Maggie Larson Pencilled; Cartoon Companion Rates This Week’s New Yorker Cartoons

Maggie Larson Pencilled

 Maggie Larson (a fellow Rapidograph user!) is the subject of Jane Mattimoe’s latest Fine Case For Pencils post.  Read it here

Ms. Larson began contributing to The New Yorker in July of last year.

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Cartoon Companion Rates This Week’s New Yorker Cartoons

The CC’s “Max” and “Simon” ( the two folks behind the CC  prefer to remain anonymous) run through the latest New Yorker cartoons, applying a numbered rating.  Read it here.

Kodak’s Cartoon Campaign With Addams, Steig, And George Price; Liza Donnelly In Walt Disney’s Hometown

Kodak’s Cartoon Campaign With Addams, Steig, And George Price

Stephen Nadler’s latest Attempted Bloggery post shows us some wonderful work by three New Yorker cartoon gods: Charles Addams, William Steig and George Price. See all the ads here.

The artists entries on the Spill‘s A-Z:

 

 

 

 

Charles Addams (above) Born in Westfield, New Jersey, January  7, 1912. Died September 29, 1988, New York City. New Yorker work: 1932 – 1988 * the New Yorker has published his work posthumously. One of the giants of The New Yorker’s  stable of artists.  Key cartoon collections: While all of Addams’ collections are worthwhile, here are three that are particular favorites; Homebodies (Simon & Schuster, 1954), The Groaning Board (Simon & Schuster, 1964), Creature Comforts (Simon & Schuster, 1981). In 1991 Knopf published The World of Chas Addams, a retrospective collection. Visit the Addams Foundation website for far more information : http://www.charlesaddams.com/

 

William Steig (photo above) Born in Brooklyn, NY, Nov. 14, 1907, died in Boston, Mass., Oct. 3, 2003. In a New Yorker career that lasted well over half a century and a publishing history that contains more than a cart load of books, both children’s and otherwise, it’s impossible to sum up Steig’s influence here on Ink Spill. He was among the giants of the New Yorker cartoon world, along with James Thurber, Saul Steinberg, Charles Addams, Helen Hokinson and Peter Arno. Lee Lorenz’s World of William Steig (Artisan, 1998) is an excellent way to begin exploring Steig’s life and work. NYer work: 1930 -2003.

George Price (above) Born in Coytesville, New Jersey, June 9, 1901. Died January 12, 1995, Engelwood, New Jersey. New Yorker work: 1929 – 1991. Lee Lorenz, the New Yorker’s former Art/Cartoon editor, called Price one of the magazine’s great stylists (along with Peter Arno, Helen Hokinson, James Thurber, and William Steig. Of the many Price collections here are two favorites:  Browse At Your Own Risk (1977), and The World of George Price: A 55-Year Retrospective (1988)

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Liza Donnelly To Speak In Walt Disney’s Hometown

Ms. Donnelly, who’s work has appeared in The New Yorker since 1982, will speak this week at Toonfest in Marceline, Missouri, Walt Disney’s hometown.

 

 

Liana Finck’s Pigeons; Bob Eckstein at the Writer’s Digest Workshop

Liana Finck’s Pigeons

From The New York Times, September 11, 2018, “A Cartoonist’s Flock of Pigeons Fit for Fashion Week” 

And...listen to  “A Graphic Memoir on Finding Your True Self”  — a fifteen minute interview with Ms. Finck on WNYC (broadcast September 11, 2018)

— Ms. Finck has been contributing to the New Yorker since 2013.  Her next book, Passing For Human, is out September 18.

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Bob Eckstein at the Writer’s Digest Conference

From the New Yorker‘s Culture Desk, September 11, 2018, “A Sketchbook Of The Writer’s Digest Annual Conference”

— Mr. Eckstein has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2007. He is the author of the just released Illustrated History of The Snowman.

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of September 17, 2018

The cover

If you haven’t already seen the school busses on the road, or the signs posted everywhere advising that school is back in session, Chris Ware’s cover is yet another reminder that it’s back to school time.

The cartoons

Here, for the record, are the contributing cartoonists in the issue:

A quick survey of each drawing: Ms. Suits gives us a cactus drawing (are cactus the new crash test dummies — this being the second cactus drawing out of the past three issues); Mr. Dernavich provides us with an end of summer roller coaster drawing with some unintentional(?) graphic trickery concerning the track itself; Ms. McNair’s couple have neighborly dinner date issues; Farley Katz takes us to a sturdy cartoon scenario of parent reading to a child at bedtime; William Haefeli up next with his trademark drawing style and an excellent caption; an Edward Koren drawing — allowed a wonderful space on the page. Very nice all around!; Ben Schwartz plays with Rodin’s The Thinker; Ed Steed plays around with a clown and a banana peel (and it’s in color); Zach Kanin visits a game of spin the bottle (a scenario we rarely see); Frank Cotham allows us a peek into a room full of sweaty frock-coated gentlemen; Sara Lautman takes us up up and away to the sky god’s territory; Joe Dator’s drawing of a symphony hall is splendid; Kim Warp’s trash-in-the-sea drawing arrives with trash-in-the sea much in the news.  And finally, a nod to the advent of Fall baseball with a meeting at the pitcher’s mound courtesy of Tom Toro.

The issue arrives sans Rea Irvin’s classic masthead. Here it is:

I can’t let mid-September slip by without mentioning the issue of September 11, 1925 (cover by the aforementioned Mr. Irvin).  

New Yorker history buffs will recall that the magazine was nearly put to rest in the Spring of its first year of publication. If not for an overheard remark, the New Yorker would’ve been a magazine that lasted less than half a year. Instead of killing the magazine, it was decided to coast through the summer,  putting renewed energy into the issue of September 12th. You can read about the specifics on content here courtesy of A New Yorker State of Mind.