Tonight! Art Out Loud Online Society Of Illustrators Event W/ Liza Donnelly; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon; Chatfield Live!; More Spills: Grant Snider & J.A.K…More About MAD’s Jaffee

Tonight at 6 watch long-time New Yorker cartoonist Liza Donnelly draw live as part of the Society of Illustrators Art Out Loud Online series.  Info here.

Ms. Donnelly’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Liza Donnelly Born, Washington, D.C. New Yorker work: June 21, 1982 – Key book: Funny Ladies: The New Yorker’s Greatest Women Cartoonists and Their Cartoons (Prometheus, 2005). Edited:  Sex & Sensibility: Ten Women Examine the Lunacy of Modern Love…in 200 Cartoons ( Twelve, 2008). Co-authored with Michael Maslin: Husbands & Wives ( Ballantine 1995), Call Me When You Reach Nirvana ( Andrew & McMeel, 1995), Cartoon Marriage ( with Michael Maslin) (Random House, 2009), When Do They Serve the Wine?( Chronicle, 2010). Women On Men (Narrative Library, 2013). Donnelly also wrote and illustrated a popular series of dinosaur books for children ( Dinosaur Day, Dinosaur Beach, Dinosaur Halloween, etc.) all published by Scholastic.  She is the CBS News Resident Cartoonist. Website: http://www.lizadonnelly.com

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

We’re being watched by Drew Panckeri, who began contributing to The New Yorker in April of 2015.

 

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Chatfield Live!

From The Daily Cartoonist, June 15, 2020,  “Wacom Sponsors Webinar Featuring Jason Chatfield and Ed Steckley”

Mr. Chatfield began contributing to The New Yorker in 2017.

Visit his website here.

 

 

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…J.A.K’s about to released book & Grant Snider’s get noticed by The New York Times. Read here.

…Speaking of The New York Times, here’s a piece about MAD‘s just retired Al Jaffee and the issue of MAD celebrating his career.

 

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of June 22, 2020

The CoverHere’s the magazine’s feature exploring this exceptionally powerful cover by Kadir Nelson.

 

The Cartoonists:

The Cartoons:

First, a little paperwork: sorry the screen grab above is fuzzy. I’ll attempt to fix before the day is done.

Thirteen cartoons this week, plus a full page Sketchbook by Barry Blitt. Two of the cartoons caught my eye this week. The first is by Ellis Rosen (it’s on page 78). It’s an idea that beautifully blends a past time situation oft seen in the magazine  — the writer in the coffee shop — with our present time. A rock-solid idea, well executed. And, not least, funny. And that also describes Maggie Larson’s ice cream truck and gelato truck drawing (p.84): it’s an evergreen cartoon — it will be understood and enjoyed for years to come.  Applause, applause!

The Rea Irvin Talk Masthead Watch:

I’d love to report that the above Rea Irvin iconic design has returned as the magazine’s Talk heading, but nooooo. Read about its removal here.

 

Victor Varnado: “How I Became A New Yorker Cartoonist”; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon; Revisiting A Video Of Interest: Jenny Kroik; Al Jaffee’s Last MAD Fold-In

I’m always interested in hearing every New Yorker cartoonist’s story of their first sale to the magazine. It’s a “moment” they’ll never forget. Here’s Victor Varnado talking about his.

Mr. Varnado’s first New Yorker cartoon appeared in the issue of July 8, 2019.  Visit his website here.

And as long as we’re talking about Mr. Varnado…he’s Today’s Daily Cartoonist.

See his cartoon here.

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Revisiting A Video Of Interest: Jenny Kroik

From The 92nd Street Y,  this brief video of New Yorker cover artist, Jenny Kroik.

(The video originally posted in Feb of 2019, reposted by Viewing NYC  June 12, 2020).

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The Spill has always had a soft spot for MAD and its artists; the magazine, as I’ve said before, surely inspired numerous budding New Yorker cartoonists (including this one) over the years, and in more recent times published a number of New Yorker artists.

Although Al Jaffee’s work never appeared in The New Yorker, he did submit covers a ways back (I remember seeing at least one terrific cover submission at a MoCCA gallery show in SoHo ages ago). Mr. Jaffee, who was responsible for MAD’s iconic fold-in, recently announced his retirement (at age 99). Below is his very last one. Read more (and see more) here on The Forward.

 

Thurber Thursday: Fave Cover; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon; Article Of Interest: “School Days Influences…”

Of all the Thurber books published in his lifetime it’s the cover of Let your Mind Alone! that I’ve always liked best. Notice I said the cover, and not the book (I like the book too, but it’s not my favorite).

The cover relies on a single Thurber drawing, “Motorman Concealing His Sex Life from a Woman Psychologist” (it appears, run vertically, in Chapter 9).

I’ve never thought too much about why the cover is so appealing (and I won’t now) — it’s just one of those things. A quick thought is that the cover drawing seems an odd choice considering the other choices within. Perhaps it’s the oddity that’s appealing.

According to Bowden’s James Thurber: A Bibliography , the first edition (published September of ’37) was  5000 copies. By year’s end there were six editions.

A few things about my copy: someone glued the dust jacket flap — just the flap — on the inside front cover of my copy. And: next to the fellow on the right, there’s a barely visible white line impression of the fellow walking off under the glued down flap. 

Funnily enough, even though the dust jacket cover is my fave, I do not have it (other than that glued inside flap mentioned above). My copy, a first edition, bought for $2.50 (‘as is”) decades ago, was coverless.

There are a number of later editions, with other covers, but for me, the first is the best (the Armed Services Edition is pretty great too).

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Maddie Dai on a deep-sixed Christopher Columbus.

Ms. Dai began contributing to The New Yorker in 2017.  Visit her website here.

 

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From The Elective, June 11, 2020, “School Days Influences: Inside The World Of New Yorker Cartoonists”

Eight* New Yorker cartoonists and one** cover artist on their schooling.

*Lila Ash, Liza Donnelly, Amy Hwang, Navied Mahdavian, Sam Marlow, Liz Montague, Jeremy Nguyen, Ellis Rosen, **Robert Sikoryak.

Illustration: Michael Witte‘s cover for The New Yorker Book Of Teacher Cartoons

 

 

 

The Wednesday Watch: Al Frueh’s Stage Folk; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Al Frueh’s Stage Folk

Here’s a true oddity, and an expensive one at that: Al Frueh’s Stage Folk: A Book of Caricatures, published in 1922. A copy  went for a little over a thousand bucks when sold by Hakes Auction in 2010.

I know what some of you might think: The New Yorker didn’t begin publishing until 1925, so why is a book published in 1922 of interest. Some Frueh context:

The very first cartoon in the very first issue of The New Yorker was by Al Frueh.* He was also responsible for the magazine’s second cover.** He never had another, but in his case perhaps once was enough as he was to carve out a space and a place in the magazine for nearly four decades (1925-1962) as its theatrical caricaturist (according to this Illustration Age piece, Frueh “contributed four hundred and seventy theatre caricatures and some four hundred other illustrations and cartoons for the magazine”).

His four hundred and seventy theatre caricatures brings us back to Stage Folk, published three years before Frueh began his long run at The New Yorker.  As explained by Frueh himself in the Hakes copy, he hand printed all but one of the 37 prints in the book, which was limited to 500 copies. Frueh’s work in Stage Folk  (which I assume appeared in the New York World, his home before The New Yorker) is the same wonderful minimalist flowing style The New Yorker readership enjoyed for so many years. Two examples from Stage Folk: below, left, Ethel Barrymore, and right, George M. Cohan.

* and **: Below left, Mr. Frueh’s drawing in the first issue of The New Yorker, February 21, 1925; below right, Frueh’s cover for the magazine’s second issue, February 28, 1925.

More Frueh

For those wanting more about Frueh, there’s Frueh On The Theatre: Theatrical Caricatures 1906-1962, a catalog from The New York Public Library, published in 1972  (preface by Brendan Gill).

 

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Tim Hamilton on secret tactics.

Mr. Hamilton has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2016. Visit his website here.