The Monday Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of August 19, 2019; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon; Sara Lautman’s Daily Shouts

The Cover: Kara Walker’s early release Toni Morrison cover was mentioned here previously.

The Cartoonists & Cartoons:

Good to see Tom Bachtell‘s fab “Spots” work this week…As you can see, there’s another duo effort from Pia Guerra and her husband, Ian Boothby…No Newbie (or Newbies) this week…Cartoon placement (sizing) in this issue: a few look just right (Bruce Kaplan‘s fun beach drawing for instance) and Danny Shanahan‘s uncovered flooring); Liana Finck‘s perhaps needed to be run larger so we could easily make out the lettering on the caps her folks are wearing (this may be an online issue — won’t know til the print copy is in hand); a few drawings would’ve benefited, graphically, by being run smaller. Fewer than average number of cartoons in this issue (just eleven) but we are after all in the waning weeks of summer.

The Spill’s (Please) Bring Back Rea Irvin’s Classic Talk Masthead Campaign: Mr. Irvin’s beautiful iconic masthead (below), sadly disappeared in May of 2017 and was amazingly (amazing to me anyway) replaced by a redrawn(!) version. Read about it here.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Fish in a tube, by J.A.K. who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2014.

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Today’s Daily Shouts

“Mysterious Summer Abrasions: An Investigation” by Sara Lautman, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2016.

The Monday Tilley Watch: the New Yorker Issue of July 23, 2018

Back to a single issue, but not for long. Just one more single week issue before we have another double: dated August 6 & 13. Ah summertime.

This is the first issue of The New Yorker in 23 years without Tom Bachtell’s Talk of The Town illustrations. The illustrations are handled this week by Joao Fazenda. His work, at least going by the illustrations in this issue, seem in the vicinity of the school of Bachtell.  Otto Soglow’s terrific drawings remain, as they have for quite some time, sort of alternating between the modern contributor’s work.

From the Dept. of Just Sayin’ :

18  illustrations this week. Three of those full page, and an additional illustration that is a page-and-a-half.

14 cartoons, none full page.

The Cartoons:

Good sizing/placement of the cartoons this week, with just one drawing that, to my eyes, could’ve used a bit more breathing room (i.e., run larger): Ed Steed’s very nice bees in cars cartoon. Perhaps it reads better in the print version (I’m seeing the digital issue, both on a laptop and a tablet).

Of note in the issue: a Glen Baxter drawing! Even better: it’s a Glen Baxter cowboy drawing! If the Spill gave out best of the issue awards like the fellas do over on Cartoon Companion, Mr. Baxter’s would be pinned with a ribbon.

Irvin Talk Update: 

Rea Irvin’s iconic masthead for The Talk of The Town is still missing (a re-drawn version replaced it. Yes, a re-drawn version.  Read about that here). This is what the original looks like:

And that’s that, til next week.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

New Yorker’s Tom Bachtell Talk of The Town Illustrations End After 23 Years; Article of Interest: Maggie Larson; Personal History: “How many do you send in?”

New Yorker’s Tom Bachtell Talk of The Town Illustrations End After 23 Years

Mr. Bachtell, whose first Talk of The Town illustrations appeared in the New Yorker‘s issue of March 20, 1995, posted the following on Facebook this afternoon:

Tom Bachtell’s website

Mr. Bachtell on A Case For Pencils

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Article of Interest: Maggie Larson

From the Philadelphia Inquirer, July 11, 2018, “This Bryn Mawr grad is part of an exclusive — but growing — group: women cartoonists of the New Yorker”

— this piece on Ms. Larson, who first began contributing to The New Yorker in July of 2017.

Above: Ms. Larson and one of her New Yorker cartoons (from the issue of December 4 2017). 

Link here to Ms. Larson’s website

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Personal History:

“How many do you send in?”

I’ve found that this question is eventually asked in any cartoon-centered conversation with someone curious as to how it works, working for The New Yorker. It’s a question with as many different answers as there are cartoonists.  A rumor was spread some years ago that the magic number was 10: you had to submit 10 a week. No such rule exists, or ever existed. I believe that that number still haunts the cartoon community — why, I don’t know.

This afternoon, while going through cartoon stuff, I ran across a box of index cards from my earliest years as a cartoonist for the magazine. To illustrate my point about sending in 10 cartoons a week, I noticed I had a run of sending in 20+, but there were also weeks of 30+, and then I found a few much higher.  Here’s a cropped photo of the last page of one week’s submissions — the week of March 8, 1978:

 57 submitted. Not one sold to The New Yorker or to any other publications that saw the work after the New Yorker (I think those red dots indicate drawings I felt might work for some other magazines). I don’t remember any of these cartoons, but judging by the captions, I’m not surprised they failed to be placed. For me, rejected work is best quickly forgotten; by the time drawings are rejected (or bought, if I’m lucky enough) I’ve already moved on to the next week’s batch, however many drawings that turns out to be.