New York Historical Society “Superheroes in Gotham” exhibit includes a New Yorker Cartoon

NYHSThe New York Historical Society has an upcoming event, “Superheroes in Gotham” that includes, according the the website CBR, a Superman cartoon by Mort Gerberg.   For more New Yorker Superman cartoons (and Batman) by a variety of the magazine’s artists go The New Yorker‘s Cartoon Bank site and type in your preference in the search box. At last look, there were a little over 60 Superman cartoons to be found on the site and just over 20 Batman cartoons (remember, the site isn’t all-inclusive of the magazine’s cartoon archive).

 

For more information on the exhibit:

Link here to the New York Historical Society website

Book of Interest: The Complete Dick Tracy, Vol. 19: 1959 – 61

Dick TracyFrom time-to-time I momentarily take Ink Spill outside The New Yorker cartoon orbit  — in this case a brief auto-biographical moment.

As a kid I was deep into Batman and Superman comic books as well as the Dick Tracy newspaper comic strips.  While they’ve never been all that obvious an influence on my own drawings in The New Yorker, they’re mixed in the foundation (along with a whole bunch of other comic book & comic strip characters).

This particular volume of Dick Tracy strips hits particularly close to home as it covers the years when I was first introduced to Chester Gould’s world, wrapped around the Sunday editions of New York’s  Daily News.

The Complete Dick Tracy, Volume 19: 1959 – 1961,  IDW Publishing,  will be in book stores  October 15th.

Book of Interest: Masterful Marks / Cartoonists Who Changed the World

masterful-marks-9781451649192_lg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Coming out this September from Simon & Schuster, Masterful Marks: Cartoonists Who Changed the World by Monte Beauchamp (included are a Charles Addams bio by Marc Rosenthal  and a Robert Crumb bio by Drew Friedman).

From the publisher’s website:

In a first-of-its-kind collection, award-winning illustrators celebrate the lives of the visionary artists who created the world of comic art and altered pop culture forever.

From the Publishers Weekly review:

Former Blab editor Monte Beauchamp tasked 16 cartoonists with the creation of graphic portraits of the medium’s biggest legends, from Superman’s Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster to the “father of manga,” Osama Tezuka. Sadly, the list of greats lacks women, reinforcing the erroneous idea that there weren’t any prominent female cartoonists active during the period covered. The artists’ approaches to biography are as diverse as the subject matter; their best work avoids straight biographical exposition.

 

Link to Publishers Weekly review.

Link to Simon & Schusters Masterful Marks page.

In a first-of-its-kind collection, award-winning illustrators celebrate the lives of the visionary artists who created the world of comic art and altered pop culture forever.

No one has told the story of comic art in its own medium, until now. In Masterful Marks, top illustrators—including Drew Friedman, Nora Krug, Denis Kitchen, and Peter Kuper—reveal how sixteen visionary cartoonists overcame massive financial, political, and personal challenges to create a new form of art that now defines our world. – See more at: http://books.simonandschuster.com/Masterful-Marks/Monte-Beauchamp/9781451649192#sthash.1aiFaou0.dpuf

In a first-of-its-kind collection, award-winning illustrators celebrate the lives of the visionary artists who created the world of comic art and altered pop culture forever.

No one has told the story of comic art in its own medium, until now. In Masterful Marks, top illustrators—including Drew Friedman, Nora Krug, Denis Kitchen, and Peter Kuper—reveal how sixteen visionary cartoonists overcame massive financial, political, and personal challenges to create a new form of art that now defines our world. – See more at: http://books.simonandschuster.com/Masterful-Marks/Monte-Beauchamp/9781451649192#sthash.1aiFaou0.dpuf

In a first-of-its-kind collection, award-winning illustrators celebrate the lives of the visionary artists who created the world of comic art and altered pop culture forever.

No one has told the story of comic art in its own medium, until now. In Masterful Marks, top illustrators—including Drew Friedman, Nora Krug, Denis Kitchen, and Peter Kuper—reveal how sixteen visionary cartoonists overcame massive financial, political, and personal challenges to create a new form of art that now defines our world. – See more at: http://books.simonandschuster.com/Masterful-Marks/Monte-Beauchamp/9781451649192#sthash.1aiFaou0.dpuf

It’s Not All About New Yorker Cartoons…But Mostly It Is

 

 

 

It makes sense that the shelves of the cartoon library of two New Yorker cartoonists would be sagging under the weight of New Yorker cartoon collections. But a  large fragment of what makes up our cartoon library has little to do with New Yorker cartoons and a lot to do with work that initially inspired us, and with newer work that continues to inspire.

 

Pictured above is a condensed collection — a mini-library — of non-New Yorker books that I keep near my office (my wife has her own mini-library in her office). There’re a lot of books devoted to Superman and Batman, and that’s exactly how it should be.  Those were my earliest influences along with a few Sunday Funnies, such as Blondie and Dick Tracy.  And then, of course, there was Mad (I’m especially fond of Mad Cover To Cover).

 

The two Smithsonian collections pictured (Comic-Book Comics and Newspaper Comics) are essential cartoon library books.  The R. Crumb books are there because his work acted as bridge  connecting the years I devoted to comic books with my earliest days of discovering New Yorker cartoonists (Crumb himself began contributing to The New Yorker in the 1990s and then stopped contributing due to…well, let’s leave that for another post).

There’re a number of books devoted to graphic novels.  I had the graphic novel fever for a while.   The Marx Brothers Scrapbook in the photo sits next to Monty Python Speaks!   Neither are cartoon collections, but it’s fitting that they are represented.  Their work was and is as graphically inspiring as any of the others on the shelves.

A handful of  New Yorker contributors books are part of this mini-library (Crumb, for instance, as well as Edward Sorel, Ward Sutton, Daniel Clowes,  and Seth), but these books are from their other fields of interest.

The eagle-eyed will spot an actual New Yorker collection.  It makes no sense that it’s there and I can only think it has to do with its origin —  it’s a French collection.