surprises. What more could one ask for.

P.C. Vey specializes in out-of-left-field drawings. His hikers (p. 54) don’t disappoint. I love everything about this drawing, especially the unseen co-hikers’ name (“the Jensons”). Someone ought to frame the original and hang it on a wall.

One can’t see Karl Stevens “Casablanca” drawing (p.39) without recalling others. A quick search on the magazine’s Cartoon Bank turned up five (it’s possible there are more):

Bob Eckstein’s from November 30, 2015

This classic from  Sam Gross, published February 11, 2008

A duo effort by Emily Flake & Rob Kutner, published October 16, 2017 

One by the late great Al Ross, published February 2, 1987.

And this fun one by Julia Suits, published October 30, 2017

 

High on my favorite things to draw are dogs and clouds. It’s only natural then that I’d be partial to a drawing that combines both, such as Amy Hwang’s cartoon on page 31 (her poodles are ever-so-slightly Gahan Wilsonesque).

I can’t see a cloud-based New Yorker drawing — heck, I can’t see clouds — without thinking of Charles Addams’ classic cover of May 19, 1975.

 

Lastly, I appreciate the challenge presented by aerial view drawings such as Sofia Warren & J.A.K’s joint effort on page 28. The last one I recall seeing was this one by David Borchart, published  February 22, 2016.  Then there is this spectacular dizzying cover from Adolph Kronengold, published September 22, 1928.

The Rea Irvin Talk Masthead Watch

Sadly, Mr. Irvin’s iconic Talk masthead drawing (below) remains mothballed. It was replaced by a redraw in 2017 after appearing 92 years.  Read about it here.

 

 

 

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of September 30, 2019

The Cover: Christoph Niemann returns for the Technology Issue.  Read Francoise Mouly’s Q&A with him about his cover.

The Cartoonists & Cartoons:

Electronically flipping through this new issue (appropriately enough for the Technology Issue) I was happy that the cartoons just kept-a-comin’; there are seventeen of them to be exact. All of them are placed well (i.e., they have plenty of breathing room, and sit well on the page).

Here are random thoughts about some of the cartoons in the new issue…

Joe Dator’s laundromat drawing (page 50): When asked why The New Yorker didn’t run color cartoons*, The New Yorker‘s founder and first editor, Harold Ross reportedly said, “What’s so funny about red?”  What he didn’t say was,“What’s so funny about beet red?”  Mr. Dators’ drawing, incorporating beet red, is hilarious.

I hovered over Victoria Roberts’ campers and bear drawing (p.46), enjoying the drawing itself. We’re used to seeing many of Ms. Roberts drawings set indoors — it’s fun to see her drawing of a tent, and a bear (or a man in a bear suit).

Jason Patterson’s ice cream trucks heading south for the winter  (p. 25) is also fun to linger on. Its concept seems out of the Jack Ziegler school of zany.  Such a good drawing.

Also of note, graphically, and otherwise-ly: Ellie Black’s little red riding hood drawing (p.78)…and Maggie Mull’s Beautiful Mind-ish drawing on page 70; nice to see it stretched out on the page.

Shannon Wheeler’s broccoli opera drawing on page 77.  Its execution is reminiscent of some of William Steig’s middle period work (check out Steig’s 1942 collection, The Lonely Ones).

And of note in a different department: the magazine’s assistant cartoon editor, Colin Stokes’ Shouts & Murmurs piece,“Running With Scissors” (p.33).

The Rea Irvin Talk Masthead Watch: Mr. Irvin’s classic masthead drawing (below) has yet to return.  Hope springs eternal here on The Spill. Read about it here.

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*There were two color cartoons in Ross’s era, very early on in the magazine’s life; both appeared in the issue of December 12, 1925. A full page by Ralph Barton, and a double page spread by Rea Irvin. Mr. Barton did not use red in his drawing, Mr. Irvin did.

 

 

The Weekend Spill: A MAD New Yorker Cartoonist: Jason Chatfield; A MAD Facebook Group Of Interest; Interview: Victoria Roberts; Summer Of 1930 Via A New Yorker State Of Mind; A New York Times MAD Op-Ed

A MAD New Yorker Cartoonist

Jason Chatfield, a MAD cartoonist, has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2017. Read his Medium piece posted yesterday:  “World MAD As Cartoonists Get Rubbed Out”

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A MAD Facebook Group Of Interest

The Facebook group, MAD Mumblings, seems like a good place to keep in touch with current MAD events.  A number of contributors belong.

(the accompanying Save MAD Magazine graphic seen here credited to Chet Jasper Reams)

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Article Of Interest: Victoria Roberts 

From Atencion: San Miguel, “Working For The New Yorker: An Interview With Cartoonist Victoria Roberts”

— Ms. Roberts began contributing to The New Yorker in 1988.

Visit her website here.

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A New Yorker State Of Mind

Return to the summer of 1930 via A New Yorker State of Mind‘s deep dive into the July 4th & 12th issues of that year.  Lots of cartoons, of course, and so much more.

Cover above left by Alajalov, and above right by Julian de Miskey.

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A New York Times MAD Op-Ed

From The New York Times, July 12, 2019, an op-ed piece by Tim Krieder, “The World According To Mad Magazine”

( MAD Magazine pieces are being posted here in recognition of its relationship to so many New Yorker cartoonists, past and present, and because it’s MAD Magazine).

 

Two Peacocks Walk Into A Room; Rare Book Of Interest: A John M. Price Cartoon Anthology: Sara Lautman’s Daily Shouts; Today’s Daily Cartoonist: Avi Steinberg

In one of those million-to-one cartoon moments, both my colleague Harry Bliss (with his collaborator Steve Martin) and I have similar drawings out this week (his in his syndicated daily spot, and mine in The New Yorker). What’s unusual, besides the timing of publication, and the peacock standing in a doorway in both drawings, is the use of the peacock itself. A quick visit to the New Yorker‘s Cartoon Bank site turned up peacock drawings by a dozen artists. I have to think there were a number more in the magazine’s ninety-four years (the Cartoon Bank site does not provide every cartoon in the magazine’s archive). The listed peacock drawings are by: Mick Stevens, Sam Gross, Will McPhail, John O’Brien, George Booth, Bernard Schoenbaum, George Price, Edward Koren, Saul Steinberg (he has three), Robert Day, Mort Gerberg, and Victoria Roberts. There were also three peacock covers shown. The artists:  Joseph Low (the peacock is a minor character in his cover), Steinberg, and the one-and-only Rea Irvin. 

I asked Mr. Bliss if he’d like to comment on our dual peacock drawings, and here’s what he had to say:

That’s crazy! I didn’t get my new issue of The New Yorker yet, so I didn’t even know that was in there.  When I initially did my drawing, from an idea given to me by Steve Martin, I think I mentioned to Emma [Emma Allen, The New Yorker‘s cartoon editor] that I wanted it to be in color. Seeing yours now, makes me wonder if they bought yours before they had seen mine and the reason they didn’t buy mine and Steve’s is because they had already bought yours… Similars? Anyway, I think the reason there aren’t that many peacock cartoons out there is because the damn thing is so hard to draw!

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Rare Book Of Interest: A John M. Price Anthology

Warren Bernard (of SPX fame) has alerted the Spill to another rarity: a cartoon collection of work by John M. Price who contributed four drawings to the magazine (Mr. Bernard tells me that three of Mr. Price’s four New Yorker drawings appear in the collection). Here’s Price’s rather skimpy bio on the A-Z (if anyone out there has more info please send this way):

John M. Price Born  (Pennsylvania?) February 5, 1918, died January 19, 2009, Radnor, Pennsylvania. New Yorker work: February 17, 1940, March 9, 1940, June 8, 1941, and August 30, 1941. His work appeared in many publications, including The Saturday Evening Post, Esquire, The Country Gentleman, and Colliers. Key collection (self published) Don’t Get Polite with Me.

*Chris Wheeler’s fabulous site also has a scan of Price’s book (including the back cover), but I have to admit the cover never registered in my brain’s cartoon catalog. Now, having registered it, the book becomes a must-have for the Spill‘s library.  

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A Daily Shouts By…

Sara Lautman, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2016, contributed yesterday’s Daily Shouts.

 

 

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist/Cartoon

 

An Avi Steinberg summer vacation/global warming cartoon. Mr. Steinberg began contributing to The New Yorker in 2012.  More about him here on Jane Mattimoe’s Case For Pencils.

 

 

The Tilley Watch: The New Yorker Issue Of April 1, 2019; MoCCA Fest Event Of Note: Mort Gerberg And Friends (Danny Shanahan, Marisa Acocella, Bob Eckstein, And Michael Maslin); Today’s New Yorker Daily Cartoonist: Christopher Weyant; Today’s Bonus Daily Cartoonist: Barry Blitt

The Cover: it’s a treat to have Bruce McCall’s work back on the cover. You can read about it here (and see an early version of the cover).

The Cartoonists:

The Cartoons:

And speaking of treats, here are some of this issue’s cartoons that especially caught my eye:

Chris Weyant’s plumbing drawing (p.52). It reminded me, in the best possible way, of Jack Ziegler’s classic 1980 drawing Plumbing Trouble of the Gods. Mr. Weyant has delivered a funny, perfectly handled drawing. 

And then there’s David Borchart’s terrific giraffe drawing (p. 66). Perhaps this is the start of something big? Giraffes have never been anywhere as popular as cats and dogs in the cartoon universe (Lars Kenseth has drawn a very funny pug(?) in his all-dog cartoon on page 35). 

Finally, what a blast to come upon George Booth’s drawing in this issue (it’s on page 59). It’s a sunny day when Mr. Booth’s work appears (it’s worth mentioning again here on the Spill that Mr. Booth is the subject of an in-progress documentary film).

Applause for all.

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There are several drawings in the issue that, for some, might require Googling. I’ve always been a believer in “getting” a drawing without assistance. If I don’t get it, I move on (or occasionally ask a friend for help).  Of course, not getting certain New Yorker cartoons is age-old.

A note: this week’s Talk section includes a Sketchpad (it features a color “illustration” by Emily Flake).  A usage reminiscent of the comic strips briefly brought in during the early 1990s under Tina Brown. The Brown era comic strips ran across the entire width of each page (i.e., 6 columns wide), whereas this Sketchpad is 4 columns wide. Below: an example of a strip from the past: a Victoria Roberts piece from the issue of March 28, 1994.

Finally, the beautiful Rea Irvin masthead continues to remain in storage — not even brought out  as some kind of tease for this April 1st issue.  Well, here it is below, as it will be weekly until it reappears in the magazine (I can dream, can’t I?). 

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MoCCA Fest Event Of Note: Mort Gerberg and Friends: Danny Shanahan, Marisa Acocella, and Bob Eckstein. Panel moderated by Michael Maslin

The upcoming Museum of Comic and Cartoon Art (otherwise known as MoCCA) will begin its 2019 Festival on April 6th. A number of New Yorker folks will be participating (and I will note them as the information becomes available). Here’s the announcement of one that just came into the Spill:

 

Mort Gerberg and Friends

 

Mort Gerberg broke into print with irreverent drawings in The Realist in the early ’60s. His social-justice-minded—and bitingly funny—cartoons subsequently appeared in magazines including The New Yorker, Playboy, and the Saturday Evening Post. As a reporter, he’s sketched historic scenes including the women’s marches of the ’60s and the 1968 Democratic National Convention.

He is currently the subject of a retrospective exhibit at the New-York Historical Society, and Fantagraphics Underground Press has recently published the retrospective book Mort Gerberg On the Scene: A 50-Year Cartoon Chronicle. Gerberg will discuss his work in a conversation with friends and colleagues, led by Michael Maslin (Inkspill, The New Yorker) and including New Yorker cartoonists Marisa Acocella, Bob Eckstein and Danny Shanahan.

Garamond Room / 3:00 pm, Saturday, April 6th

Link to MoCCA’s website here for more general info.

Photos above, l-r: Danny Shanahan, Marisa Acocella, and Bob Eckstein

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Today’s New Yorker Daily Cartoon/Cartoonist & Bonus Daily Cartoon/Cartoonist

Christopher Weyant is today’s Daily Cartoonist.  You can see his (Trump) drawing here. 

Mr. Weyant began contributing to The New Yorker in 1998. Link to his website here.

And here’s Barry Blitt’s Bonus Daily cartoon  —  Trump-world-ish .

Mr. Blitt began contributing to The New Yorker in 1994.  Link to his website here.