The Weekend Spill: Next Week’s New Yorker Cover; The Tilley Watch Online, June 8-12, 2020; Very Brief Video Of Interest: Ken Krimstein; Chas Addams Nominated For New Jersey Hall Of Fame; Article Of Interest: Liana Finck

Above is the early-released cover of next week’s issue of The New Yorker by Kadir Nelson. Go here to see what the magazine calls “a closeup examination…of the cover”

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The Tilley Watch Online

An end of week list of New Yorker artists who contributed to newyorker.com features.

June 8-12, 2020:

The Daily Cartoon: Victor Varnado, Maddie Dai, Tim Hamilton, Elisabeth McNair, Liz Montague.

Daily Shouts: Jason Adam Katzenstein with Kashana Cauley. Mr. K. also contributed, with two others, to another DS piece this week).

…and Barry Blitt’s Kvetchbook.

All the above, and so much more, can be found here.

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Very Brief Video Of Interest: Ken Krimstein

Here’s a 35 second video showing New Yorker cartoonist Ken Krimstein finishing up a drawing. Don’t know about you, but I really enjoy watching people draw.

Mr. Krimstein, a New Yorker contributor since August of 2000, is the author of the acclaimed Three Lives of Hannah Arendt.

Visit Mr. Krimstein’s website here.

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Charles Addams Nominated For New Jersey Hall Of Fame

The New Jersey Hall Of Fame may soon include Westfield born Charles Addams.  Read about it here.

Here’s Mr. Addams’ entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Charles Addams (Born in Westfield, New Jersey, January  7, 1912. Died September 29, 1988, New York City. New Yorker work: 1932 – 1988 * the New Yorker has published his work posthumously. One of the giants of The New Yorker’s  stable of artists.  Key cartoon collections: While all of Addams’ collections are worthwhile, here are three that are particular favorites; Homebodies (Simon & Schuster, 1954), The Groaning Board (Simon & Schuster, 1964), Creature Comforts (Simon & Schuster, 1981). In 1991 Knopf published The World of Chas Addams, a retrospective collection. A biography, Charles Addams: A Cartoonist’s Life, by Linda Davis, was published in 2006 by Random House. Visit the Addams Foundation website for far more information : http://www.charlesaddams.com/

Here, just for fun, is the Spill‘s map (originally posted in 2016) showing other New Jersey born New Yorker contributors.

(click on map to expand it).

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Article Of Interest: Liana Finck

From The New York Times, June 14th, “How A New Yorker Cartoonist Spends Her Sundays” — we are informed that this interview with Liana Finck originally took place in January and was updated in March.

Ms. Finck’s latest book is Excuse Me: Cartoons, Complaints, And Notes To Self (Random House).

 

 

Victor Varnado: “How I Became A New Yorker Cartoonist”; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon; Revisiting A Video Of Interest: Jenny Kroik; Al Jaffee’s Last MAD Fold-In

I’m always interested in hearing every New Yorker cartoonist’s story of their first sale to the magazine. It’s a “moment” they’ll never forget. Here’s Victor Varnado talking about his.

Mr. Varnado’s first New Yorker cartoon appeared in the issue of July 8, 2019.  Visit his website here.

And as long as we’re talking about Mr. Varnado…he’s Today’s Daily Cartoonist.

See his cartoon here.

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Revisiting A Video Of Interest: Jenny Kroik

From The 92nd Street Y,  this brief video of New Yorker cover artist, Jenny Kroik.

(The video originally posted in Feb of 2019, reposted by Viewing NYC  June 12, 2020).

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The Spill has always had a soft spot for MAD and its artists; the magazine, as I’ve said before, surely inspired numerous budding New Yorker cartoonists (including this one) over the years, and in more recent times published a number of New Yorker artists.

Although Al Jaffee’s work never appeared in The New Yorker, he did submit covers a ways back (I remember seeing at least one terrific cover submission at a MoCCA gallery show in SoHo ages ago). Mr. Jaffee, who was responsible for MAD’s iconic fold-in, recently announced his retirement (at age 99). Below is his very last one. Read more (and see more) here on The Forward.

 

The Weekend Spill: New Yorker-Centric Books Stepping Up; Article Of Interest: “Behind The Covers”; The Online Tilley Watch, June 1-5, 2020

New Yorker-Centric Books Stepping Up

Here at Spill headquarters we ran out of bookshelf space quite awhile ago; even the places to “temporarily” place them have become crowded. A few weeks ago, a few old favorites and new favorites — all New Yorker-centric (but one) — began being placed at the bottom step of our thirteen hallway steps. Then a few more books were placed on the next step up, and so on and so on, until eleven steps were filled (not so that we couldn’t continue to use the steps as steps — the books take up approximately half the width of each step). With just two empty steps left, I’m beginning to wonder: where next.

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Article Of Interest: “Behind The Covers”

From Otega Daily Times, June 8, 2020, “Behind The Covers” — this article on filmmaker Sally Williams, whose Stevenson Lost And Found is a must-see for all those who love New Yorker cartoons.

Here’s James Stevenson’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

James Stevenson Born, NYC, 1929. Died, February 17, 2017, Cos Cob, Connecticut. New Yorker work: March 10, 1956 -. Stevenson interned as an office boy at The New Yorker in the mid 1940s when he began supplying ideas for other New Yorker artists. Nine years later he was hired a full-time ideaman, given an office at the magazine and instructed not to tell anyone what he did. He eventually began publishing his own cartoons and covers as well as a ground-breaking Talk of the Town pieces (ground breaking in that the pieces were illustrated). His contributions to the magazine number over 2000. Key collections: Sorry Lady — This Beach is Private! ( MacMillan, 1963), Let’s Boogie ( Dodd, Mead, 1978). Stevenson was a children’s book author, with roughly one hundred titles to his credit. He was a frequent contributor to the Op-Ed page of The New York Times, under the heading Lost and Found New York. Stevenson’s The Life, Loves and Laughs of Frank Modell, published in 2013, is essential reading. Sally Williams’ 2019 documentary film, Stevenson Lost & Found is essential viewing.

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An end of week listing of New Yorker artists contributing to newyorker.com features

The Daily Cartoon: Yasin Osman, Victor Varnado, Tim Hamilton, Adam Douglas Thompson, Elisabeth McNair.

Daily Shouts:  Ali Fitzgerald, Emily Flake.

…and Barry Blitt’s Kvetchbook.

To see all the above, and more, link here.

 

Thurber Thursday: The Seal On The T-Shirt; Blitt In Conversation; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Thurber Thursday: The Seal On The T-Shirt

Thurber’s “All right, have it your way — you heard a seal bark!” published in The New Yorker January 30, 1932 was a moment: a moment for Thurber, a moment for The New Yorker, and a moment for cartoon art (and judging by the above photo of a fave t-shirt: a moment for merchandising). According to Thurber biographer Burton Bernstein:

“By the middle of 1932, the barking seal on the headboard was the most talked-about drawing of the year, and its creator had attracted a sizable following, sizable enough so that Harper & Brothers decided it was time to [bring] out a collection of Thurber art called, aptly, The Seal In The Bedroom and Other Predicaments.” 

By detouring around the standard polished drawings of cartoonists, and drawing his “unbaked cookie” people (as Dorothy Parker described Thurber people in her introduction to The Seal In The Bedroom) Thurber widened the understanding and acceptance of what a cartoon could be (and should be, depending on the artist).

The drawing  continues to pop up whenever Thurber’s art is discussed, and I have to add that it seems whenever his art is discussed there’s always an asterisk of sorts accompanying the discussion as here where the blogger says, “He should not be judged using professional criteria.” Well why shouldn’t he be judged using professional criteria (whatever that means).  However Thurber’s art is described, however it is judged, it is, to quote Ms. Parker when discussing the Seal drawing: “Mad, I don’t say. Genius, I grant you.”

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Blitt In Conversation

From The National Arts Club, “An Evening With New Yorker Cover Artist Barry Blitt”

Mr. Blitt will be in conversation with his editor at The New Yorker, Francoise Mouly.

His entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Barry Blitt  Born in Montreal. New Yorker work: January 10, 1994 -. His first contribution to the magazine was a cover, one of many to come for the magazine. His cover, “Politics of Fear” for the issue of July 21, 2008 was and remains a cause celebre. His first cartoon appeared December 18, 2006. He was awarded a Pulitzer in 2020 for editorial cartooning. Website: barryblitt.com Mr. Blitt’s Wikipedia entry (with personal and professional history).

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

From Victor Varnado, who began contributing to The New Yorker  in July of 2019, on helpful signposts.

 

 

 

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker (Double) Issue, July 8 & 15, 2019; Today’s Daily Cartoonist’s Cartoon

The Cover: A hot dog cart guy gets some beach time on Peter De Seve’s cover.  Read the Cover Story here.

The Cartoonists:

The Newbies: Making their New Yorker print debut this week: Victor Varnado and Akeem Roberts. They become the record-setting nineteenth and twentieth new cartoonists entering the magazine’s stable of artists this year and the forty-fifth and forty-sixth new artists brought in under cartoon editor Emma Allen’s stewardship, begun in May of 2017.

The Cartoons: Brief thoughts on some of the thirteen cartoons in the issue:

Roz Chast’s Ordinary Kreskin drawing (p. 37).  Love Ms. Chast’s right-to-the-point drawings, like this one. Perhaps not so unusual, but noticeable: she’s drawn Mr. Kreskin with five fingers (a lot of cartoonists find four will do for their cartoon characters). 

Liana Finck’s talking baby (p. 44).  A terrific twist on an end-of-life sentiment. I found myself wondering if it would’ve been equally successful had the baby been talking to another baby.

Ed Steed’s hammered drawing (p.54).  At first glance on my laptop, before zooming in on the drawing I thought that Mr. Steed had done a mash-up drawing with George Booth. If you squint your eyes, it’s a very Boothian room (the perspective, the hanging ceiling lamp, the floorboards, wall objects). 100% Steedian is the idea itself and the Steedian happily hammering woman.

My confused initial take on seeing the drawing leads me to toss out a suggestion. There’s been plenty written on this site about cartoon collaboration, but those duets have involved a writer teamed with an artist (or two artists collaborating) with just one person doing the drawing.  Howz about for fun we see some artists team-up and create a drawing or two with multiple styles in one frame. Some suggestions: Chast/Finck, Dator/Donnelly,  Hwang/Shanahan, Sipress/Allenby,  Kenseth/Koren…just a thought. (Liza Donnelly and I had a ton ‘o’ fun doing a series of mash-up full-page graphic pieces for our 2009 collection, Cartoon Marriage)  

Paul Noth’s line of succession drawing (p. 58). Mr. Noth delivers a great drawing.  I only wish it had been given more breathing room (such as Mr. Steed’s). 

Robert Leighton’s drawing (p.32) features a caption that would probably be right at home in a positive thinking seminar.  Yet another Leighton drawing destined for many a refrigerator.   

Karen Sneider’s funny fish in bed recalls the classic George Price drawing published in the magazine’s issue of December 21, 1963

Rea Irvin: Mr. Irvin (with Harold Ross and his then-wife, Jane Grant) was a founder of The New Yorker‘s graphic architecture. Consider his adapted typeface (the so-called Irvin typeface) that is part of the magazine’s DNA, the breadth of cartoon worlds he encouraged as art supervisor, his department heading designs, and his numerous covers (including, of course, the magazine’s brilliant first that gave us Eustace Tilley). Tis a puzzlement that his iconic heading for the Talk Of The Town remains under a tarp. Here it is below, and here’s where you can read about its removal in 2017.

 

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist’s Cartoon

Singin’ under the drip from Amy Kurzweil, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2016. Visit her website here.