The Weekend Spill: From The Spill’s Library: A Look At New Yorker Biographies (Etc.); The Tilley Watch Online, The Week Of May 11-15, 2020; Joe Dator’s Animation

 

From The Spill’s Library: A Look At New Yorker Biographies (Etc.)

If you’ve been spending as much time as I have online, you’ve seen multiple postings by individuals of their personal library (or parts of). Since visiting my fave bookstore is out of the question for now, I’ve found  browsing book collections by others a ton ‘o fun.  I’ve seen a number of (possible) must-have books over the past few weeks — books I didn’t know existed, or books I’d forgotten about. Over the years, I’ve done a few posts on what’s on the Spill’s shelves. Thurber biographies most recently, and not too long ago, a few of Thurber’s books here at Spill headquarters.

Below you’ll see another group that is ordered by subject (the subjects being folks who were or are New Yorker contributors).  This group of books is an arm’s length from where I sit; I like being able to lean back in my office chair and grab a needed title. I’ve included the whole of the Spill‘s E.B  White collection (mostly books by him, and the great White bio by Scott Elledge) because much of his work seems (to me) to fit into autobiography. The A-Z section begins just to the right of Katharine White’s Onward And Upward in the Garden with Renata Adler’s Gone. Not everything New Yorker contributor/autobiographical/biographical is shown here. Books by the subjects (that is, books by New Yorker contributors) are on the other side of my desk — not arm’s length, but close enough. There’s plenty of autobiographical material in many of them (the Updike and Roth books alone take up a couple of shelves). There are also books that haven’t yet found a shelf (I need to build more). But the ones shown here are the core — the go-to books that help me determine what was what and who was who at The New Yorker.

The Ross section includes a title that might cause some head-scratching: Good Food For Bad Stomachs by Sara M. Jordan, M.D. & Sheila Hibben. It’s there because the (4 page)  Introduction was written by Harold Ross.

 

 

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The Tilley Watch Online, May 11-15, 2020

An end of the week listing of New Yorker artists who contributed to newyorker.com features

The Daily Cartoon: Colin Tom, Tom Toro, Lars Kenseth, David Sipress, Elisabeth McNair.

Daily Shouts: Olivia de Recat, Gabrielle Bell.

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Joe Dator’s Animation

The fab Joe Dator has posted a four minute animation. Mr. Dator had this to say about it on Facebook:

My quarantine project for several weeks has been writing and directing this animated short film, called “EARTH”, about an alien invasion gone wrong. I’m thrilled to finally to be able to show it to you guys!  

See it here.

Joe Dator began contributing to The New Yorker in August of 2006.  Visit his website here.

Profile Of Interest: Andre Francois; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon; Today’s Daily Shouts Cartoonist

Profile Of Interest: Andre Francois

From Art & Artist, May 15, 2020, Andre Francois, Pt.1 this look at the work of the great New Yorker cover artist, Andre Francois.

Here’s his entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Andre Francois (pictured above, 1978) Birth/death information from his New York Times obit of April 15, 2005: Born Andre Farkas, 1915, Timisoara. Died, April, 2005, Grisy-les-Platres, France.

Known primarily for his New Yorker covers, of which there were 54, he also contributed two illustrations (his illustration of May 7, 2001, accompanying an article on mussels was his last published piece in the New Yorker). 

Essential Collection: The Tattooed Sailor. (Knopf, 1954)

He also contributed one drawing to The New Yorker (shown below).  It appeared in the issue of December 19, 1964.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Colin Tom on making things worse.

Mr. Tom has been contributing to The New Yorker since

2015. Visit his website here.

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Today’s Daily Shouts Cartoonist

From Olivia de Recat: What’s Behind Window No. 1?

Ms. de Recat  has been contributing toThe New Yorker since 2018. Visit her website here.

 

Thurber Thursday: Of Thurber & Columbustown, And Thurber’s “Passport” To A Speakeasy; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon…And Today’s Daily Shouts Cartoonist

Here’s a favorite Thurber booklet, Of Thurber & Columbustown, described within as  “recollections of Columbus people who had known Thurber.” I purchased it at The Thurber House in Columbus in February of 1987 (on my first of two visits there). According to the Colophon, it was published in the summer of 1984 in an edition of 600. Rosemary O. Joyce, an oral historian, curated and wrote the material, and conducted the interviews. The fab Michael Rosen (who recently produced and edited A Mile And A Half Of Lines: The Art Of James Thurber) designed and produced it. The Foreword is by Thurber’s daughter, Rosemary Thurber.

The booklet’s 36 pages contain photos, a Thurber drawing or two, and, of course those “recollections.” One of my favorite pieces is this 1933 Thurber speakeasy “passport” handed to a fellow named Whit Dillon, who was one of Thurber’s Ohio State University fraternity brothers. Mr. Dillon talks about acquiring the passport:

“And those were the days of Prohibition. In the evenings, the four of us, and occasionally Jim, would go to dinner at the Algonquin and then to one of the speakeasies. In fact, one of the things I remember most about Jim, was that he knew every speakeasy in New York…one night he couldn’t go with us, so he left me this note — his autograph, the dog — to take to a speakeasy he’d told us about, whose name was apparently Tony.” 

Tony, was most likely Tony Soma, proprietor of Tony’s.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

From Tom Toro: it’s sort of a beautiful day.

Mr. Toro began contributing to The New Yorker in 2010. Visit his website here

 

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Today’s Daily Shouts Cartoonist

From Gabrielle Bell: “I Got A Cat”

Visit her website here.

 

 

 

The Wednesday Watch: Sam Gross Is On Facebook!; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon; A New Yorker State Of Mind Looks At The New Yorker Issue Of April 25, 1931; More Spills: Toro’s New Book; Latest Celeb Caption Contest Video

Sam Gross Is On Facebook!

The one, the only, the fabulous Sam Gross now has a Facebook page.

Mr. Gross’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Sam Gross Born 1933, Bronx, NY. New Yorker work: August 23, 1969 –. Other than his work in The New Yorker, Mr. Gross is probably best known for his work in National Lampoon. He’s edited a large number of collections, including Dogs Dogs Dogs, Cats Cats Cats, Food Food Food: A Feast of Great Cartoons (originally published as All You Can Eat: A Feast of Great Cartoons); Golf Golf Golf, Ho! Ho! Ho!, Movies Movies Movies. Key collections: I Am Blind and My Dog is Dead (Avon, 1978), An Elephant is Soft and Mushy (Avon, 1982)

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Lars Kenseth on being there, sort of.

Mr. Kenseth began contributing to The New Yorker in 2016. Visit his website here.

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A New Yorker State Of Mind Looks At The New Yorker Issue Of April 25, 1931

As usual with this Spill fave blog, it’s always a kick looking at what was happening in the New Yorkersphere way way way back when

Gotta love the Helen Hokinson cover.

Here’s Ms. Hokinson’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

 

Helen Hokinson  Born, Illinois, 1893; died, Washington, D.C., 1949. New Yorker work: 1925 -1949, with some work published posthumously. All of Hokinson’s collections are wonderful, but here are two favorites. Her first collection: So You’re Going To Buy A Book! (Minton, Balch & Co, 1931) and what was billed as “the final Hokinson collection”: The Hokinson Festival (Dutton & Co., 1956). According to a New Yorker document  produced during Harold Ross’s editorship (1925-1951) rating their artists, Ms. Hokinson and Peter Arno occupied a special category unto themselves above all others.

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...Tom Toro‘s first kids book is just out.  Read about it here.  Congrats,  Mr. T!

…the latest celeb New Yorker Caption Contest video has been posted. Several fun/funny captions  by Ellie Kemper & Daniel Radcliffe (the cartoons captioned are by David Borchart, Tom Cheney, Joe Dator, Leo Cullum, Maggie Larson, and Danny Shanahan).

 

 

 

Personal History: From Zero To Sixty; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon…And Yesterday’s

Personal History: From Zero To Sixty

In the summer of 1977, with college behind me and the demands of school work finally over, I was able to focus all of my attention on getting into the New Yorker — my New Yorker or Bust phase.  I’d begun sending the magazine work when I was still in high school, and then all through college, with no luck whatsoever, and an ever-increasing pile of rejected work.

For some reason, during that summer, I thought it would be smart to make a few stabs at being organized, and so I began a ledger, recording what I sent in to the magazine every week. In those days there were a bunch of other magazines buying cartoons — a ledger would help me keep track of what went where; it became routine to send my New Yorker rejects out to them (I’d somehow learned that’s what the professionals did). By mid-August I’d yet to to sell a single cartoon anywhere; I hadn’t made a penny from my work (think Beatles: Out of college, money spent, see no future, pay no rent, all the money’s gone, nowhere to go”) — even something called UFOlogy was rejecting my drawings.

Everything changed when the August 22nd batch — seventeen cartoons — was submitted to The New Yorker. That week I went from having sold zero number of drawings anywhere to any publication to having my work accepted at The New Yorker (it was a drawing of a fortune teller speaking to a customer, saying,“Nothing will ever happen to you”). As momentous a moment as that was for me — my foot finally in the door at The New Yorker! — the magazine was buying the idea (the caption) and handing it to veteran contributor Whitney Darrow, Jr. to execute. As noted in the ledger, it appeared in a December issue of the magazine — December 26th, to be exact.

By 1977, Mr. Darrow had been with the magazine 44 years. It had long been a practice at The New Yorker to supply artists in need of fresh ideas with work sent in from the outside (like me), or from other cartoonists at the magazine, or from the art department staff. There were even a few idea men contracted to do nothing but think up ideas for the artists.

I knew nothing about that system when the fortune teller cartoon made it through The New Yorker‘s editorial hurdles and was bought. I received a check for $150.00 — the first time I was paid for what I wanted to do for a living. When I look at the list shown above it’s a little frightening how empty the page is — all those empty squares, all those rejected drawings. Only two other sales on the page: both New Yorker rejects from that same August 22nd batch: one to Dawn Dusk magazine, and the other to the about-to-be-refurbished Esquire magazine (Esquire never ran that drawing or others of mine it later purchased — they changed course on running cartoons before the maiden issue under Clay Felker appeared on newsstands).

As summer turned to winter, my initial luck with The New Yorker seemed to have run out. Weeks and then months of empty ledger boxes. In early 1978, justlikethat, The New Yorker bought another from me (this time the drawing they published was mine). Oddly, I abandoned the weekly ledger just before that second drawing was taken. I think all those empty boxes were beginning to get to me.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

David Sipress on dinosaurs and stress. Mr. Sipress began contributing to The New Yorker in 1998.

And Yesterday’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Elisabreth McNair on when it’s safe to go out again.

Ms. McNair began contributing to The New yorker in July of 2018.