Cover Revealed! Harry Bliss & Steve Martin’s “A Wealth Of Pigeons”; Searle’s 100th Celebrated; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon (…And Yesterday’s)

And now there’s a cover for the Harry Bliss & Steve Martin collaborative cartoon collection. We’ll see it on sale November 17th (Celadon Books). The Spill first ran a piece about their New Yorker duo efforts back in March of 2019.

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Searle’s 100th Celebrated

Today marks the 100th birthday of the late great Ronald Searle, New Yorker cartoonist & cover artist. A Spill fave blog, Attempted Bloggery has been celebrating for weeks; see today’s post here. Also visit Perpetua, the Searle “tribute” blog.

Mr. Searle’s Spill A-Z entry:

Ronald Searle  Born, Cambridge, England March 3, 1920. Died, December 30, 2011, Draguignan, France. Steven Heller, who wrote Searle’s obit for The New York Times (Jan 4, 2012) said Searle’s “outlandishly witty illustrations for books, magazine covers, newspaper editorial pages and advertisements helped define postwar graphic humor…”

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon (…and Yesterday’s)

Elisabeth McNair on Purell & crime.

Ms. McNair began contributing to The New Yorker in July of 2017. Visit her website here.

…Yesterday’s Daily cartoonist: Ali Solomon on Super Tuesday.

Ms. Solomon began contributing to The New Yorker in November of 2018.

 

 

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of February 3, 2020; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Daily Shouts Cartoonist

The Cover: a snowy bridge. Read the Q&A with the cover artist here, and see the pretty digital snowflakes fall.

The Cartoonists:

The Cartoons:

In a throw back to earlier Monday Tilley Watches, I’ll take a quick tour through all the cartoons in the issue; a mostly text-driven drive-by of the work.

The first drawing, by David Sipress, references the recent demise of Mr. Peanut (is he really gone, or was it just a dream?). The topic of the late legume was recently covered here.

…Julia Suits’s pirate in cargo shorts on a gangplank is next (cannot see cargo shorts/pants on a New Yorker cartoon character without thinking of the below cargo pants drawing by the late great Leo Cullum — it appeared in The New Yorker,  August 17, 1998:

…The third cartoon (oh, alright: drawing) in the issue belongs to Barbara Smaller, who’s been contributing to the magazine since 1996.  A bedroom, a married couple, and a reasonable question.

…next is a Zach Kanin poker game (assuming it’s poker — I see chips on the table). I really like the three card players Mr. Kanin has drawn. The fellow to the left looks a little like Ernest Borgnine (with a pinch of Broderick Crawford tossed in?):

To me, the guy on the far right resembles Mandy Patinkin.

…next up: Liana Finck on an age-old flooring concern. Nice floating ghost.

…Harry Bliss and one of his collaborators (Steve Martin) address a potential problem for passengers on one of those floating mini-cities sailing the seven seas.

…five pages later: an Emily Flake drawing far far removed from her usual style and cartoon concerns. Think Hindenburg disaster mashed with social media done in a sort of Stuart Leeds style.

…on page 45, a Tersa Burns Parkhurst retirement party. Dunno why but the cartoon reminds me of MAD magazine’s Dave Berg’s “Lighter Side Of…” drawings (that’s a good thing!).

…on page 43 is a drawing by Mick Stevens, one of the most veteran artists in this issue.  He began contributing in December of 1979 (Roz Chast in this issue with a full page color Sketchbook, beats him out by more than a year– her first drawing appeared in June of 1978).  I wonder if the male dancing bird in Mr. Stevens’s drawing was originally in color. Either way (color, or b&w), a fab cartoon.

…David Borchart’s auto rental drawing (page 43) gets a Spill gold star for the use of the word “rassle.” Zeke, the fellow that’s prepared to rassle, is also mighty terrific.

…On page 54 is an Ed Steed drawing that at first glance reminds me of Zach Kanin’s in this same issue, but only because, in both drawings, the viewer is seeing a table front and center and from near precisely the same angle. Instead of card players (as seen in Mr. Kanin’s drawing) we have animated garden utensils and tools. They’re plotting something.

…next up is a Robert Leighton drawing of mountain climbers.  I love how Mr. Leighton has immediately tossed us into a situation that would normally demand the best possible equipment available. You gotta feel for the climber who came unprepared.

…Thoroughly enjoyed  — as usual with Lars Kenseth’s work — his drawing of campers situated down on the ground, and in much nicer weather than Mr. Leighton’s. Look at the care he took in adding the reflection of the moon on the lake.

…next up is a three panel hat x-ray drawing by Liza Donnelly ( who began contributing to The New Yorker in 1982). This drawing answers the oft-asked question of what could possibly occupy all that beanie air space. Love the kitty!

Lastly, Adam Douglas Thompson (the most junior artist in this issue — his first drawing appeared in The New Yorker in the issue of April 8, 2019) gives us a sort of contemporary Chon Day drawing (it’s on page 68). “Sort of” because Mr. Thompson’s line and Mr. Day’s line have different flows.

The Rea Irvin Talk Masthead Watch:

This man (Rea Irvin) is wondering what happened to his beautiful Talk masthead design (shown below). You know — the one that appeared in The New Yorker for 92 years, not the re-draw that’s been around since May of 2017.  Who took the iconic masthead away, and why, and where oh where can it be? Actually, the answer to the first question is easy. Perhaps the last question is easy as well.  It likely resides in a file on a desktop, easily accessed. The question of why is the puzzler. Read more about its disappearance here.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Daily Shouts Cartoonist

The Daily Cartoon: by Brendan Loper, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2016.

…and a Daily Shouts by J. A. K., who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2014.

 

Two Peacocks Walk Into A Room; Rare Book Of Interest: A John M. Price Cartoon Anthology: Sara Lautman’s Daily Shouts; Today’s Daily Cartoonist: Avi Steinberg

In one of those million-to-one cartoon moments, both my colleague Harry Bliss (with his collaborator Steve Martin) and I have similar drawings out this week (his in his syndicated daily spot, and mine in The New Yorker). What’s unusual, besides the timing of publication, and the peacock standing in a doorway in both drawings, is the use of the peacock itself. A quick visit to the New Yorker‘s Cartoon Bank site turned up peacock drawings by a dozen artists. I have to think there were a number more in the magazine’s ninety-four years (the Cartoon Bank site does not provide every cartoon in the magazine’s archive). The listed peacock drawings are by: Mick Stevens, Sam Gross, Will McPhail, John O’Brien, George Booth, Bernard Schoenbaum, George Price, Edward Koren, Saul Steinberg (he has three), Robert Day, Mort Gerberg, and Victoria Roberts. There were also three peacock covers shown. The artists:  Joseph Low (the peacock is a minor character in his cover), Steinberg, and the one-and-only Rea Irvin. 

I asked Mr. Bliss if he’d like to comment on our dual peacock drawings, and here’s what he had to say:

That’s crazy! I didn’t get my new issue of The New Yorker yet, so I didn’t even know that was in there.  When I initially did my drawing, from an idea given to me by Steve Martin, I think I mentioned to Emma [Emma Allen, The New Yorker‘s cartoon editor] that I wanted it to be in color. Seeing yours now, makes me wonder if they bought yours before they had seen mine and the reason they didn’t buy mine and Steve’s is because they had already bought yours… Similars? Anyway, I think the reason there aren’t that many peacock cartoons out there is because the damn thing is so hard to draw!

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Rare Book Of Interest: A John M. Price Anthology

Warren Bernard (of SPX fame) has alerted the Spill to another rarity: a cartoon collection of work by John M. Price who contributed four drawings to the magazine (Mr. Bernard tells me that three of Mr. Price’s four New Yorker drawings appear in the collection). Here’s Price’s rather skimpy bio on the A-Z (if anyone out there has more info please send this way):

John M. Price Born  (Pennsylvania?) February 5, 1918, died January 19, 2009, Radnor, Pennsylvania. New Yorker work: February 17, 1940, March 9, 1940, June 8, 1941, and August 30, 1941. His work appeared in many publications, including The Saturday Evening Post, Esquire, The Country Gentleman, and Colliers. Key collection (self published) Don’t Get Polite with Me.

*Chris Wheeler’s fabulous site also has a scan of Price’s book (including the back cover), but I have to admit the cover never registered in my brain’s cartoon catalog. Now, having registered it, the book becomes a must-have for the Spill‘s library.  

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A Daily Shouts By…

Sara Lautman, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2016, contributed yesterday’s Daily Shouts.

 

 

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist/Cartoon

 

An Avi Steinberg summer vacation/global warming cartoon. Mr. Steinberg began contributing to The New Yorker in 2012.  More about him here on Jane Mattimoe’s Case For Pencils.

 

 

Darrin Bell Wins Pulitzer For Editorial Cartooning; The Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of April 22, 2019; Today’s Daily Cartoonist: Elisabeth McNair; Bliss & Martin, Cont’d

Darrin Bell Wins Pulitzer For Editorial Cartooning

From The Washington Post, April 15, 2019, “How the Trayvon Martin tragedy led to Darrin Bell’s historical editorial cartooning Pulitzer.”  Mr. Bell began contributing to The New Yorker in 2016. Link to his website here.

(Above: Mr. Bell, and one of his New Yorker cartoons, published July 9, 2018)

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The Cover:  Loveis Wise’s piece is added to the magazine’s collection of “covers about grooming.”  Read about it here.

The Cartoonists:

The Cartoons: Becky Barnicoat makes her New Yorker debut this week. Ms. Barnicoat is the 8th new cartoonist to join the magazine’s stable this year, the 3rd this month, and the 33rd to be brought in since Emma Allen became cartoon editor in May of 2017.

Of note: a double-page “Sketchbook” by Liana Finck.  

The Illustrators (in acknowledgement of their graphic presence per issue, the Spill will, from time-to-time, list the issue’s illustrators):

Philip Montgomery, Tillie Walden, Isabell Seliger, Laura Breiling, Jack Mitchell, Diego Patino, Alec Soth, Amy Lombard, Joost Swarte, Joao Fazenda, Devin Yalken, Luci Gutierrez, Zohar Lazar, Tyler Comrie, (photo courtesy of) Ben Taub), (photo courtesy of) Mohamedou Salahi, Eiko Ojala, Cristiana Couceiro, Ana Galvan, Rune Fisker, John Rogers (photo)/Mike McQuade (illus.), Bendik Kaltenborn

And speaking of illustrators, Christoph Niemann’s redraw of Rea Irvin’s iconic Talk masthead remains in place nearly two years after it was installed. For those who wish to read about the original, go here

Below: Mr. Irvin’s Talk Masthead

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist/Cartoon

Dogs and taxes, by Elisabeth McNair.  Ms. McNair began contributing to The New Yorker in July of 2018.  Link here to her website.

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Bliss & Martin, Cont’d

Noted here in late March, Harry Bliss has been working with a high profile gagwriter.  Today there’s news of a book of cartoons in the works.

 

 

 

 

A Steve Martin & Harry Bliss Collaboration; The Tilley Watch Online, March 17-22, 2019

A Steve Martin & Harry Bliss Collaboration

Slipped onto newyorker.com late in the day yesterday was the above Bonus Daily cartoon.  Sharp-eyed readers will note that the drawing is co-authored: Bliss/Martin.  I asked Harry Bliss if his collaborator was indeed the Steve Martin, and if so, how it came to be that they worked together.  Mr. Bliss responded in an email:

Yes, it is that Steve. Steve was having dinner with Francoise [Francoise Mouly, the New Yorker’s Art Editor]  and others and mentioned he had a couple dog cartoon ideas, also mentioned he was a fan of my work, so Francoise put us together. This was about three weeks ago and since then we have been collaborating daily, sort of creative email back-and-forth ‘dance’ on various cartoon ideas, most of which will either appear in the magazine and in syndication. It’s a total blast.

Mr. Bliss began contributing to The New Yorker in 1998. Link here to his website.

Note: this isn’t the first time Mr. Martin has collaborated  with a New Yorker artist.  He and Roz Chast co-authored the 2007 book,The Alphabet From A to Y With The Bonus Letter Z!

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The Tilley Watch Online, March 18-22, 2019

Contributing to the Daily cartoon this week:  the above-mentioned Harry Bliss with Steve Martin,  Jason Adam Katzenstein, Peter Kuper (twice), Elisabeth McNair, Barry Blitt (a Bonus Daily), and Lila Ash.

Over on Daily Shouts, these were the contributing New Yorker cartoonists: Ellis Rosen (with Karen Chee), Liana Finck, Julia Wertz, Olivia de Recat (with Julia Edelman), and Christine Mi.

To see all of the above, and more link here.