One Of The Ones To Watch At DOC NYC Fest: “Stevenson Lost And Found”; Reminder! Peter Kuper Tonight At Greenlight; A Liana Finck Exhibit; Andy Friedman (aka Larry Hat) On Panel With Billy Joel; Today’s Daily Cartoonist: Ward Sutton; Review Of Interest: “Screwball! The Cartoonists Who Made The Funnies Funny”

James Stevenson Film One Of Ones To Watch At Doc NYC Fest

From Bedford + Bowery, November 6, 2019, “What To Watch At This Year’s Doc NYC Festival”

James Stevenson’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

James Stevenson Born, NYC, 1929. Died, February 17, 2017, Cos Cob, Connecticut. New Yorker work: March 10, 1956 -. Stevenson interned as an office boy at The New Yorker in the mid 1940s when he began supplying ideas for other New Yorker artists. Nine years later he was hired a full-time ideaman, given an office at the magazine and instructed not to tell anyone what he did. He eventually began publishing his own cartoons and covers as well as a ground-breaking Talk of the Town pieces (ground breaking in that the pieces were illustrated). His contributions to the magazine number over 2000. Key collections: Sorry Lady — This Beach is Private! (MacMillan, 1963), Let’s Boogie ( Dodd, Mead, 1978). Stevenson has long been a children’s book author, with roughly one hundred titles to his credit. He was a frequent contributor to the Op-Ed page of The New York Times, under the heading Lost and Found New York. Stevenson’s 2013 book, The Life, Loves and Laughs of Frank Modell, is essential.

________________________________________________________________________________

Mr. Kuper’s just published Heart Of Darkness is receiving rave reviews (like this one for instance).  Help him celebrate the book’s publication this evening. Info here on tonight’s appearance.

Mr. Kuper began contributing to The New Yorker in 2011.  Visit his website here.

___________________________________________________________________

A Liana Finck Exhibit

The above posted this afternoon on Facebook. Ms. Finck began contributing to The New Yorker in 2013.  Visit her website here.

_________________________________________________________________________

Andy Friedman (aka Larry Hat) On Panel With Billy Joel

From Newsday, November 7, 2019, “Billy Joel to be panelist on LI arts- education forum”

Andy Friedman is part of a panel including Mr. Joel. Mr. Friedman, who at times has been published as “Larry Hat,”  began contributing to The New Yorker in 2001. Visit his website here.

 

____________________________________________________________________________

Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Political Bingo! by the one and only Ward Sutton. Mr. Sutton began contributing to The New Yorker in 2007.  Visit his website here.

_____________________________________________________________________

Review Of Interest: “Screwball! The Cartoonists Who Made The Funnies Funny”

Posted today: Eddie Campbell’s Comics Journal review of Paul Tumey’s fun book.  Read here.

Boo!

Happy Halloween!

Here’s a rejected cover submitted to The New Yorker ages and ages ago (sometime in the 1980s) and brought out here on previous Halloweens (what can I say? I like cupcakes). While this one wasn’t green-lighted, another of my Halloween covers was accepted (by then New Yorker editor, Robert Gottlieb, with Lee Lorenz as art editor). Unfortunately that one was a casualty of Tina Brown’s hiring (she “killed” it, along with droves of other bought material by an assortment of the magazine’s artists).

Anyway, it’s always fun to connect Halloween with baked goods. Heck, it’s fun to connect baked goods with any day of the year.

______________________________________________

Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

A Karen Sneider witches brew. Ms. Sneider began contributing to The New Yorker in 2009.

 

___________________________________________

Addams On Halloween

Can’t not mention Charles Addams on this spooky day. It’s a lot of fun having so much Addams in the news lately due to the just released Addams Family animated film. But even without the film, The Addams Family remains a fixture in our culture.  As a student of New Yorker cartoons I never tire of sitting down and looking through any one of his anthologies. The care he put into his work is inspirational.  Each cartoon seems a gem, perfectly (and I’d guess lovingly) constructed. Addams was never my cartoon guru (Thurber is), but I learned more than I’ll ever know from his work.

 

For more on Addams, read Linda Davis’s biography, and go to the Tee & Charles Addams Foundation website.

Above: Chas Addams Monster Rally was published in 1950 by Simon & Schuster

Obscure Gluyas Williams From Bloom’s Vault; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon; A Cartoon Excerpt From “Everyone’s A Critic” On Lit Hub

Obscure Gluyas Williams From Bloom’s Vault

Tom Bloom, who has graciously provided these images from his collection, tells the Spill that the below were “produced as samples for a paper mill c. 1950 or so…the artwork still looks quite crisp (as usual). Each one opens up like a booklet and then again as a broadside presenting examples of printing, paper, technological selections promoting their “Workbook.”

Here’s Gluyas (pronounced Glue-yaz) Williams entry on the Spill‘s  A-Z:

Gluyas Williams  Born, San Francisco, 1888. Died, Boston, Mass., 1982. One of the pillars of Harold Ross’s stable of artists, and one of Ross’s favorite cartoonists. His beautiful full page drawings were a regular feature in the magazine. Mr. Williams illustrated a number of Robert Benchley’s collections, providing the cover art as well as illustrations. New Yorker work: March 13, 1926 – Aug 25, 1951. Key collections: The Gluyas Williams Book ( Doubleday, Doran & Co., 1929), The Gluyas Williams Gallery (Harper, 1956). Website: http://www.gluyaswilliams.com/

Further reading on Mr. Williams, link here to Edward Sorel’s 1984 American Heritage piece, “The World Of Gluyas Williams”

____________________________________________________________

Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Spooky NYC Real Estate by Lila Ash, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2018.  Visit her website here.

 

 

___________________________________________________________

A Cartoon Excerpt From “Everyone’s A Critic” On Lit Hub

From Literary Hub, October 24, 2019, “Six Cartoonists On Critical Failure, One Panel At A Time”

— the selection includes work from Barbara Smaller, Mick Stevens, Edward Koren, William Haefeli, and this one from P.C. Vey.

“My wife! My best friend! Advance uncorrected galleys of my new book!”

 

 

 

 

More Gahan Wilson; A Peter Arno Rarity From The Bloom Vault; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon; Humor Mag Of Interest: American Bystander #12; Today’s Daily Shouts…By Amy Kurzweil; Preview Of Interest on Salon: Shannon Wheeler’s “Mueller Report”

More Gahan Wilson

From 27East.com, October 24, 2019, “Cartoonist Gahan Wilson Is Looking To Find His Way”  — this piece by Annette Hinkle on one of the modern masters of the form.

…and this Chicago Sun-Times column from Neil Steinberg, October 24, 2019, “‘Lucky to be alive’ — morbid cartoonist faces dementia”

_________________________________________________________

A Peter Arno Rarity From The Bloom Vault

The illustrator Tom Bloom is surely one of our cartoon world’s great collectors.  Some years back  I naively thought I’d found most everything New Yorker cartoon-related that could be found. Then Mr. Bloom began sending me scans of items in his collection. It was as if someone had just opened the door to a New Yorker materials filled annex the size of Macy’s.

He’s been kind enough over the years to share some of the more obscure pieces from his collection with the Spill.  Here’s another: a four page promotional brochure for Peter Arno’s first book,Whoops Dearie!, published in 1927 by Simon & Schuster.* If you read my bio of Arno you might remember how important the Whoops Sisters were to the resuscitation of The  New Yorker in its infancy. I’d never seen this brochure until yesterday (and this after nearly 20 years of making it my business to find Arno material).

*While Arno provided the drawings for the book it was actually written by Philip Wylie. Much more on him and his place in The New Yorker‘s early years can be found in the Arno biography.

Here’s Arno’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Peter Arno (Photo source: Look, 1938) Born Curtis Arnoux Peters, Jr., January 8, 1904, New York City. Died February 22, 1968, Port Chester, NY. New Yorker work: 1925 -1968. Key collection: Ladies & Gentlemen (Simon & Schuster, 1951) The Foreword is by Arno.

 

 

_____________________________________________________

Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Barging Republicans, by Ellis Rosen, who has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2016.  Visit his website here.

 

 

_______________________________________________________________

Humor Mag Of Interest: American Bystander #12

American Bystander #12 just arrived at the Spill. Not sure how often I’ve said this, but here goes again: if you love cartoons, especially those we associate with New Yorker artists, you’ll find  bushels-full in the Bystander. Three cheers for Michael Gerber, the Bystander‘s editor and publisher.

Here are the New Yorker contributors found in this latest issue:  Joe Ciardiello (the issue’s cover artist), Edward Sorel, Tom Chitty, P.S. Mueller, Rich Sparks, Lars Kenseth, Lila Ash, Roz Chast, John Cuneo, Mort Gerberg, Barry Blitt, George Booth, Joe Dator, Nick Downes, Bob Eckstein, Emily Flake, David Ostow, Jeremy Nguyen, Sara Lautman, Farley Katz, John Jonik, and Sam Gross.

Link here to subscribe.

_________________________________________________

Today’s Daily Shouts…By Amy Kurzweil

“A Subway Tableau” by Amy Kurzweil, who has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2016. Visit her website here.

 

________________________________________________

Preview Of Interest From Salon: Wheeler’s “Mueller Report”

From Salon, “Exclusive: ‘Mueller Report’ Graphic Novel Sneak Preview From New Yorker Cartoonist Shannon Wheeler”

— and…there’s a Q&A with Mr. Wheeler within the piece.