Film Of Interest: Wes Anderson’s New Yorker-ish “The French Dispatch”; Video Of Interest: Liza Donnelly On Oscar’s Red Carpet; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon (And Yesterday’s); New York Times Piece Of Interest: Tina Brown

Film Of Interest: Wes Anderson’s New Yorker-ish “The French Dispatch”

From The New Yorker‘s Culture Desk, February 11, 2020,  “A Look At Wes Anderson’s New, New Yorker-Inspired Film” this should be fun.

Above: the poster, which resembles a certain magazine’s cover. Read more here.

Above: Bill Murray as the magazine’s editor, Arthur Howitzer, Jr. — a character “inspired by Harold Ross, The New Yorker‘s founding editor…[with] a dash of A.J. Liebling.”

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Video Of Interest: Liza Donnelly On Oscar’s Red Carpet

From Fab TV, this YouTube video of Liza Donnelly on Oscar’s Red Carpet this past Sunday.

Ms. Donnelly, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 1982, has posted all of her Red Carpet drawings on Medium.

For more info visit Liza Donnelly’s website here.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon (And Yesterday’s)

Brendan Loper on the field of Democratic Presidential candidates.

Mr. Loper began contributing to in 2016.

Yesterday’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon:

Lila Ash on too many caucuses. Ms. Ash began contributing to The New Yorker in 2018. See more of her work here.

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New York Times Magazine Piece Of Interest: Tina Brown

From The New York Times Magazine, “Tina Brown on the future of the royal family” — Don’t be fooled by the title, this piece by Dave Marchese, includes a good bit of New Yorker talk.

Left: Edward Sorel‘s cover for Ms. Brown’s first issue of The New Yorker (October 5, 1992).

 

 

The New Yorker Date & Price Switcheroo; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon (And Yesterday’s); Today’s Daily Shouts Cartoonist; Blitt’s Kvetchbook; New Yorker Cartoonist Newbies 2019

New Yorker Date & Price Switcheroo.

It’s only taken me twenty-two years to notice that the New Yorker switched its cover placement of the issue date and issue price.

Since the very first issue, published February 21, 1925, the issue date appeared top left, and the price upper right. Seventy-three years after that first issue, in the summer of 1998, while Tina Brown was exiting her editorship of the magazine (she announced her departure on July 8th) and the double issue of June 22 & 29th gave way to the next issue, dated July 6, 1998, the date and price placements were switched.  I know, I know: small potatoes compared to the more dramatic changes Ms. Brown instituted.

Below, left: The issue of June 22 & 29, 1998. Owen Smith‘s the cover artist.  On the right, the issue of July 6, 1998. Edward Sorel, cover artist.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon (And Yesterday’s)

Ellie Black on future folks.  Ms. Black has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2019.

Yesterday’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon:

Escaping the cold by Caitlin Cass, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2018.

Visit her website here.

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Today’s Daily Shouts Cartoonist

“The Times Square New Year’s Ball Tells All”

by Ellis Rosen and The New Yorker‘s assistant cartoon editor, Colin Stokes.

 

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 Blitt’s Kvetchbook

“Out With The Auld” — from Mr. Blitt, who has been contributing to The New Yorker since 1992.

Visit his website here.

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Twenty-six cartoonists joined The New Yorker stable of cartoonists this year — a record-breaking number. The issue debut date appears next to each name. 

 

 

Hartley Lin (1.21.19)

Karl Stevens (1.21.19)

Ellie Black (2.11.19)

Liz Montague (3.11.19)

Suerynn Lee ((3.25.19)

Adam Douglas Thompson (4.8.19)

Brooke Bourgeois (4.15.19)

Becky Barnicoat (4.22.19)

Miriam Katin (4.29.19)

Evan Lian (5.6.19)

Kasia Babis (5.20.19)

John Cuneo (5.27.19)…Mr. Cuneo, a New Yorker cover artist, crossed-over to the Cartoon Dept.

Johnny DiNapoli (6.3.19)

Eugenia Viti (6.10 & 17.19)

Lydia Conklin (6.10 & 17.19)

Emily Bernstein (7.1.19)

Seth Roberts & Brian Hawes (7.1.19)…a duo.

Victor Varnado (7.8.19)

Akeem Roberts (7.8.19)

Madeleine Horwath (7.15.19)

Lisa Rothstein (8. 5 & 12. 19)

Yael Green (10.14.19)

Luke Kruger-Howard (11.4.19)

Jared Nangle (12.9.19)

Mo Welch (12.9.19)

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of November 4, 2019

The Cover: Without heading to the Table Of Contents and reading the title for this cover I’m going to guess it’s a comment on city noise. I’ve always felt New Yorker covers should work stand alone, without explanation, or description. This was the practice until Tina Brown’s revamp of the magazine, beginning with the issue of October 5, 1992.

Okay, now to the Table of Contents and the cover’s title: “Noise New York.”

There’s a hint of Steinberg on the cover; the police car beams of flashing lights for instance. Below left, a detail from Steinberg’s March 13, 1978 New Yorker cover, and to the right, a detail from this week’s cover (by Richard McGuire).

 

 

 

 

If you want to read more about Mr. McGuire’s cover, go here.

The Cartoonists:

Some random thoughts on some of the Cartoons & Cartoonists:

So yay! A lot of cartoonists. If we count the two teams (Sofia Warren & J.A.K., and Pia Guerra & Ian Boothby) as one cartoonist per drawing, there are twenty-one contributors.

There’s a newbie: Luke Kruger-Howard, who is the twenty-fourth new member of the magazine’s stable of cartoonists this year and the fiftieth newbie under Emma Allen’s editorship, begun in the Spring of 2017.

There are four bedroom cartoons in the issue: one by Victoria Roberts (page 46), one by the aforementioned Mr. Kruger-Howard (p. 23), one by Will McPhail (p. 36), and one by the aforementioned team of Guerra & Boothby (p. 70). Victoria Roberts’ three little pigs in bed drawing is both funny and touching.  It’s become an instant favorite Roberts cartoon.

Paul Noth has a fine colorful cartoon on page 50.  As mentioned here a number of times, it’s the cartoons that surprise that catch my attention (and often my affection). This is an out-of-left-field drawing that surprises. What more could one ask for.

P.C. Vey specializes in out-of-left-field drawings. His hikers (p. 54) don’t disappoint. I love everything about this drawing, especially the unseen co-hikers’ name (“the Jensons”). Someone ought to frame the original and hang it on a wall.

One can’t see Karl Stevens “Casablanca” drawing (p.39) without recalling others. A quick search on the magazine’s Cartoon Bank turned up five (it’s possible there are more):

Bob Eckstein’s from November 30, 2015

This classic from  Sam Gross, published February 11, 2008

A duo effort by Emily Flake & Rob Kutner, published October 16, 2017 

One by the late great Al Ross, published February 2, 1987.

And this fun one by Julia Suits, published October 30, 2017

 

High on my favorite things to draw are dogs and clouds. It’s only natural then that I’d be partial to a drawing that combines both, such as Amy Hwang’s cartoon on page 31 (her poodles are ever-so-slightly Gahan Wilsonesque).

I can’t see a cloud-based New Yorker drawing — heck, I can’t see clouds — without thinking of Charles Addams’ classic cover of May 19, 1975.

 

Lastly, I appreciate the challenge presented by aerial view drawings such as Sofia Warren & J.A.K’s joint effort on page 28. The last one I recall seeing was this one by David Borchart, published  February 22, 2016.  Then there is this spectacular dizzying cover from Adolph Kronengold, published September 22, 1928.

The Rea Irvin Talk Masthead Watch

Sadly, Mr. Irvin’s iconic Talk masthead drawing (below) remains mothballed. It was replaced by a redraw in 2017 after appearing 92 years.  Read about it here.

 

 

 

Robert Crumb And Aline Kominsky-Crumb At Columbia This Fall; The Tilley Watch Online, July 15-19, 2019; Fave Photo Of The Day: Some New Yorker Folks At The San Diego Comic Con; NYTs Opinion Piece Of Interest: “The Vicious Fun Of America’s Most Famous Literary Circle”

 

Robert Crumb And Aline -Kominsky Crumb At Columbia This Fall

Columbia University’s Curator For Comics and Cartoons, Karen Green, announced at the San Diego Comic Com that Robert Crumb, Aline Kominsky-Crumb, and Peter Bagge will be appearing this Fall at Columbia University…no further info at the moment.  Here’s the article from The Beat, July 20, 2019, “Things Go Off The Rails At The Book Of Weirdo Panel”

Both Mr. Crumb and Ms. Kominsky-Crumb have contributed to The New Yorker.  In 1994, with the magazine was then edited by Tina Brown, Mr. Crumb’s “Elvis Tilley” broke the sixty-eight  year string of Rea Irvin Eustace Tilleys appearing on the anniversary issueFor more Tilley Talk, read my 2008 newyorker.com piece “Tilley Over Time”

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Daily Cartoon Contributors this week: Lars Kenseth, Avi Steinberg, Ellis Rosen, Teresa Burns Parkhurst, and Peter Kuper.

 New Yorker cartoonist Daily Shouts contributors this week:  Jeremy Nguyen (illustrator) with Jiji Lee, P.C. Vey, Ellis Rosen (with Colin Stokes), Olivia de Recat (with Sarah Vollman), Tom Chitty, and Teresa Burns Parkhurst.

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Fave Photo Of The Day

From Jason Chatfield‘s Facebook page, this group photo taken at the San Diego Comic Con.  Four outta five New Yorker  folks are in the line-up. Far left, MAD cartoonist, Todd Clark, then New Yorker contributors Ivan Ehlers, Shannon Wheeler, Lonnie Millsap, and Olivia de Recat.  

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A New York Times Opinion Piece Of Interest

From The New York Times, July 20, 2019, Jennifer Ratner-Rosenhagen’s Opinion piece,  “The Vicious Fun Of America’s Most Famous Literary Circle” 

(photo above from Ink Spill‘s “Posted Notes”)

Exhibit Of Interest: William Steig; Profile Of Interest: Frank Cotham; Today’s Daily Cartoonist: Maddie Dai; A Weekend Shouts By Liana Finck; The Tilley Watch For The New Yorker (Combined) Issue Of June 10 & 17, 2019

Exhibit Of Interest: William Steig

A current exhibit at The Carle Museum focused on William Steig’s classic Sylvester and the Magic Pebble includes “Steig’s preliminary sketches, story boards, and dummy books related to the seminal publication.” Info here.

William Steig’s entry on the A-Z:

Born in Brooklyn, NY, Nov. 14, 1907, died in Boston, Mass., Oct. 3, 2003. In a New Yorker career that lasted well over half a century and a publishing history that contains more than a cart load of books, both children’s and otherwise, it’s impossible to sum up Steig’s influence here on Ink Spill. He was among the giants of the New Yorker cartoon world, along with James Thurber, Saul Steinberg, Charles Addams, Helen Hokinson and Peter Arno. Lee Lorenz’s World of William Steig (Artisan, 1998) is an excellent way to begin exploring Steig’s life and work. New Yorker work: 1930 -2003.

Of Note: From The New Yorker, June 3, 2019, Rumaan Alam’s  “William Steig’s Books Explored The Reality Adults Don’t Want Children To Know About”

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Profile Of Interest: Frank Cotham

From Memphis Magazine, The Well-Drawn World of Frank Cotham— this piece on the long-time contributor to The New Yorker.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist/Cartoon

A Maddie Dai Kingly drawing. Ms. Dai began contributing to The New Yorker in 2017.

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A Weekend Daily Shouts…

…by Liana Finck. Another installment in Ms. Finck’s “Dear Pepper” series.

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The Tilley Watch For The New Yorker (Combined) Issue Of June 10 & 17, 2019

The Cover: A fitting  Bruce Eric Kaplan cover for the “fiction Issue”  — it’s always a pleasure to see one of the magazine’s cartoonists work appear there.  Read more about Mr. Kaplan’s cover here.

More “Tweaking” Of Note: This is the second issue of the magazine in a row not listing the Cover Artist on The Contributors page (Barry Blitt was not credited there last week). The last issue to credit the cover artist (Malika Favre) was the issue of May 27th.  The cover artists are still credited on the table of contents. Example:

As tweaking continues to occur it’s perhaps a good time to recall what the magazine’s Creative Director, Nicholas Blechman told MAGCulture in June of 2017:

The New Yorker is a magazine shaped by time. Very little has changed since the first issue in 1925, and that respect for legacy is part of our visual identity. Since I arrived in 2015, we’ve been fine tuning an incredibly resilient and elegant design. Our road map for design changes in the print magazine is mostly complete. I think the table of contents could be tweaked, and the design of the Fiction page could also be tinkered with. Most of the big innovations you will be seeing at The New Yorker will be online, as we contemplate a web redesign and introduce improvements to The New Yorker Today app.

While I wholeheartedly agree with Mr. Blechman’s first sentence (The New Yorker is a magazine shaped by time) I must disagree with the first half of the sentence that follows:

Very little has changed since the first issue in 1925, and that respect for legacy is part of our visual identity. 

There was in fact an enormous design change (and changes in the magazine’s DNA) beginning with Tina Brown’s first issue, October 5 1992. Here’s a link to Walter Goodman’s September 29, 1992 New York Times piece assessing that issue.

The Cartoonists:

Of Note: The lead cartoon by George Booth, one of the New Yorker‘s all-time great artists, appears on the 50th anniversary of Mr. Booth’s first cartoon in magazine, June 14, 1969 (the Spill will celebrate accordingly on June 14th).

Of the 14 cartoonists in this issue, two are making their New Yorker print debut: Eugenia Viti and Lydia Conklin, making them the 15th and 16th new cartoonists brought into the magazine’s stable in 2019, and the 41st & 42nd to be brought in since Emma Allen became cartoon editor in May of 2017. With 16 new cartoonists, the magazine has now tied the 2016 record for new artists. And, of course, we’re only half-way through the year.

Rea Irvin: Mr. Irvin’s iconic Talk masthead is still a-missin. Read about it here. Here’s the real deal: