More MoCCA Today (With Photos) & “My First MoCCA”; David Sipress On A 1969 Harvard Protest

More MoCCA Today

At least three New Yorker cartoonist events scheduled today: Liana Finck in conversation with Gabrielle Bell; a “spotlight” on Mark Alan Stamaty; Emily Flake as part of a panel, “Narratives On Motherhood”; cover artist Ivan Brunetti in a panel on “Comics and the Teaching Artist” (right: Ms. Bell and Ms. Finck today. Courtesy of Stephen Nadler).

And more photos from today (all courtesy of Liza Donnelly, with the exception of the Mark Alan Stamaty photo.  That’s another courtesy of Stephen Nadler):

Top row, l-r: Peter Kuper, Felipe Galindo, Mark Parisi, Ellis Rosen.

Middle row: Arnold Roth & Caroline Roth, Liza Donnelly, Keith Knight.

Bottom: Mark Alan Stamaty (l), and Bill Kartalopoulos, who, among other things, is MoCCA’s Programming Director, and Series Editor for The Best American Comics series. 

My First MoCCA:  A Personal Take

Judging by the scene I dove into at yesterday’s MoCCA Fest, the appetite for, and practice of comics and cartoons is booming. The place (the Metropolitan West on West 46th Street) was at capacity, loud and energized. I took in the must-see Cartooning For Peace exhibit on the second floor (curated by The New Yorker cartoonist, Liza Donnelly) then immediately ran into Dick Buchanan (who for quite some time has been sharing his voluminous cartoon file via Mike Lynch’s site). Mr. Buchanan had told me earlier in the week  that he’d be at the fest, and would bring along a copy of a book I’d never seen before:  Bernard Wiseman’s Cartoon Countdown (published in 1959). Mr. Wiseman contributed 197 cartoons to The New Yorker, from April 19, 1947 – June 11. 1960.

In the pr copy on the first page:

This is the first book of cartoons devoted exclusively  to he Conquest of Space. Let the Russians Match That! 

(to the right: The Cartooning For Peace Exhibit)

With  thanks to Mr. Buchanan for Cartoon Countdown, it was on to a tour of the fest.

 

  The illustrator Tom Bloom was seen engaged in conversation with an exhibitor, the illustrator/educator, Steve Guernaccia blew by (he’s hard to miss, sartorially). The multitude of people, of tables laden with products bearing graphic images, posters, cards, etc., etc., was astounding. Along with me on the tour was one of my co-panelists, Danny Shanahan.  We were moving along at a good pace with the flow of the crowd when a familiar book cover on the New York Review Comics table got our attention: Saul Steinberg’s recently reissued Labyrinth (also on the table were a number of Maira Kalaman titles).  I bet Steinberg would’ve enjoyed the scene passing by his book.

Closing in on the slotted time for our panel with Mort Gerberg, we headed over to Ink48 on 11th Avenue, where the panels took place. Ran into Stephen Nadler of Attempted Bloggery  who reminded us that Mark Alan Stamaty was signing his anniversary edition of MacDoodle Street.

Co-panelist Bob Eckstein awaited us in the Garamond Room, where we were soon joined by Marisa Acocella, and the man of the hour, Mort Gerberg. Spotted in our audience were New Yorker contributors,  R. Sikoryak, and Sophia Warren, as well as friend to all comics creators, Karen Greene of Columbia University. Below photos of the panel courtesy of Mr. Nadler (l-r, Danny Shanahan, Bob Eckstein, myself, Marisa Acocella, and Mr. Gerberg).

One of the fun things to come out of paneling with colleagues is the unexpected nugget or two of New Yorker history. As he discussed selling his first cartoon to The New Yorker back in 1965 , Mr. Gerberg told us — and this is something I had never heard, and didn’t realize was even possible — that he had talked the then art editor, James Geraghty into allowing what was supposed to be a bought idea of Mr. Gerberg’s to become a bought drawing. New Yorker history buffs know that it was routine at the magazine back then to buy ideas and give them to established cartoonists. It’s quite a thing that Mr. Gerberg, with his first sale to the magazine, was not only able to buck that well-entrenched system, but to deliver the full page below (published in October 20,1965).

  After our panel concluded we panelists stayed in the same room to attend the next panel,  “Professional Development 101: Art Directors Roundtable.” How could we not –it included our very own cartoon editor, Emma Allen. As we moved into the audience we spotted fellow colleagues, Kendra Allenby, Tracey Berglund, and cartoonist, Marc Bilgrey. Ms. Allen was joined by Matt Lubchansky (of The Nib), Alexandra Zsigmond (formerly The New York Times), Will Varner (formerly Buzzfeed), and artist/educator, Viktor Koen, who moderated.  The “101” in the panel title was accurate — we heard what the scene was like for today’s beginning illustrator/artists trying to break in. One piece of advice from Ms. Allen that stood out for me:  something that would make her laugh while looking at [written and drawn] humor for four hours in a day, had an excellent shot.

By the way, the place was packed.

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David Sipress On A Harvard Protest In 1969

Mr. Sipress, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 1998, has a Personal History piece on newyorker.com: “Fake News, 1969: My Slightly Infamous Role In The Harvard Antiwar Protests”

 

 

Must See: George Booth Exhibit at The Society of Illustrators

Here are a bunch of photos taken at last night’s opening reception for The Society of Illustrators exhibit, George Booth: A Cartoonist’s Life, curated by J.J. Sedelmaier

A ton of original George Booth covers and drawings in one place. What more could anyone ask for?  It’s a wonderful show. Go see it.

Above left, Danny Shanahan with Seth Fleishman (and right behind Mr. Fleishman is Stephen Nadler who runs Attempted Bloggery). Photo right: seated, John Cuneo, with the Director of the Society of Illustrators, Anelle Miller. Behind them is Felipe Galindo, and Stephen Nadler speaking with the cartoonist, Marc Bilgrey.

Below: two similar group photos. Can you spot the difference?

Top group photo: Mike Lynch, Michael Maslin, Liza Donnelly, Danny Shanahan, Jane Mattimoe, Felipe Galindo, George Booth, Mort Gerberg, Sam Gross, Ellis Rosen and Hilary Campbell.In the second group photo, Mike Lynch has disappeared and been replaced by John Cuneo, who is between Liza Donnelly and Danny Shanahan).

Below right: Seth Fleishman and the New Yorker‘s cartoon editor, Emma Allen.

Below: animator, Bill Plympton. Right: Eric Lewis

Above left: the show’s curator, J.J. Sedelmaier. Right: the Booth family

Below: Mike Lynch with Gina Kovarsky, daughter of the late very great New Yorker cartoonist and cover artist, Anatol Kovarsky

(photo courtesy of Mike Lynch)

Below: George Booth, with the illustrator,Tom Bloom in the background — he’s the fellow with the beard. (This photo courtesy of Stephen Nadler). 

Above left: Sam Gross.  Above right: Felipe Galindo with Colin Stokes, the New Yorker‘s assistant cartoon editor.

Below: Liza Donnelly, George Booth

 

–All photos above by Liza Donnelly, except where noted. My thanks to her for being the Spill’s official photographer.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fave Photo of the Day: Nurit Karlin and Liza Donnelly; Eldon Dedini’s Concours d’Elegance Posters; Latest Addition to Ink Spill’s Archives: A 1926 New Yorker Advertising Booklet

Below’s a photo of two wonderful New Yorker cartoonists taken this morning in Tel Aviv. On the left is Liza Donnelly (no stranger to the Spill)  and to the right is Nurit Karlin, who we don’t see enough of here.  I think of Ms. Karlin’s work (as I think of Ms. Donnelly’s work) in the Thurber school: a simple line beautifully executing a solid idea.

Here’s Ms. Karlin’s entry on the Spill’s A-Z: Born in Jerusalem. NYer work: 1974 – . Collection: No Comment (Scribner, 1978). For more on Karlin see pp 124 -130 of Liza Donnelly’s Funny Ladies : The New Yorker’s Greatest Women Cartoonists and Their Cartoons (Prometheus Books, 2005)

photo: Daniel Kenet/Gretchen Maslin

 

 

 

 

 

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From Attempted Bloggery, June 4, 2017, “Eldon Dedini: Concours d’Elegance” — Stephen Nadler, who specializes in digging deep, takes a look at some lesser-known  work by the great Mr. Dedini. See it all here.

 

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Tom Bloom, indefatigable collector and illustrator, dropped by the Spill’s world headquarters yesterday, bearing a splendid gift: May we say a few words about our contemporaries” — a 23 page booklet, bound with a string cord,  printed on “nice” paper (that is to say, it’s not lightweight bond).  Aimed at advertisers, it offers a survey of other publications in the New York market (The New York Times, The World, The Herald Tribune, etc.) before finally getting around to the virtues of advertising in The New Yorker. The pages are adorned with a good number of  New Yorker spot drawings by such artists as  Alice Harvey, Hans Stengel, Helen Hokinson, Alan Dunn, and the one-and-only Rea Irvin, who supplies the Eustace Tilleys . 

The copy shown below states the New Yorker had been publishing for a “scant twenty months”  — placing the booklet’s vintage approximately October of 1926. 

My thanks to Tom for this fabulous addition to the archives.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Time-Out with Helen Hokinson

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Here are two obscure Helen Hokinson book jackets, courtesy of Tom Bloom, without whom the Ink Spill Library would be a far less interesting place. The title above was published in 1929 by Coward-McCann.  The title below was published in 1933 by MacMillan.  Mr. Bloom had this to say about What Shall I Eat?:

 

“[It’s] a curious item–in that it is a very bare-bones production. The back of the dust jacket is totally blank, and the interior pages take
a little time to get to the body of the book. The inside flap describes the illustrations by Helen Hokinson “in the style of her famous
New Yorker Sketches.” This is basically a dietary book with recipes and planned meals, 10 illustrations, about the size of a small novel.

 

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Here’s Ms. Hokinson’s entry on Ink Spill‘s “New Yorker Cartoonists A-Z”:
helen_hokinson
Helen Hokinson Born, Illinois, 1893; died, Washington, D.C., 1949. New Yorker work: 1925 -1949, with some work published posthumously. All of Hokinson’s collections are wonderful, but here are two favorites. Her first collection: So You’re Going To Buy A Book! (Minton, Balch & Co, 1931) and what was billed as “the final Hokinson collection”: The Hokinson Festival (Dutton & Co., 1956)

Latest Addition to Ink Spill’s Archives: “Drawings of the Theatre 1927” with Arno, Karasz, Birnbaum, and Covarrubias; More Spills: Bob Eckstein Cracks Wise for The New York Times on Debate Night; Donnelly Live-Tweet Draws Debate for CBS News

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Thanks to the generosity of the illustrator Tom Bloom (who is an  indefatigable collector of cartoon-related books & ephemera)  Drawings of the Theatre 1927 has been added to the archives. I’d not heard of or seen this until a few weeks ago. Published just two years after Arno started at The New Yorker it’s an excellent example of how quickly his star was rising in the publishing world. New Yorker aficionados will also recognize some of the company he kept: the great cover artist, Ilonka Karasz (187 covers between 1925 and 1973)  Abe Birnbaum (141 covers and 9 cartoons in a career that lasted from 1929 through 1974) and Miguel Covarrubias (7 cartoons, all published in 1925).

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This is a small pamphlet, measuring 4″ x 6″, that opens up like a file folder.   Four attached postcards are slipped into the right side, each postcard featuring one of these four New Yorker artists. . The work of the two non-New Yorker artists, Gil Spear and Samuel Rogers appear on the pamphlet itself — those portraits you see running vertically along the right edge.

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More Spills Icon Edited…Bob Eckstein has posted on Facebook: “I hope you watch [tonight’s] debate along with The New York times website where they will have me doing commentary, doodles and cracking wise.”   (Link to Mr. Eckstein’s exploits on the Times’ site  here).

While you’re waiting to link to the Times, don’t forget to pre-order his forthcoming book, Footnotes From The World’s Greatest Bookstores: True Tales and Lost Moments from Book Buyers, Book Sellers, and Book Lovers.  Out October 4th. Eckstein's books

 

 

 

 

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…And  Liza Donnelly will be Live Tweet-Drawing the debate for CBS News.  You can find her work on Instagram:

and on Twitter: