Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon; Today’s Daily Shouts Cartoonist; Meet The Artist (1943): Reginald Marsh

Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Sara Lautman’s Boomer. Ms. Lautman has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2016.  Visit her website here.

 

 

 

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Today’s Daily Shouts

“Small Wins At The Grocery Store” by Jeremy Nguyen.  Mr. Nguyen has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2017. Visit his website here.

 

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Meet The Artist (1943): Reginald Marsh

Another in a series of self portraits of New Yorker artists included in the Meet The Artist catalog published by the M.H. de Young Memorial Museum in 1943.

Mr. Marsh’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Reginald Marsh  Born in Paris, March 14, 1898, died in 1954: New Yorker work: 1925 -1944. More information: http://www.dcmooregallery.com/artists/reginald-marsh

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of November 25, 2019; Today’s Daily Cartoon & Daily Shouts Cartoonists

The Cover: It’s the Food Issue and it’s the Thanksgiving issue, so surprise: a turkey. You can read a Q&A with the cover artist here.

The Cartoonists:

The Cartoons… random comments on a few of the cartoons in this issue:

…Mick Stevens delivers a fab caveman drawing (it’s on page 69).  Beautiful drawing with a great caption.

…another fine drawing/caption from Bruce Eric Kaplan (p.50).

…a full page color “Sketchbook” by Kendra Allenby, as well as drawings by Amy Kurzweil and Lonnie Millsap reflect the issue’s food theme (and, for good measure, a drink drawing by Ellie Black).

…a Thanksgiving drawing by one of The New Yorker‘s Cartoon Gods, Gahan Wilson.

… a fun evergreen caption by Frank Cotham.

…I wonder how many of you will turn T.S. McCoy’s drawing (p.72) upside down.

The Rea Irvin Missing Talk Masthead Watch:

Sadly still missing from The New Yorker (but you can see it directly below). Read about it here.

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Meet The Artist (1943): Richard Taylor

Another in a series of self portraits of New Yorker artists included in the Meet The Artist catalog published by the M.H. de Young Memorial Museum in 1943.

Richard Taylor’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Richard Taylor Born in Fort William, Ontario, Sept. 18, 1902. Died in 1970. New Yorker work: 1935 -1967. Collections: The Better Taylors ( Random House, 1944, and a reprint edition by World Publishing, 1945), Richard Taylor’s Wrong Bag (Simon & Schuster, 1961). Taylor also authored Introduction to Cartooning (Watson -Guptill, 1947). From Taylor’s introduction: the “book is not intended to be a ‘course in cartooning’…instead, it attempts to outline a plan of study — something to be kept at the elbow to steer by.”

Below, the great photo of Richard Taylor from his book Introduction To Cartooning.

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Today’s Daily Cartoon & Daily Shouts Cartoonists

Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon: Robert Leighton on government officials. Mr. Leighton began contributing to The New Yorker in 2002. Visit his website here.

Today’s Daily Shouts: “Dating Material: Stalking Your Ex Throughout History”  by Julia Edelman & Olivia de Recat.  Ms. de Recat has been contributing to The New Yorker (print magazine) since 2018. Visit her website here. Ms. Edelman is a writer who has contributed Daily Shouts pieces illustrated by New Yorker artists.

 

“The Table In Mr. Ross’s Office Where We Used To Sit To Work On Pictures”; Book Of Interest: Alay-Oop By William Gropper; A Case For Pencils On Maddie Dai’s Tools Of The Trade; Daily Shouts & Daily Cartoon Cartoonists; Meet The Artist (1943): Dorothy McKay

“The Table Where We Used To Sit To Work On Pictures”

A photo I’ve seen before on the web, but never with the note attached you see above. The letter, signed “Jim”  was written by the then art editor James Geraghty.* The “Gardner” it’s addressed to was likely Gardner Rea, one of the magazine’s artists. There’s another possibility: the “Gardner” could’ve been Gardner Botsford, a New Yorker editor, but it makes more sense that the art editor was sending one of his artist’s a photo of the art table.  You’ll notice up on the wall is a poster listing some of the magazine’s artists, from Charles Addams to Gluyas Williams.  Also on the wall are five Thurber drawings on the Art Meeting, titled The Art Conference. You can see the series on pages 157-160 in Collecting Himself: James Thurber On Writers And Writing, Humor And Himself.  Edited by Michael Rosen. Published by Harper & Row, 1989.

For further reading on The New Yorker‘s weekly meeting where the table played a part, here’s a Spill post, “The Art Meeting from 2012.

*it has been suggested to me that the “Jim” is actually James Thurber as the provenance of the photo mentions Mr. Thurber but not Mr. Geraghty (the photo is part of the NY Metropolitan Museum of Art’s holdings). I have my doubts it’s “Jim” Thurber, but put the suggestion out there for anyone to confirm, if possible.

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Books Of Interest: Alay-Oop By William Gropper

Out this past June from New York Review Books, Alay-Oop by William Gropper. Mr. Gropper contributed to The New Yorker just once, meaning he’s a Spill One Clubber. More about Alay-Oop here.

Here’s Mr. Gropper’s A-Z entry:

William Gropper (Self portrait, from The Business of Cartooning, 1939) Born, December 3, 1897, NYC. Died, January 6, 1977, Manhasset, NY. 1 drawing, April 11, 1942. Quote:”I owe a great deal to the east side of New York. I was hit on the head with a rock in a gangfight…that’s how I became an artist.” [Quote from catalogue, Meet the Artist, 1943]. For a brief bio of Gropper “the workingman’s protector” visit: http://specialcollections.wichita.edu/

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A Case For Pencils On Maddie Dai’s Tools Of The Trade

Jane Mattimoe’s latest A Case For Pencils post features Maddie Dai, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2017.

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Daily Shouts & Daily Cartoon Cartoonists

Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon: Politics as an energy boost from Kim Warp who began contributing to The New Yorker in 1999. Visit Ms. Warp’s website here.

Yesterday’s Daily Shouts cartoonist: Liana Finck (part of her “Dear Pepper” series). Ms. Finck began contributing to The New Yorker in 2013.  Visit her website here.

Yesterday’s Daily cartoonist: Emily Flake, who began contributing to The New Yorker 2008.  Visit her website here.

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Meet The Artist (1943): Dorothy McKay

The third in a series of New Yorker artists included in Meet The Artist, a catalog published in 1943 by the M.H. de Young Memorial Museum.

Here’s Ms. McKay’s entry on the Spill’s A-Z:


Dorothy McKay  (Photo from Cartoon Humor, 1938) Born c.1904, died June, 1974 New York City. New Yorker work: 1934 -1936.

 

 

From 1943’s Meet The Artist: Steinberg; Article Of Interest: Sempe’s Love For Paris; Release Party For Peter Kuper & Company’s World War 3 Issue #50; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

From 1943’s Meet The Artist: Steinberg

Some years back, hunting through the humor section of a (now closed) used book store in Ellsworth, Maine, I came upon a wonderful catalog, Meet The Artist: An exhibit of self-portraits by living American artists,  published in 1943 for an exhibit at San Francisco’s M.H. de Young Memorial Museum. Among the exhibit’s 150 portraits are 18 by New Yorker contributors. For the next few weeks the Spill will post these 18 self-portraits.

We begin with Saul Steinberg:

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Article Of Interest: Sempe

Here’s an article from a few years back that escaped my attention:  From Bonjour Paris, June 13, 2016, “Sempe, the Celebrated Cartoonist and His Love for Paris”

Mr. Sempe began contributing to The New Yorker in 1978.

— pictured: paperback edition of Sempe’s first collection, Rien N’est Simple (Nothing Is Simple), published 1962.

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Event Of Interest:

This notice of a release party for World War 3  Issue #50:

A release party featuring LIVE presentations by the artists is happening Sunday December 8th at Printed Matter’s New York Chelsea neighborhood shop at 231 11th Ave, (at 26th Street) New York, New York 10001. The event starts at 4pm and runs through 6pm. Many artists will be on hand to sign work and answer questions!

From the publishers:

World War 3 Illustrated is an American comics anthology magazine. Established in 1979 by Peter Kuper, Seth Tobocman, and Christof Kohlhofer. Now in its 40th year, it continues its proud tradition of publishing more new comic book artists each issue than any publication of its type.

Visit the WW3 website here.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Ellis Rosen on… the winter coat. Mr. Ellis began contributing to The New Yorker in 2016. Visit his website here.

An Upside Down New Yorker Cover And More From A New Yorker State Of Mind; Today’s Daily Cartoon & Cartoonist

Here’s a fun post from A New Yorker State Of Mind: Reading Every Issue of The New Yorker Magazine. The unusual cover art* is by the great Rea Irvin.

Mr. Irvin’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Rea Irvin  (Self portrait above right from Meet the Artist) Born, San Francisco, 1881; died in the Virgin Islands,1972. Irvin was the cover artist for the New Yorker’s first issue, February 21, 1925. He was the magazine’s first art editor, holding the position from 1925 until 1939 when James Geraghty assumed the title. Irvin became art director and remained in that position until William Shawn succeeded Harold Ross. Irvin’s last original work for the magazine was the magazine’s cover of July 12, 1958. The February 21, 1925 Eustace Tilley cover had been reproduced every year on the magazine’s anniversary until 1994, when R. Crumb’s Tilley-inspired cover appeared. Tilley has since reappeared, with other artists substituting from time-to-time.

*Mr. Irvin’s upside down cover was a first for the magazine. The next upside down cover appeared April 12, 1947. It was also by Mr. Irvin. There wasn’t another upside down cover until the anniversary cover of February 11, 2008 (Mr. Irvin co-credited with Seth, who incorporated Democratic candidates Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton with Irvin’s Eustace Tilley trappings).

 

 

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Today’s Daily Cartoon & Cartoonist

The office cold by Elisabeth McNair, who has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2018. Visit her website here.