Wednesday’s Spill: Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon…And Yesterday’s; Two New (Old) Additions To The Spill’s Cartoon Library

Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon…And Yesterday’s

Julia Suits on turning the page.  Ms. Suits began contributing to The New Yorker in 2006.

Yesterday’s Daily cartoonist was Sara Lautman. Ms. Lautman began contributing to the magazine in 2016.

 

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Two New (Old) Additions To The Spill’s Cartoon Library

Just arrived here at Spill headquarters: two books from the 1940s (Madam Chairman, Members and Guests, from 1942, and I Feel Like A Cad, from 1944. I was curious about the Hokinson illustrated book because the title suggested the possibility of a book full of Hokinson drawings (Ms. Hokinson specialized in and became famous for her club lady drawings). Sadly, there are only six, all of them reprinted from The New Yorker. Still, a beautiful cover, and a good addition to the Hokinson illustrated book collection.

Here’s Ms. Hokinson’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Helen Hokinson (above) Born, Illinois,1893; died, Washington, D.C., 1949. New Yorker work: 1925 -1949, with some work published posthumously. All of Hokinson’s collections are wonderful, but here are two favorites. Her first collection: So You’re Going To Buy A Book! (Minton, Balch & Co, 1931) and what was billed as “the final Hokinson collection”: The Hokinson Festival (Dutton & Co., 1956). According to a New Yorker document produced during Harold Ross’s editorship (1925-1951) rating their artists, Ms. Hokinson and Peter Arno occupied a special category unto themselves above all others.

 

The other book was acquired because I’d never seen a collection of cartoons* by (Sgt.) Larry Reynolds, a three time contributor to The New Yorker.  All three of his New Yorker drawings were published before this book came out (and do not appear here). I Feel Like A Cad consists of cartoons about Reynold’s bumbling burglaring cartoon character, Butch, whose exploits, at the time of the book’s publication, had appeared in Colliers Weekly for eight years.

The photo of Mr. Reynolds from the back of his book.

And a self-portrait of Mr. Reynolds that appeared, along with a jokey biography, in the anthology  Collier Collects Its Wits, published in 1941.

For a whole lot more on Mr. Reynolds, visit Allan Holtz’s Strippers Guide.

*Mr. Holtz mentions a book published in 1941, Lines Of Least Resistance:  “collected Reynolds’s cartoons from Collier’s, the Saturday Evening Post, the New Yorker and Elks Magazine.”

It’s apparently a book of poems by the author Laurence McKinney, with Reynolds drawings included as illustrations.

 

Weekend Spill: Video Studio Tour Of Interest: Bob Eckstein; The Tilley Watch Online, June 22- 26, 2020

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Here’s a fun 6 minute video of Bob Eckstein’s studio.  Mr. Eckstein began contributing to The New Yorker in 2007.  He’s authored and edited an number of books, most recently the Ultimate Cartoon Book series for Princeton Architectural Press.

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An end of week listing of New Yorker artists who’ve contributed to newyorker.com features

The Daily Cartoon: Brendan Loper (twice), Lisa Rothstein, Farley Katz, Emily Flake.

Daily Shouts: Olivia de Recat (with Julia Edelman), J.A.K..

…and Barry Blitt’s Kvetchbook

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Fave Photo Of The Day: Liza Donnelly Drawing At The Norman Rockwell Museum; A Case For Pencils Spotlights Teresa Burns Parkhurst; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon; Yesterday’s Daily Shouts Cartoonist

Liza Donnelly, whose work has been appearing in The New Yorker since 1982, was at The Norman Rockwell Museum yesterday morning  painting a mural in preparation for her exhibit there in mid-July. This will be Ms. Donnelly’s first-ever solo show of her work.

There will be a virtual opening event on July 10th at 5:30 at the museum. Ms. Donnelly will show you around the exhibit and answer questions.  Details will be on the Spill as we get closer to the date.

To see a short video of Ms. Donnelly working on the wall, go here to Instagram.

Link here to Donnelly’s website.

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A Case For Pencils Spotlights Teresa Burns Parkhurst

From Jane Mattimoe’s fab blog, this post on Teresa Burns Parkhurst, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2017.

Shown: Ms. Parkhurst’s work place (cropped).

To see all of the cartoonists that’ve been spotlighted on Case, go here.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Brendan Loper on a distant polling place.

Mr. Loper began contributing to The New Yorker in March of 2016.

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Yesterday’s Daily Shouts Cartoonist

From Olivia de Recat (with Julia Edelman): “Dating Material: ‘That Guy’ Dissected”

Ms. de Recat has contributed to The New Yorker since February of 2018.

 

 

Thurber Thursday: The Tome; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

There are two fave Thurber biographies in this house: Burton Bernstein’s Thurber: A Biography, and Harrison Kinney’s James Thurber: His Life And Times. I like to think of them as perfect bookends to any Thurber collection.

Bernstein’s (left), at 532 pages is the quick read; Kinney’s is 1,238. I think of the two books as I think of my two favorite Beatle biographies: Shout, by Philip Norman (c.400 pages), and Tune In by Mark Lewisohn (c.900 pages).  If you want a great read, well written, but don’t want to submerge, then it’s Norman’s Beatle book. If you want to go deep and stay there, it’s Lewisohn’s. Same applies to Bernstein and Kinney.

Both these books have appeared in paperback and are easily found.  I just may go back to Kinney’s right after I finish re-reading Tune In.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Video conference hell from Lisa Rothstein, who began contributing to The New Yorker in August of 2019.

The Swann Cartoon Auction Is Back!; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

The Swann Illustration Auction, postponed because of you-know-what, is now on for July 16th. The catalog isn’t online as of this morning, but you can see what’s up for grabs, including original work by some of the masters: Helen Hokinson, Charles Addams, William Steig, Barbara Shermund, Frank Modell (whose Don’t Trust Anyone Over 10 drawing appears here), Edward Sorel, Lee Lorenz, Charles Martin (C.E.M), Gahan Wilson, George Booth (see below), Richard Taylor, and more.  Go here to see for yourself.

(Work by New Yorker artists begins in earnest in the lot #200 range, but there are New Yorker artist pieces sprinkled elsewhere. For instance, if you go to lot #121 you’ll find a non-New Yorker piece by the great Rea Irvin).

Left: original George Booth cover art (published April 19, 1993) Lot #213

 

— My thanks to Stephen Nadler of Attempted Bloggery for passing along word of the auction.

 

 

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Farley Katz on going back out there.

Mr. Katz has been contributing to The New Yorker since

2007. Visit his website here.