Audio Interview Of Interest: Edward Koren; Article Of Interest; Art Young; …and More Spills!

From Vermont Public Radio, November 26, 2018 “Ed Koren Talks Cartooning And His ‘Wild’ New Collection” — an enjoyable short interview (just under a half hour) with one of our modern New Yorker cartoon masters.

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Book Of Interest; Art Young

To Laugh That We May Not Weep: The Life and Times of Art Young has been around since the summer of 2017, but here’s a long Comics Journal article recently posted about the book and the artist:  “The Life and Dedication of Art Young: an Impassioned Cartoonist of  Uncompromising Principle”.

Mr. Young’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Born January 14, 1866, Illinois. Died December 29, New York City atThe Hotel Irving. An online biography. 1943. New Yorker work: 1925 -1933. The Art Young Gallery

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Attempted Bloggery on the New Yorker‘s Archival Issue.

The New York Times on Roz Chast‘s exhibit at the School of Visual Arts.

…News of a Bob Eckstein event coming up December 6th, and another reminder about his New York Public Library event tomorrow.

 

 

Biography of An Ink Spill One Clubber: John Stanley

Here’s something: a biography of John Stanley, a member of Ink Spill‘s One Club  (a club made up of cartoonists who had only one cartoon published in the New Yorker during their career. The icon shown here accompanies the entry on the Spill’s A-Z for every cartoonist in the club ). 

Mr. Stanley had a much larger career in the comic book world, as you’ll see when you link to this Comics Journal interview with Bill Schelly, the author of John Stanley: Giving Life to Little Lulu. If you scroll down  to the fourth question you’ll get right to Mr. Stanley’s association with the New Yorker, as well as see his one New Yorker cartoon.

Here’s john Stanley’s entry on Ink Spill’s A-Z:

John Stanley (pictured above) Born March 22, 1914; died, November 11, 1993. New Yorker work: one eight panel captionless drawing, March 15, 1947.

Latest New Yorker Cartoons Rated; R.C. Harvey’s Lengthy Look at Gluyas Williams

 

 

 

 Click here to see the new Cartoon Companion  where you’ll find a considered (and rated) assessment of all the cartoons in the latest New Yorker.  As usual, a Mystery Cartoonist is along for the fun.  You’ll also run across an un-mysterious me prattling on about my drawing in this issue, which began life, Thurber-ish, with a seal in a living room:

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From The Comics Journal, April 3, 2017, “Gluyas Williams: Master of Line and Shape and Subject” — R. C. Harvey looks at one of the New Yorker‘s great cartoonists.  

Left: A 1929 collection of Mr. William’s work

Here’s the Gluyas Williams entry on the Spill‘s “New Yorker Cartoonists A-Z”:

Gluyas Williams (photo above) Born, San Francisco, 1888. Died, Boston, Mass., 1982. One of the pillars of Harold Ross’s stable of artists, and one of Ross’s favorite cartoonists. His beautiful full page drawings were a regular feature in the magazine. Mr. Williams illustrated a number of Robert Benchley’s collections, providing the cover art as well as illustrations. NYer work: March 13, 1926 – Aug 25, 1951. Key collections: The Gluyas Williams Book ( Doubleday, Doran & Co., 1929), The Gluyas Williams Gallery (Harper, 1956). Website: http://www.gluyaswilliams.com/

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A Note to Ink Spill Visitors:

As Ink Spill  approaches its tenth birthday in August, it’s undergoing its first sprucing up: a new heading here and there (“Sections” & “Posts” for instance), a slightly less cramped look making for an easier read, perhaps some shifting of content. All the major sections (The A-Z, The Library, In the Attic)  will remain, with a few minor ones saying bye-bye.  

 

 

 

 

R.C. Harvey’s Trip Down Mankoff Lane

From The Comics Journal, March 27, 2017, “A Look Back at 20 Years of Mankoff’s New Yorker” — R.C. Harvey takes a look at Bob Mankoff’s not-quite 20 year term (August of 1997 – April of 2017) as The New Yorker‘s cartoon editor in this longish piece that covers much ground found in Mankoff’s memoir, How About Never — Is Never Good For You: My Life in Cartoons (Henry Holt, 2014), as well as the very current events surrounding Mr. Mankoff’s imminent departure.

There are a few things in Mr. Harvey’s piece I’m going to quibble with. I’ve reproduced them here, bolded and italicized.

New Yorker cartoons are topical (and always have been) but not as front-page topical as newspaper editorial cartoons. For decades, thanks to the magazine’s founder’s Puritan bent, sex was taboo as a subject for cartoons.

New Yorker cartoons can be topical, but they are not always topical, and they have not always been topical, nor are they all topical now.  For instance,  these two drawings, perhaps two of the most famous in the magazine’s canon: James Thurber’s so-called Seal in the Bedroom, and Charles Addams famous skier who has somehow managed to ski through a pine tree.  If there’s something topical about them, I don’t see it.

As for sex as a taboo, well what are we talking about here exactly?  Barbara Shermund’s and Peter Arno’s work mined the subject of sex in the New Yorker for decades on end.  Mr. Arno, of course, made quite a nice career out of providing the New Yorker‘s readership with sex-based drawings.

By the time Lorenz was cartoon editor, cartoonists were expected to both write and draw their cartoons. (In fact, to reveal an undisguised bias of mine, true cartooning, blending words and picture, can most happily take place in a cartoonist’s mind, not a writer’s. Which may account for the typically inert comedy that prevailed at The New Yorker for so many of its first decades. And, even—inevitably—into current decades.)

Not really sure where  “by the time Lorenz was cartoon editor, cartoonists were expected to both write and draw their cartoons” comes from. It is simply not the case.  As one who was brought into The New Yorker by Mr. Lorenz, the subject of what was expected never came up. The word “expect” just isn’t part of the New Yorker cartoonist/editor language. Forty years later, I can say that the subject never came up with Mr. Lorenz, or his successor.

As for “…the typically inert comedy that prevailed at The New Yorker for so many of its first decades” Mr. Harvey has a right to his opinion, of course, but “inert” is not a word I’d apply to the earliest New Yorker cartoons. In fact, if you look through the magazine’s first three decades  what you will see is plenty of cartoon movement across the page and within the cartoons themselves. Take a look at the work of Reginald Marsh, or Thurber, or Barlow, or Hoff or Johan Bull (I could go on listing names, but you get the point).   Mr. Bull was a frequent contributor in the magazine’s earliest days –his lovely drawings  were barely kept within the borders of the page. And Mr. Marsh’s drawings were electric.  There was a graphic  playfulness to much of the work then; it subsided, appropriately enough, with the advent of the second world war.  If you want to go looking for inert drawings, you’ll find them easily enough and in every issue, but I would say they did not prevail — they were a bit of balance, some down-time Harold Ross so wisely provided his readers.