More Peter Arno; The Tilley Watch

Arno cover 2

Arno workbooks

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Another installment from the Department of Self-Promotion, this interview by Alex Dueben posted today on The Comics Journal site.

 

 

 

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Tilley Watch...

 

 

 

 

 

Finck:Stokes

Here’s a fun video featuring cartoonist Liana Finck and Colin Stokes, The New Yorker‘s Cartoon Assistant (and occasional cartoon collaborator).

Panckeri Pencilled; More Gus Mager

tumblr_inline_o82aqwXtD21sj0qh6_500Drew Panckeri is up next on Jane Mattimoe’s terrif blog, A Case For Pencils.

Read all about Mr. Panckeri’s tools of the trade here.

 

 

 

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mager19060930-WHat-Little-Johnny-Wanted-650x424From The Comics Journal, June 1, 2016, here’s “The Lost Sundays of Gus Mager 1904-1906”, Part 2 of Paul Tumey’s close look at the artist’s work.

 

 

 

 

 

As a reminder of Mr. Mager’s New Yorker connection, here’s  Ink Spill’s “New Yorker Cartoonists A-Z” entry for him:

Gus Mager (photo above) Born, 1878, Newark, New Jersey. Died, July 17, 1956, Murrysville, Penn. NYer work: 5 cartoons, March – July of 1925. It should be noted that a character named “Groucho” in Mr. Mager’s “Monk Family” comic strip was the inspiration for Julius Marx’s stage name, “Groucho.” Read more about it here

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gus Mager Gets His Due; Pat Byrnes Pencilled

From The Comics Journal, May 18, 2016,  this lengthy informative piece by Paul Tumey, “The Screwball Comics of Gus Mager: Hippos, Monks and Sherlock Holmes” —  Read it here.

Ink Spill’s New Yorker Cartoonists A-Z entry for Gus Mager:

  Born, 1878, Newark, New Jersey. Died, July 17, 1956, Murrysville, Penn.

New Yorker work: 5 cartoons, March – July of 1925. It should be noted that a character named “Groucho” in Mr. Mager’s “Monk Family” comic strip was the inspiration for Julius Marx’s stage name, “Groucho.” Read more about it here

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pat B

Pat Byrnes joins the ever expanding list of New Yorker cartoonists sharing their tools of the trade on Jane Mattimoe’s blog, A Case For Pencils. See Mr. Byrnes entry here.

 

Gehr’s latest Know Your New Yorker Cartoonist Interview: Edward Koren; Donnelly on Navasky’s “Art of Controversy”; Article of Interest: Al Frueh

 

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From The Comics Journal, June 12, 2013, “The Beastly Beatitudes of Edward Koren” — this latest entry by Richard Gehr in his series, “Know Your New Yorker Cartoonist”

 

 

 

 

 

 

And…

From Forbes.com, June 12, 2013, “Women and the Art of Controversy”Liza Donnelly reviews Victor Navasky’s new book.

 

From limaohio.com, September 12, 2012, “Just Al: Frueh made it big but stayed humble”

 

 

Almost everyone’s familiar with The New Yorker’s first cover, Rea Irvin’s dandy with the top hat, later dubbed  Eustace Tilley.  But how many of us know who did the second cover? SYK4mI4-xwzbsTSbbLvPNr3ocr-yFiskgF_taE1WVmH-14aFAjmnSaboPpILHuVLVu4ERcgv1IlObybjAWx1RVTQNL-sxsqTXLHaYwDyS4SlOoubUYYtBZlkUPn7ZzpBpWYnsg6SXQyTchzAlenPYdk=s120-c Here’s a capsule bio of the great Al Frueh, who not only was a cartoonist and cover artist, but an illustrator who carved out a spectacular niche for himself doing the caricatures that accompanied the New Yorker’s Theater reviews.