More From the Attic: Our Own Baedeker from The New Yorker

  Continuing on from yesterday’s post, pictured above is Our Own Baedeker from The New Yorker (Simon & Schuster, 1947).  Carl Rose supplied ten maps and one hundred and eighty illustrations. The written pieces all ran during World War II. Regular visitors to Ink Spill might well ask, “Why these posts of ancient material all of a sudden?”  The answer

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New Yorker Overseas Editions

  The two paperback books above were part of a series produced for our overseas service men and women during WWII.  Measuring just five-and-half  by four inches, they fit easily into a pocket, duffel bag or backpack.   The eagle-eyed observer will notice that Profiles From the New Yorker features E.B. White’s only New Yorker cover (published April 23, 1932).

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A blast from the past: Meet the Artist

  In 1943,  San Francisco’s M.H. De Young Memorial Museum held an exhibit of artist’s self portraits called “Meet the Artist.”  The catalog, 8 1/2″ x 7 3/4″ is a gem.  Of the 188 artists represented, a number are New Yorker contributors: James Thurber, Saul Steinberg, Otto Soglow, Mischa Richter, Richard Taylor, Alajalov, Whitney Darrow, Jr., Richard Decker, Roberta MacDonald,

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Hokinson’s My Best Girls and more…

(Above, Hokinson’s 1943 cover illustration for Emily Kimbrough’s We Followed Our Hearts to Hollywood)     Today’s Ink Spill was inspired by a Stevereads blog post,  My Best Girls! from July 15, 2011. As the post’s author, Mr. Donoghue, points out, all of Hokinson’s collections are “well worth finding.”  Here then is a checklist of all her collections:   So

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Robert Mankoff and the Benign Violation Theory

From the blog, Westword, July 15, 2011: “Peter McGraw, Humor Research Lab director, takes his comedy theory to the International Humor Conference” (Robert Mankoff content) …and in case you missed it on The New Yorker’s website, here’s Mr. Mankoff’s recent blog post, “Benign Violations and Distant Mishaps”

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