The American Bystander’s Michael Gerber Wants To Save MAD Magazine; Bob Eckstein’s NY Daily News MAD Op-Ed; MAD Cartoonists Vs. New Yorker Cartoonists; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon; Gil Roth Interviews Karl Stevens; 5 Questions: Rich Sparks

The American Bystander’s Michael Gerber, Wants To Save MAD Magazine

 Michael Gerber, the man behind the curtain at American Bystander, is proposing to rescue MAD Magazine.  Below: two Tweets from Mr. Gerber sent out yesterday:

 

 The New York Times called  The American Bystander “…an essential read for comedy nerds”.   Anyone who loves comic art and writing will cheer on Mr. Gerber’s effort  to rescue MAD.

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Bob Eckstein’s N.Y. Daily News MAD Op-Ed

New Yorker cartoonist Bob Eckstein weighs in, via a New York Daily News Op-Ed, on MAD Magazine.  Mr. Eckstein began contributing to The New Yorker in  2007. Visit his website here.

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MAD Cartoonists Vs. New Yorker Cartoonists

Bittersweet.  This on Comic-Con International’s 2019 schedule:

In one corner, the New Yorker magazine, top of the cartoon heap, king of the single-panel, and undisputed peak of the artform. In the other corner, MAD magazine, the magazine most humorists cite as their biggest influence. Which magazine is the better patron saint of cartoonists? Who has funnier cartoons? And, most important, who would win in a fight between Eustace Tilley, the fop from the NY’er, and Alfred E. Neuman, the MAD magazine mascot? Distinguished panelists from both magazines duke it out in a free-for-all discussion. May the funniest one win.

All the info here.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

  Chris Weyant’s gives us sunblock on wheels.  Mr Weyant began contributing to The New Yorker  in 1998. Visit his website here.

 

 

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Gil Roth Interviews Karl Stevens 

Gil Roth adds Karl Stevens to his remarkable list of interviewees (including a goodly number of comics and cartoonists).  Mr. Stevens began contributing to The New Yorker this year.

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5 Questions: Rich Sparks

From Esthetic Lens, July 4, 2019, “5 Questions: Cartoonist Rich Sparks”— like it sez.

Mr. Sparks began contributing to The New Yorker in 2016.  His book, Love and Other Weird Things is out the last day of the year. Visit his website here.

 

Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon; McPhail’s Graphic Novel; Liza Donnelly Illustrates A Carole King Announcement

Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Teresa Burns Parkhurst (a New Yorker cartoonist since 2017) on Pets and 4th Of July Booms. 

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Will McPhail’s Graphic Novel

From The Bookseller, July 3, 2019, “Sceptre Wins Three-Publisher Auction For New Yorker Cartoonist’s Debut” — Will McPhail (shown above)  has been signed to deliver a graphic novel in 2021. Read about it here.

Mr. McPhail began contributing to The New Yorker in 2014.

 

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Liza Donnelly Illustrates A Carole King Announcement

On Twitter @carole_king, this Liza Donnelly drawing via Carole King clarifying that her concert in D.C. on the 4th is not associated with the Trump tank show the same day. A Deadline Hollywood piece here about it.

Ms. Donnelly began contributing to The New Yorker in 1982.

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker (Double) Issue, July 8 & 15, 2019; Today’s Daily Cartoonist’s Cartoon

The Cover: A hot dog cart guy gets some beach time on Peter De Seve’s cover.  Read the Cover Story here.

The Cartoonists:

The Newbies: Making their New Yorker print debut this week: Victor Varnado and Akeem Roberts. They become the record-setting nineteenth and twentieth new cartoonists entering the magazine’s stable of artists this year and the forty-fifth and forty-sixth new artists brought in under cartoon editor Emma Allen’s stewardship, begun in May of 2017.

The Cartoons: Brief thoughts on some of the thirteen cartoons in the issue:

Roz Chast’s Ordinary Kreskin drawing (p. 37).  Love Ms. Chast’s right-to-the-point drawings, like this one. Perhaps not so unusual, but noticeable: she’s drawn Mr. Kreskin with five fingers (a lot of cartoonists find four will do for their cartoon characters). 

Liana Finck’s talking baby (p. 44).  A terrific twist on an end-of-life sentiment. I found myself wondering if it would’ve been equally successful had the baby been talking to another baby.

Ed Steed’s hammered drawing (p.54).  At first glance on my laptop, before zooming in on the drawing I thought that Mr. Steed had done a mash-up drawing with George Booth. If you squint your eyes, it’s a very Boothian room (the perspective, the hanging ceiling lamp, the floorboards, wall objects). 100% Steedian is the idea itself and the Steedian happily hammering woman.

My confused initial take on seeing the drawing leads me to toss out a suggestion. There’s been plenty written on this site about cartoon collaboration, but those duets have involved a writer teamed with an artist (or two artists collaborating) with just one person doing the drawing.  Howz about for fun we see some artists team-up and create a drawing or two with multiple styles in one frame. Some suggestions: Chast/Finck, Dator/Donnelly,  Hwang/Shanahan, Sipress/Allenby,  Kenseth/Koren…just a thought. (Liza Donnelly and I had a ton ‘o’ fun doing a series of mash-up full-page graphic pieces for our 2009 collection, Cartoon Marriage)  

Paul Noth’s line of succession drawing (p. 58). Mr. Noth delivers a great drawing.  I only wish it had been given more breathing room (such as Mr. Steed’s). 

Robert Leighton’s drawing (p.32) features a caption that would probably be right at home in a positive thinking seminar.  Yet another Leighton drawing destined for many a refrigerator.   

Karen Sneider’s funny fish in bed recalls the classic George Price drawing published in the magazine’s issue of December 21, 1963

Rea Irvin: Mr. Irvin (with Harold Ross and his then-wife, Jane Grant) was a founder of The New Yorker‘s graphic architecture. Consider his adapted typeface (the so-called Irvin typeface) that is part of the magazine’s DNA, the breadth of cartoon worlds he encouraged as art supervisor, his department heading designs, and his numerous covers (including, of course, the magazine’s brilliant first that gave us Eustace Tilley). Tis a puzzlement that his iconic heading for the Talk Of The Town remains under a tarp. Here it is below, and here’s where you can read about its removal in 2017.

 

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist’s Cartoon

Singin’ under the drip from Amy Kurzweil, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2016. Visit her website here.

The Tilley Watch Online, April 21-26, 2019; Two Books From Will McPhail; About Zach Kanin

An end of week round-up of the New Yorker cartoonists who contributed to the online features, the Daily Cartoon and Daily Shouts

The Daily Cartoon: Seth Fleishman, Christopher Weyant, Elisabeth McNair, J.A.K., Avi Steinberg, and Tom Toro.

Daily Shouts: Julia Wertz, Edward Steed, and Ellis Rosen (with Irving Ruan)

To see all of the above, and more, link here.

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Two Books From McPhail

From Publishers Weekly, “Book Deals: Week of April 29, 2019” — news of a two-book deal for Will McPhail. The first, a graphic novel, “In, The Story of Nick” will be out in 2020. The second, Collected Cartoons, will be just that.

Mr. McPhail began contributing to The New Yorker in 2014. Visit his website here.

Further reading: From The Daily Cartoonist: “Tales From the Reuben —  Cranky Digression” 

 — D.D. Degg fact-checks the PW‘.

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About Zach Kanin

From Monsters & Critics, April 27, 2019, Zach Kanin: Who is writer and creator behind I Think You Should Leave with Tim Robinson on Netflix”

Mr. Kanin began contributing to The New Yorker in 2005. Further reading here.