Profile Of Interest: Andre Francois; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon; Today’s Daily Shouts Cartoonist

Profile Of Interest: Andre Francois

From Art & Artist, May 15, 2020, Andre Francois, Pt.1 this look at the work of the great New Yorker cover artist, Andre Francois.

Here’s his entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Andre Francois (pictured above, 1978) Birth/death information from his New York Times obit of April 15, 2005: Born Andre Farkas, 1915, Timisoara. Died, April, 2005, Grisy-les-Platres, France.

Known primarily for his New Yorker covers, of which there were 54, he also contributed two illustrations (his illustration of May 7, 2001, accompanying an article on mussels was his last published piece in the New Yorker). 

Essential Collection: The Tattooed Sailor. (Knopf, 1954)

He also contributed one drawing to The New Yorker (shown below).  It appeared in the issue of December 19, 1964.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Colin Tom on making things worse.

Mr. Tom has been contributing to The New Yorker since

2015. Visit his website here.

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Today’s Daily Shouts Cartoonist

From Olivia de Recat: What’s Behind Window No. 1?

Ms. de Recat  has been contributing toThe New Yorker since 2018. Visit her website here.

 

Thurber Thursday: Of Thurber & Columbustown, And Thurber’s “Passport” To A Speakeasy; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon…And Today’s Daily Shouts Cartoonist

Here’s a favorite Thurber booklet, Of Thurber & Columbustown, described within as  “recollections of Columbus people who had known Thurber.” I purchased it at The Thurber House in Columbus in February of 1987 (on my first of two visits there). According to the Colophon, it was published in the summer of 1984 in an edition of 600. Rosemary O. Joyce, an oral historian, curated and wrote the material, and conducted the interviews. The fab Michael Rosen (who recently produced and edited A Mile And A Half Of Lines: The Art Of James Thurber) designed and produced it. The Foreword is by Thurber’s daughter, Rosemary Thurber.

The booklet’s 36 pages contain photos, a Thurber drawing or two, and, of course those “recollections.” One of my favorite pieces is this 1933 Thurber speakeasy “passport” handed to a fellow named Whit Dillon, who was one of Thurber’s Ohio State University fraternity brothers. Mr. Dillon talks about acquiring the passport:

“And those were the days of Prohibition. In the evenings, the four of us, and occasionally Jim, would go to dinner at the Algonquin and then to one of the speakeasies. In fact, one of the things I remember most about Jim, was that he knew every speakeasy in New York…one night he couldn’t go with us, so he left me this note — his autograph, the dog — to take to a speakeasy he’d told us about, whose name was apparently Tony.” 

Tony, was most likely Tony Soma, proprietor of Tony’s.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

From Tom Toro: it’s sort of a beautiful day.

Mr. Toro began contributing to The New Yorker in 2010. Visit his website here

 

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Today’s Daily Shouts Cartoonist

From Gabrielle Bell: “I Got A Cat”

Visit her website here.

 

 

 

The Wednesday Watch: Sam Gross Is On Facebook!; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon; A New Yorker State Of Mind Looks At The New Yorker Issue Of April 25, 1931; More Spills: Toro’s New Book; Latest Celeb Caption Contest Video

Sam Gross Is On Facebook!

The one, the only, the fabulous Sam Gross now has a Facebook page.

Mr. Gross’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Sam Gross Born 1933, Bronx, NY. New Yorker work: August 23, 1969 –. Other than his work in The New Yorker, Mr. Gross is probably best known for his work in National Lampoon. He’s edited a large number of collections, including Dogs Dogs Dogs, Cats Cats Cats, Food Food Food: A Feast of Great Cartoons (originally published as All You Can Eat: A Feast of Great Cartoons); Golf Golf Golf, Ho! Ho! Ho!, Movies Movies Movies. Key collections: I Am Blind and My Dog is Dead (Avon, 1978), An Elephant is Soft and Mushy (Avon, 1982)

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Lars Kenseth on being there, sort of.

Mr. Kenseth began contributing to The New Yorker in 2016. Visit his website here.

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A New Yorker State Of Mind Looks At The New Yorker Issue Of April 25, 1931

As usual with this Spill fave blog, it’s always a kick looking at what was happening in the New Yorkersphere way way way back when

Gotta love the Helen Hokinson cover.

Here’s Ms. Hokinson’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

 

Helen Hokinson  Born, Illinois, 1893; died, Washington, D.C., 1949. New Yorker work: 1925 -1949, with some work published posthumously. All of Hokinson’s collections are wonderful, but here are two favorites. Her first collection: So You’re Going To Buy A Book! (Minton, Balch & Co, 1931) and what was billed as “the final Hokinson collection”: The Hokinson Festival (Dutton & Co., 1956). According to a New Yorker document  produced during Harold Ross’s editorship (1925-1951) rating their artists, Ms. Hokinson and Peter Arno occupied a special category unto themselves above all others.

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...Tom Toro‘s first kids book is just out.  Read about it here.  Congrats,  Mr. T!

…the latest celeb New Yorker Caption Contest video has been posted. Several fun/funny captions  by Ellie Kemper & Daniel Radcliffe (the cartoons captioned are by David Borchart, Tom Cheney, Joe Dator, Leo Cullum, Maggie Larson, and Danny Shanahan).

 

 

 

Article & Audio & Video Of Interest: Barbara Shermund; A New Yorker State Of Mind Looks At The Issue Of April 18, 1931; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Yesterday’s

Article & Audio & Video Of Interest: Barbara Shermund

From WOUB, Public Radio, May 8, 2020, “When Your Lost Relative Turns Out To Be A Monumental Artist” —  this piece, with accompanying audio and video features  about Amanda Gormley delving into the life and work of her aunt, the late very great Barbara Shermund.

Above left: A Shermund self-portrait. Right: Ms. Shermund’s first New Yorker appearance was as a cover artist for the issue of June 13, 1925. Her second appearance, October 3, 1925, was also as a cover artist. She then went on to contribute 599 cartoons, and six more covers.

Barbara Shermund’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Barbara Shermund  Born, San Francisco. 1899. Studied at The California School of Fine Arts. Died, 1978, New Jersey. New Yorker work: June 13, 1925 thru September 16, 1944. 8 covers and 599 cartoons. Shermund’s post-New Yorker work was featured in Esquire. (See Liza Donnelly’s book, Funny Ladies — a history of The New Yorker’s women cartoonists — for more on Shermund’s life and work).

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A New Yorker State Of Mind Looks At The Issue Of April 13, 1931

From a Spill fave blog, A New Yorker State of Mind: Reading Every Issue Of The New Yorker, a look at the issue of April 18, 1931. This post features a generous segment on the magazine’s famed columnist, Lois Long (and a good deal of Peter Arno art).

Cover: Charles Donelan (if there was a Spill One Club of cover artists, Mr. Donelan would be a member).

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon:

Hilary Allison gives us a desk salad cartoon.

Ms. Allison began contributing to newyorker.com last month.

 

and Yesterday’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon: Avi Steinberg with a desert island haircut.

Mr. Steinberg began contributing to The New Yorker in 2012

 

The Wednesday Watch: Podcast Of Interest With Liza Donnelly; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

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Not too long ago before NYC largely shut down, Liza Donnelly dropped by The Comic Strip Live where she was a guest on Jane Condon’s podcast, Funny Over 50.

Listen here.

Ms. Donnelly began contributing to The New Yorker in 1982.  Visit her website here.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Home officing it, by Teresa Burns Parkhurst who began contributing to The New Yorker in October of 2017.