At The Miami Book Fair Tomorrow: Liana Finck & Bob Eckstein; Meet The Artist (1943): Alajalov; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

At The Miami Book Fair Tomorrow: Liana Finck & Bob Eckstein

Catch Liana Finck and Bob Eckstein in a joint appearance tomorrow morning at Miami Dade College.  Here’s the info!

Above: Ms. Finck’s latest book and Mr. Eckstein’s.*

Liana Finck began contributing to The New Yorker in 2013.  Visit her website here.

Bob Eckstein began contributing to The New Yorker in 2007.  Visit his website here.

*Full disclosure: my work, as well as my wife’s (Liza Donnelly) appears in Everyone’s A Critic

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Meet The Artist (1943): Alajalov

Another in a series of self portraits of New Yorker artists included in the Meet The Artist catalog published by the M.H. de Young Memorial Museum in 1943.

Alajalov’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Constantin Alajalov Born Constantin Aladjalov, 1900, Rostov-on-the-Don, Russia. Died Oct., 1987, Amenia, New York. New Yorker work: 1926 -1960. Perhaps best known for his New Yorker covers ( he also supplied cover art to other publications). Key collection: Conversation Pieces (The Studio Publications Inc., 1942) w/ commentary by Janet Flanner. A profile from The Saturday Evening Post.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Look! Up in the sky!…by J.A.K. who  began contributing to The New Yorker in 2014.

Photos Of Interest; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon; More Spills…Chast, Campbell, Karasik

Photos Of Interest

If you link here to the photographer Deborah Feingold’s website you’ll find portraits of a number of New Yorker folks including Edward Sorel, John Cuneo, Barry Blitt, Loveis Wise, and Bob Staake.

 

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Two million Trump bucks, by Jon Adams.  Mr. Adams has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2017. Visit his website here.

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...here’s a recent interview with Paul Karasik (his first New Yorker cartoon appeared in 1999).

….Roz Chast and a former New Yorker editor will appear at NYC’s 92Y.  Info here.  Ms. Chast began contributing to The New Yorker in 1978.

…If you like planning ahead, here’s a link to a Chast appearance in 2020.

…From The New York Times Book Review, posted November 8, 2019, A Graphic Review piece by Hilary Fitzgerald Campbell. Ms. Campbell began contributing to The New Yorker in 2017.

New Yorker Cartoons On The Empire State Building’s Walls; Jimmy Kimmel’s Cartoon Rejected By The New Yorker; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

New Yorker Cartoons On The Empire State Building Walls

The iconic Empire State Building now boasts half-a-dozen New Yorker cartoons on its walls.  One each by Robert Leighton, Liana Finck, John O’Brien, Tom Cheney, Jason Patterson,  and Frank Modell.

Through the courtesy of Mr. Leighton (who is shown below, at The Empire State Building, with his drawing*) the Spill shows you three of the six cartoons in situ, and tell you a little about their installation and how their installation came to be.

Left: Frank Modell’s drawing, published in The New Yorker, 1975

Mr. Leighton has shared the information he received when the project was first proposed to him:

“As part of ongoing upgrades to the Empire State Building Observatory experience, we’re looking into the idea of installing certain New Yorker cartoons in the stairwells between the 80th floor and the 86th floor.

When visitors come to the Observatory of the Empire State Building, they take the elevator to the 80th floor and transfer to another set of elevators to arrive at the 86th floor open-air Observatory deck. Guests have the option to take the stairs between 80 and 86 instead of the elevator to avoid the lines. We’d like to reward the stair-takers with a whimsical display of New Yorker cartoons in the stairwells. The cartoons would all be thematically appropriate – either relating to the Empire State Building/high rise construction, general unique New York moments or stairs. We think this will be a great “hidden New York” feature that will help guests feel like insiders.”

Asked how the drawings were applied to the walls Mr. Leighton was told:

The design firm, Thinc, used a company called Applied Image. Thinc prepared the graphic image including the title block. They printed the image on a durable, graffiti-resistant, wide format wall vinyl. The vinyl extends to the edges of the available space to avoid picked edges. Then they apply it with adhesive.Here are the official specs: Printed and installed by Applied Image.   Production Method: 3M Envision Print Wrap Film with Avery Anti-Graffiti overlaminate. Anti-Graffiti protects image from scratches, chemicals, solvents or graffiti paint.

—  Above: John O’Brien’s drawing on the wall. Published in The New Yorker 2018.

I asked Mr. Leighton what it meant to him having his drawing chosen:

“When we’re thinking up our cartoons, the most we imagine is that they’ll be printed, saving them from a lifetime of obscurity. For those that see print, our hope is that they’ll be re-printed somewhere, maybe becoming part of a book. To be reprinted like this–becoming a permanent part of the iconic skyscraper of all time–is just a pure undiluted thrill.”

*Mr. Leighton’s drawing, published in The New Yorker February 4, 2013, carried the caption “Escher! Get your ass up here!”  The caption, edited by Mr. Leighton, appearing in the Empire State Building: “Escher! Get back up here!”

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Jimmy Kimmel’s Cartoon Rejected By The New Yorker

Here’s a fun segment from last night’s Jimmy Kimmel program. It features The New Yorker‘s cartoon editor, Emma Allen, in magazine’s offices, as well as on stage in Brooklyn with The New Yorker‘s editor, David Remnick.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

NYC Basketball by Johnny DiNapoli, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2019. Visit his website here.

 

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of September 30, 2019

The Cover: Christoph Niemann returns for the Technology Issue.  Read Francoise Mouly’s Q&A with him about his cover.

The Cartoonists & Cartoons:

Electronically flipping through this new issue (appropriately enough for the Technology Issue) I was happy that the cartoons just kept-a-comin’; there are seventeen of them to be exact. All of them are placed well (i.e., they have plenty of breathing room, and sit well on the page).

Here are random thoughts about some of the cartoons in the new issue…

Joe Dator’s laundromat drawing (page 50): When asked why The New Yorker didn’t run color cartoons*, The New Yorker‘s founder and first editor, Harold Ross reportedly said, “What’s so funny about red?”  What he didn’t say was,“What’s so funny about beet red?”  Mr. Dators’ drawing, incorporating beet red, is hilarious.

I hovered over Victoria Roberts’ campers and bear drawing (p.46), enjoying the drawing itself. We’re used to seeing many of Ms. Roberts drawings set indoors — it’s fun to see her drawing of a tent, and a bear (or a man in a bear suit).

Jason Patterson’s ice cream trucks heading south for the winter  (p. 25) is also fun to linger on. Its concept seems out of the Jack Ziegler school of zany.  Such a good drawing.

Also of note, graphically, and otherwise-ly: Ellie Black’s little red riding hood drawing (p.78)…and Maggie Mull’s Beautiful Mind-ish drawing on page 70; nice to see it stretched out on the page.

Shannon Wheeler’s broccoli opera drawing on page 77.  Its execution is reminiscent of some of William Steig’s middle period work (check out Steig’s 1942 collection, The Lonely Ones).

And of note in a different department: the magazine’s assistant cartoon editor, Colin Stokes’ Shouts & Murmurs piece,“Running With Scissors” (p.33).

The Rea Irvin Talk Masthead Watch: Mr. Irvin’s classic masthead drawing (below) has yet to return.  Hope springs eternal here on The Spill. Read about it here.

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*There were two color cartoons in Ross’s era, very early on in the magazine’s life; both appeared in the issue of December 12, 1925. A full page by Ralph Barton, and a double page spread by Rea Irvin. Mr. Barton did not use red in his drawing, Mr. Irvin did.

 

 

The Weekend Spill: Exhibit Of Interest “Asian Babies: Works From Asian New Yorker Cartoonists”; The Tilley Watch Online, Sept. 2-6, 2019; Profile Of Interest: Roz Chast

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Asian Babies: Works From Asian New Yorker Cartoonists

A must-see exhibit curated by Jeremy Nguyen and Amy Hwang.  All the info above!

Alice Cheng began contributing to The New Yorker in 2017; Maddie Dai in 2017; Amy Hwang in 2010; Suerynn Lee in 2019; Evan Lian in 2019; Hartley Lin in 2019; Christine Mi in 2018; Jeremy Nguyen in 2017, and Colin Tom in 2015.

You can see work by all of the above artists here on The New Yorker‘s Cartoon Bank site.

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The Tilley Watch Online, September 2-6, 2019

 

A gathering of the New Yorker cartoonists whose work appeared this week on The Daily Cartoon and/or  Daily Shouts.

Daily Cartoon: John Cuneo (a Bonus Daily), Ali Solomon, Tim Hamilton, J.A.K., and Jon Adams.

Daily Shouts: Avi Steinberg (with Irving Ruan).

…and Barry Blitt’s Kvetchbook

See all of the above and more here.

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Profile of Interest: Roz Chast

From Hamilton College, September 6, 2019, “Drawing On Fidgety Brilliance” — a short profile of Roz Chast.

Ms. Chast began contributing to The New Yorker in 1978. Visit her website here.