The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of May 25, 2020: CBS Sunday Morning’s Mini-Slideshow; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

It’s become (almost) the norm during these strange days, weeks, and months that the online digital edition of The New Yorker is not as yet posted by this time of day (early morning that is). Back in the pre-shutdown days it usually appeared in the wee hours (usually around 3 a.m.). There was even a time before that when it was posted, in a sort of dramatic reveal, at the stroke of midnight.

I’ll post more about the new issue later in the day when I have the online issue in front of me. If possible I like seeing the cartoons as they appear on the magazine’s pages before saying a thing about them. I’ve already seen them this morning as they appear in the slideshow found on this page and, despite what I just said about commenting, have already said something about one of the drawings.

Update: The digital issue was all ready to go this mornin (May 19). A few additions to the Monday Tilley Watch below, as well as some content removed.

The Cover: I had a hunch we’d see a Barry Blitt cover much sooner than later following his Pulitzer…and bingo!

Read the short Q&A with him here about the cover.

The Cartoonists:  I’ve * the two cartoonists who are newbies, Kate Isenberg and Suzy Becker. The two newbies are the seventh and eighth new cartoonists to join the stall this year and the sixtieth and sixty-first to be brought in under Emma Allen’s cartoon editorship that began in May of 2017.

  Ellis Rosen, Liana Finck, Zachary Kanin, P.C. Vey, Edward Koren, Victoria Roberts, Teresa Burns Parkhurst, Navied Mahdavian, Hartley Lin, Tom Toro, Elisabeth McNair, *Kate Isenberg*, Roz Chast, Sofia Warren, Jared Nangle,*Suzy Becker*

The Cartoons:

Really enjoyed Victoria Robert‘s celebrity drawing and caption, as well as Edward Koren‘s family cliff-climbing outing. Lovely drawings. Also catching my eye: Elisabeth McNair‘s fun take on the famous Magritte pipe (This Is Not A Pipe).  and Jared Nangle‘s Jack-In-The-Box.

 

The Rea Irvin Talk Masthead Watch: Mr. Irvin’s classic Talk masthead (below) is still in storage…but hopefully not forever. Read about it here.

_________________________________________________________________

CBS Sunday Morning’s Mini-Slideshow

CBS Sunday Morning ran a mini slideshow of three coronvirus theme New Yorker cartoons on yesterday’s broadcast. Cartoonists responsible for the three drawings: Roz Chast, Victoria Roberts, and Danny Shanahan.

The show has been attentive to New Yorker cartoonists over the years, with several profile pieces, including this one from 2017 and this one from 2009.

_____________________________________________________________________

Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon 

Ali Solomon on a facsimile.

Ms. Solomon has been contributing to The New Yorker since November of 2018. See more of her work here.

 

 

 

 

 

The Weekend Spill: From The Spill’s Library: A Look At New Yorker Biographies (Etc.); The Tilley Watch Online, The Week Of May 11-15, 2020; Joe Dator’s Animation

 

From The Spill’s Library: A Look At New Yorker Biographies (Etc.)

If you’ve been spending as much time as I have online, you’ve seen multiple postings by individuals of their personal library (or parts of). Since visiting my fave bookstore is out of the question for now, I’ve found  browsing book collections by others a ton ‘o fun.  I’ve seen a number of (possible) must-have books over the past few weeks — books I didn’t know existed, or books I’d forgotten about. Over the years, I’ve done a few posts on what’s on the Spill’s shelves. Thurber biographies most recently, and not too long ago, a few of Thurber’s books here at Spill headquarters.

Below you’ll see another group that is ordered by subject (the subjects being folks who were or are New Yorker contributors).  This group of books is an arm’s length from where I sit; I like being able to lean back in my office chair and grab a needed title. I’ve included the whole of the Spill‘s E.B  White collection (mostly books by him, and the great White bio by Scott Elledge) because much of his work seems (to me) to fit into autobiography. The A-Z section begins just to the right of Katharine White’s Onward And Upward in the Garden with Renata Adler’s Gone. Not everything New Yorker contributor/autobiographical/biographical is shown here. Books by the subjects (that is, books by New Yorker contributors) are on the other side of my desk — not arm’s length, but close enough. There’s plenty of autobiographical material in many of them (the Updike and Roth books alone take up a couple of shelves). There are also books that haven’t yet found a shelf (I need to build more). But the ones shown here are the core — the go-to books that help me determine what was what and who was who at The New Yorker.

The Ross section includes a title that might cause some head-scratching: Good Food For Bad Stomachs by Sara M. Jordan, M.D. & Sheila Hibben. It’s there because the (4 page)  Introduction was written by Harold Ross.

 

 

_______________________________________________________________________

The Tilley Watch Online, May 11-15, 2020

An end of the week listing of New Yorker artists who contributed to newyorker.com features

The Daily Cartoon: Colin Tom, Tom Toro, Lars Kenseth, David Sipress, Elisabeth McNair.

Daily Shouts: Olivia de Recat, Gabrielle Bell.

__________________________________________________________________________

Joe Dator’s Animation

The fab Joe Dator has posted a four minute animation. Mr. Dator had this to say about it on Facebook:

My quarantine project for several weeks has been writing and directing this animated short film, called “EARTH”, about an alien invasion gone wrong. I’m thrilled to finally to be able to show it to you guys!  

See it here.

Joe Dator began contributing to The New Yorker in August of 2006.  Visit his website here.

Thurber Thursday: Of Thurber & Columbustown, And Thurber’s “Passport” To A Speakeasy; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon…And Today’s Daily Shouts Cartoonist

Here’s a favorite Thurber booklet, Of Thurber & Columbustown, described within as  “recollections of Columbus people who had known Thurber.” I purchased it at The Thurber House in Columbus in February of 1987 (on my first of two visits there). According to the Colophon, it was published in the summer of 1984 in an edition of 600. Rosemary O. Joyce, an oral historian, curated and wrote the material, and conducted the interviews. The fab Michael Rosen (who recently produced and edited A Mile And A Half Of Lines: The Art Of James Thurber) designed and produced it. The Foreword is by Thurber’s daughter, Rosemary Thurber.

The booklet’s 36 pages contain photos, a Thurber drawing or two, and, of course those “recollections.” One of my favorite pieces is this 1933 Thurber speakeasy “passport” handed to a fellow named Whit Dillon, who was one of Thurber’s Ohio State University fraternity brothers. Mr. Dillon talks about acquiring the passport:

“And those were the days of Prohibition. In the evenings, the four of us, and occasionally Jim, would go to dinner at the Algonquin and then to one of the speakeasies. In fact, one of the things I remember most about Jim, was that he knew every speakeasy in New York…one night he couldn’t go with us, so he left me this note — his autograph, the dog — to take to a speakeasy he’d told us about, whose name was apparently Tony.” 

Tony, was most likely Tony Soma, proprietor of Tony’s.

______________________________________________________________

Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

From Tom Toro: it’s sort of a beautiful day.

Mr. Toro began contributing to The New Yorker in 2010. Visit his website here

 

____________________________________________________________

Today’s Daily Shouts Cartoonist

From Gabrielle Bell: “I Got A Cat”

Visit her website here.

 

 

 

Thurber Thursday; Book On The Horizon: Tom Toro’s First Kids Book; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon; Today’s Daily Shouts Cartoonist: Olivia de Recat…And Yesterday’s: Sara Lautman

Thurber Thursday

Above are all the (specifically) Thurber reference books in the Spill cartoon library. Thurber of course makes appearances in numerous New Yorker-centric books, such as Ross And The New Yorker; Genius In Disguise; Ross, The New Yorker & Me, etc., etc.), but these are the core group examining Thurber’s life.

Of the above, I use three on a regular basis: Bowden’s James Thurber: A Bibliography, Burton Bernstein’s Thurber: A Biography, and Harrison Kinney’s James Thurber: His Life and Times. Of the remaining titles, Helen Thurber & Edward Weeks’ Selected Letter of James Thurber has long been a favorite. The more recent volume of letters by Harrison Kinney & Rosemary Thurber is almost (for me) like Volume 2 to Mr. Kinney’s massive Thurber biography. It’s been incredibly helpful filling in some admittedly weedsy questions I come up with.

The book on the far left is part of Twayne’s United States Author Series (Thurber’s is #62). While this is a good bare-bones read, I’ve found other titles in the series helpful for biographical info needed on others in The New Yorkersphere. Peter DeVries volume is an example ((#448). Another is Philip Wylie’s (#285) — it came in handy during my Peter Arno research.

All of these books are within an arm’s reach from my work table on the chance there’s a Thurber emergency.

________________________________________________________

News from Tom Toro of his first kids book, out May 12th, from Little, Brown.

This from the publisher:

Two children bring home a pet porcupine, but they can only keep her if she’s house-trained! After a whirlwind of increasingly zany approaches, the kids learn that sometimes the best way to solve a problem is to ask nicely. With Tom’s wit and dynamic artwork, this delightful story about learning to pee will bring joy and heart to young readers.

Here’s Mr. Toro’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Tom Toro (self portrait  & bio courtesy of Mr. Toro) Born in Richmond, California on May 22, 1982. Graduated valedictorian from El Cerrito High School and matriculated to Yale. Edited cartoons for The Yale Herald and won a national championship in lightweight rowing in 2002, elected captain of the rowing team in 2004. Earned a degree cum laude in art history specializing in cinema studies. Attended NYU Film School for two years, shooting shorts and features that went to Sundance, Tribeca and Cannes. Began submitting cartoons to The New Yorker in 2007, first got published in 2010 – after the 610th try. Also a writer of literary fiction, short stories, screenplays and children’s picture books of the “unpublished” variety [Ed.: until now!]. New Yorker work: May 24, 2010 – . Visit his website here.

__________________________________________________________

Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Paul Noth on time travel in the time of Trump.

Mr. Noth began contributing to The New Yorker in 2004. Visit his website here.

___________________________________________________________

Today’s Daily Shouts Cartoonist…

From Olivia de Recat, “My New Friends!”

— Ms. de Recat has been contributing her cartoons to The New Yorker since February of 2018. Visit her website here.

 

…and Yesterday’s 

From Sara Lautman, “P.S.A. Posters For Living Indoors”

— Ms. Lautman has been contributing to The New Yorker since March of 2016. Visit her website here.

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of April 13, 2020; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

To my readers: This being the time we’re in, the online issue has not yet been posted (as of 11:00am), so what follows is a shortened version of The Monday Tilley Watch. Long-time visitors might recall I prefer first sightings of new cartoons in situ, but in order to provide at least some basic info, I’ve gone to the slideshow (it’s posted here — scroll way down).

The Cover: The last time we saw a Pascal Campion cover (Jan.6, 2020) the Spill pointed out its uncanny resemblance to an Arthur Getz cover from 1965. This week Mr. Campion speaks with The New Yorker‘s art editor, Francoise Mouly, about Mr. Getz’s (and Sempe’s) influence on his work.

 

The Cartoonists:

The Cartoons:

Just as The New Yorker ran a good number of war cartoons during World War II (enough to fill an Album of war cartoons), we are beginning to see a number of corona virus-related cartoons during this particular war. In the latest issue, five of the eleven cartoons are tied-in to the virus, with another few possibly so.

Update after the digital edition was posted: a color strip by Ed Steed is also virus-related.

The Rea Irvin Masthead Talk Masthead Watch:

Without access to the digital edition, I can’t say for sure that Christoph Niemann’s Talk masthead redraw(!) still appears instead of Mr. Irvin’s iconic masthead.  If I had to guess, I’d say the real deal (just below) is still on a shelf, waiting to be dusted off.

Update after the digital edition was posted: the redraw remains…for now.

______________________________________________________________________

Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Jeremy Nguyen on what everyone’s doing again.

Mr. Nguyen began contributing to The New Yorker in

2017. Visit his website here.