Early Release! Next Week’s New Yorker Cover; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon; More Spills…

The third early release New Yorker cover in a month — surely a sign of the times. With the news on overdrive these days I again urge the magazine to consider running an online Daily Cover much as they run a Daily Cartoon and Daily Shouts.

In next week’s cover, Eric Drooker recalls the iconic (c.1930) photo of Grand Central by Hal Morey shown above. Read Francoise Mouly’s brief Q&A with Mr. Drooker here.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Robert Leighton on dating and politics. Mr. Leighton has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2002. Visit his website here.

 

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…From The Believer, March 19, 2020, “News Travels Fast: A Comic” by Ali Solomon. Ms. Solomon began contributing to The New Yorker in November of 2018.

…Get away for awhile with this latest post from A New Yorker State Of Mind, March 18, 2020, “The End Of The World” — a look at The New Yorker issue of March 7, 1931. Good stuff, as always!

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Weighing whether to go out for some essentials today, I was reminded of a New Yorker drawing of mine from the issue of March 14, 2011…

Thurber Thursday (Personal History); Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon; More Spills: Solomon, JAK

Thurber Thursday

When I moved to Greenwich Village in late 1977, renting an apartment on West 11th Street, I’d no idea how near I was living to the once home of James Thurber — the fellow whose work brought me to the big city. In the photo above (thanks Google!) the grey and yellow-paneled modern building all the way to the right at 65 West 11th Street, was the location of Thurber’s home in the late 1920s (1928, according to  Harrison Kinney’s excellent Thurber biography, James Thurber: His Life and Times, Henry Holt, 1995). Thurber and his wife moved to West 11th from their Horatio Street apartment [anyone have an address for Thurber’s Horatio apartment? Neither Kinney nor Bernstein’s biographies have it]. The building that housed Thurber’s apartment was replaced by the New School’s Eugene Lang College of Liberal Arts in the late 1950s.

Just past the yellow school crossing sign, at the corner of 6th and West 11th, there was a magazine store. It was at that corner, back in April of 1977, that I opened the latest issue of The New Yorker to see my name listed for the first time. Quite a moment. My apartment was on the other side of 6th, a few doors past what once was (the fabulous) Ray’s Pizza (Ray’s was on the NW corner of 6th and West 11th, street level in the red brick building you see beyond the yellow school crossing sign).

Years later I came to learn how many New Yorker folks lived on West 11th.  Here’s a close-up of the street from the Ink Spill map of The New Yorker’s New York, posted in 2013. I had some sliver of interaction with all of these folks, except, of course, Thurber, and Ross, who died before I was born. Peter DeVries “fixed” one of my earliest captions (he was, at the time I began at the magazine, a caption doctor); I lived in the same building as Donald Barthelme, in the apartment just above his; courtesy of Mr. Barthelme, I met, sat next to, and listened to Steinberg in the garden of the apartment building (as you see on the map snippet, he once actually lived in an apartment on the corner of 6th and West 11th); also courtesy of Mr. Barthelme, I spent some time chatting with Grace Paley at a Barthelme party; walked past S.J. Perelman on Carmine Street, but was too afraid (or intimidated, or whatever) to introduce myself. Just walking past him was experience enough.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Adam Douglas Thompson on Waldo & distancing. Mr. Thompson began contributing to The New Yorker in April of 2019

 

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…From Submittable, March 18, 2020, “5 Literary Cartoons By Ali Solomon” Ms. Solomon began contributing to The New Yorker in November of 2018.

…From Believer Magazine, March 18, 2020, “The Coffee Isn’t Even Bitter: A Comic” by Jason Adam Katzenstein. Mr. K. has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2014.

The Wednesday Watch: Playboy Will End Its Print Edition; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon…And Today’s Daily Shouts Cartoonist

Playboy Will End Its Print Edition

From WWD, March 18, 2020, “Playboy Magazine Ceases Print Edition After 66 Years”

The magazine’s Spring 2020 issue will be its last print edition. An online edition will continue (the magazine says “special” issues may appear next year).  For many years, in the latter part of the Golden Age of Cartoons, as magazines that carried cartoons failed, Playboy emerged as the next best market (after The New Yorker), pay-wise, for single panel cartoonists. Like The New Yorker, the magazine had an anchor stable of artists, some of them on contract. In recent years the magazine dropped cartoons, and then brought some back.

Here’s further reading on  Hugh Hefner, aspiring cartoonist turned Playboy founder.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Getting to know you, by Teresa Burns Parkhurst, who began contributing to The New Yorker in October of 2017.

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Today’s Daily Shouts Cartoonist

“How I Wish To Receive Notifictions” by Emily Flake, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2008.

The Weekend Spill: Emily Hopkins Essay; The Tilley Watch Online, The Week Of March 9-13, 2020

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Essays Of Interest…Includes Emily Hopkins

Pretty Bitches: On Being Called Crazy, Angry, Bossy, Frumpy, Feisty, And All the Other Words That Are Used To Undermine Women has just been released by Seal Press. Edited by Lizzie Skurnick, it includes an essay by New Yorker cartoonist Emily Hopkins (Emily Richards at the time of her New Yorker debut) is included.

More: See Ms. Hopkins’ Secret Showcase of My Family Portraits here.

Ms. Hopkins entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Emily Richards (now Emily Hopkins) New Yorker work: 2004 – . Born, Boston, Massachusetts, 1970.  Grew up in Oregon, Hawaii, West Virginia, and Virginia.  Attended Williams College and West Virginia University. Received a masters degree at Johns Hopkins University. Worked, initially, as a New Yorker fact checker before becoming a New Yorker cartoonist. When Ms. Richards married New Yorker cartoonist Marshall Hopkins they became the third married New Yorker cartoonist couple in the magazine’s history (Mary Petty & Alan Dunn were the first, Liza Donnelly & Michael Maslin were the second). Ms. Richards (Hopkins) is the first known black female New Yorker cartoonist.

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A listing of New Yorker cartoonists who contributed to newyorker.com this past week

The Daily Cartoon: Peter Kuper, Andy Dubbin, Jon Adams, Pat Achilles, Teresa Burns Parkhurst.

Daily Shouts:  Avi Steinberg( with Irving Raun & Mia Mercado), Jeremy Nguyen (with Taylor Garron).

…and Barry Blitt’s Kvetchbook.

See the week’s cartoons and humor pieces here.

 

 

 

 

 

Interview Of Interest: Emma Hunsinger; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon; Conde Nast Employees Work Remotely

Interview Of Interest: Emma Hunsinger

From Solrad, (undated, but posted 2020)  “Treating Myself to Gatorade and Gum: An Interview with Emma Hunsinger”

Ms. Hunsinger began contributing to The New Yorker in

November of 2017. Visit her website here.

 

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Peter Kuper on keeping one’s distance. Mr. Kuper began contributing to The New Yorker in 2011.  Visit his website here.

 

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Conde Nast Employees Work Remotely

From The New York Post, March 11, 2020, “NYC Publishers Tell Employees To Work From Home”