The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of March 16, 2020

The Cover: Talk about yer timely cover: you might think that the cover on the left, by I. G. Haupt, is this week’s New Yorker cover, but it’s not. It appeared August 31, 1929*, not too long before “Black Monday”; the cover on the right appears this week on the magazine — “The Spring & Style” Issue. I’m reminded of The Rolling Stones song, Dandelion, and its catchy “Blow away dandelion, blow away dandelion.”

*Oddly, the Aug.29, 1929 issue is not included in the magazine’s digital archive available to subscribers. If you go to the archive, and look through the 1929 issues you’ll see there’s a gap between the issue of August 24, 1929 (Helen Hokinson cover) and September 7, 1929 (Sue Williams cover). Luckily, I have a copy, but what if you don’t.

The Cartoonists:

As with the other week, I’m showing the entire list of Artists as the Spots artist is Benoit van Innis who has provided a number of splendid covers over the years.

The Cartoons:

A truly wonderful drawing in this issue by Ed Steed (it’s on page 46), and a very clever idea by Will McPhail on page 38. Other drawings that caught my eye: P.C. Vey’s what’s under the bed cartoon (page 36), Drew Panckeri’s lion in a barber shop (p. 69), and Liana Finck’s fitbit drawing (p.66).

 

The Rea Irvin Talk Masthead Watch:

The above has not been seen in The New Yorker since May of 2017.  Read about it here.

 

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue of July 2, 2018

  Link here to read what Barry Blitt had to say about his tied-in to the headlines cover (shown above).

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One of these days I’m going to gather all the New Yorker covers that’ve incorporated the Statue of Liberty. For now, I took a look back to see when Lady Liberty first appeared on a New Yorker cover. Surprisingly, it took awhile to show up what with the the magazine being, in those earliest of issues, so New York City-centric. Its debut was on the Sue Williams cover of September 7, 1929:

 The Statue’s next appearance was on the cover of June 24, 1939, when artist Leonard Dove incorporated it humorously:

It wasn’t until the end of WW2 that the statue appeared again — in the issue dated the week the war ended with Japan’s surrender. Alan Dunn shows us a troop ship arriving home in New York Harbor; soldiers are sticking their heads out of portholes, looking to see Lady Liberty way off in the distance, her silhouette just barely decipherable. Graphically speaking, in this instance less is powerfully more.

And now on to the current issue, close to seventy-three years later.  From the Dept. of Just Sayin’:  21 illustrations this week, 3 of them full pages. Just 10 cartoons (plus one full page by Ed Steed).

Noting two of the ten this week: Roz Chast makes excellent use of one of the cartoonist’s handiest tools: the hot dog cart. In this case it’s floss being sold not franks. What I really like about Ms. Chast’s cartoon is that it falls into the wonderful New Yorker cartoon vein of being both surprising and highly relatable. It delivers on Peter Arno’s definition of a good cartoon: a drawing that deals a one-two punch.  If the Spill handed out ribbons like they do over on the Cartoon Companion site, this cartoon would be awarded one. The Spill does, however, applaud.

The other cartoon noted is by Seth Fleishman.  Bulls driving racing cars at Pamplona, with the lead car driven by a person.  A lovely drawing. I believe there are at least two Charles Addams cartoons with a moose driving a car, but bulls driving cars is a rarity. One somewhat closer to Mr. Fleishman’s that comes readily to mind (forgive me) is a drawing of mine from the ancient times. It appeared in The New Yorker, March 7, 1989 — technically, those are steer.

 

For the record, your honor, here’s the list of cartoonists in the issue (the aforementioned Mr. Steed’s page is listed higher up on the Table of Contents):

Lastly, here’s Rea Irvin’s iconic masthead from The New Yorker.  It disappeared in May of 2017, bafflingly replaced by a redrawn version. For more on this, go here.

— See you next week