The Tilley Watch; Attempted Bloggery on Buford Tune; An Art Young Retrospective

…The latest issue of The New Yorker (it’s a double, covering June 5th & June 12th) contains a debut cartoon by  Maddy Dai. Here’s her website.

___________________________________________________________________________________

After a bunch of fun posts about the cartoonist, William Von Riegen, Stephen Nadler at Attempted Bloggery has focused on yet another New Yorker cartoonist whose name might not be familiar to many of us: Buford Tune.  Mr. Tune is a member of Ink Spill‘s “One Club” (meaning he had just one cartoon published in The New Yorker in his career, in the issue of October 10, 1936). Mr. Nadler shows us several College Humor drawings by Mr. Tune.   Read all about it here.

 

__________________________________________________________________________

This upcoming retrospective of Art Young’s work (to be published by Fantagraphics) was mentioned here awhile back, but is worth noting again as the pub date approaches (August 1).  And now there’s a cover to show!

Of further interest: the Art Young Gallery in Bethel Connecticut.

Here’s Mr. Young’s entry on the A-Z:

Art Young (above) Born January 14, 1866, Illinois. Died December 29, NYC @ The Hotel Irving. An online biography. 1943. NYer work: 1925 -1933. The Art Young Gallery

 

John Donohue on Drawing Disappearing Eateries; Julia Wertz is Pencilled; The Tilley Watch: The New New Yorker Masthead

From  newyorker.com, May 23, 2017, ““Drawing the Vanishing Restaurants of New York” — this post by John Donohue, who has been tirelessly attempting to draw all the restaurants in New York.

 

_________________________________________________________________________________

Next up on Jane Mattimoe’s Case For Pencils blog is Julia Wertz, whose new book, Tenements, Towers & Trash: An Unconventional, Illustrated History of New York City will be out this coming October. 

A bunch of links to Ms. Wertz’s work, New Yorker and otherwise can be found on the Pencils post.

__________________________________________________________________________________

 

 

 

…Stephen Nadler, who runs Attempted Bloggery, one of my fave New Yorker-related sites, notified me last night that someone had been busy monkeying around with Rea Irvin’s  iconic New Yorker masthead. Now’s a good time to take a look at how the masthead has changed (and when it changed) in the magazine’s 92 years.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Above is how it looked in the very first issue, February 21, 1925, with Of All Things beneath Rea Irvin’s design. The Talk of The Town was elsewhere in the issue, but would soon find a better fit…

 

 

 

 

 

…in the next issue, in fact: February 28, 1925 (above). The above masthead stuck around only half-a-year…

 

 

 

 

 

…until the issue of August 22 1925 (above), when it was obviously redrawn; the typeface changed too. 

 

 

 

 

 

In January 30, 1926 a cleaner, un-boxed masthead appeared, and again redrawn. This is the masthead most of us have known our entire lives.  It has stayed like this, unchanged, excepting the disappearance of the tiny little white dots on Eustace Tilley’s shoulder — they faded away somewhere in time.  A modern addition was a designery horizontal thin line above it in the anniversary issue of February 21, 2000. 

 

 

 

 

 

This brings us up to date. The above redesign first appeared in the issue of May 22, 2017.  Mr. Irvin’s charmingly imperfect scroll-like line has met a white-out brush.  His owl has been re-drawn, his buildings re-drawn too (with the inclusion of One World Trade Center in this new assortment).  Tilley himself has changed just a bit, from the neck up.  The designery horizontal line from 2000 remains (why toss out a perfectly good clean straight line?).  

A fond farewell to Mr. Irvin’s brilliant diamond.  Perhaps we’ll meet again?  

More Tilley: here’s a piece I wrote for newyorker.com back in 2008, “Tilley Over Time”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Event of Note: Edward Sorel & Jules Feiffer in Conversation, Oct. 20th; More Spills: Al Frueh’s Studio and Paul Noth’s Book News

sorel_feifferCartoon gods Edward Sorel & Jules Feiffer will be in conversation on October 20th at the Parkway Central Library in Philadelphia.  Mark your calendar!  Details here.

Mr. Sorel’s latest book, Mary Astor’s Purple Diary: The Great American Sex Scandal of 1936 is due this October while Mr. Feiffer’s latest, Cousin Joseph, is just out. Both are published by Liveright. 9781631490231_300

9781631490651_300

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

_________________________________________________________________________________________________

More Spills Icon EditedPaul Noth has signed up for three books with Bloomsbury.  Writing on Facebook about the news, Mr. Noth said: “They’re my favorite thing I’ve ever done.”

And here’s what Publisher’s Weekly had to say:

 

 The illustrated adventure series features Happy Junior, a bearded 10-year-old who wants to be normal but can’t, thanks to his family, including his father, a brilliant inventor whose screwball products are trumpeted in TV infomercials, his five unusual sisters, and his despotic grandmother who has relegated the whole family to a basement corner of her grand estate. The first book in the series, How to Sell Your Family to the Aliens, will be published in winter 2018…

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________

And from out of left field, this real estate listing for a Greenwich Village townhouse (34 Perry Street) that includes a mention of Al Frueh, who had the first cartoon in the very first issue of The New Yorker.

*New Yorker Minutiae Recollection Award of the year goes to Stephen Nadler, who runs the wonderfully entertaining and informative Attempted Bloggery.  Stephen wrote to me after reading this post and pointed out that this very same studio  was mentioned in that very same inaugural issue under the heading In Our Midst. And here it is:

NYer Frueh

 

 

 

From the realtor’s listing:”The fourth floor is exceptional. In 1924, it was transformed into a loft and artist studio by renowned New Yorker cartoonist Mr. Al Frueh with a raised roof and extraordinary large windows and north facing skylight across the entire frontage.”


Al Frueh's studio

 

 

 

Attempted Bloggery’s 5th Anniversary New Yorker Cartoonist Index

AB indexAttempted Bloggery, one of my favorite New Yorker cartoonist related places to go on the internet, is celebrating its 5th Anniversary with an impressive index of all subjects mentioned on the site.  To the left is a screen grab of just a tiny tiny portion of the Index.  Go to the site for the whole enchilada.

AB is the brainchild of Stephen Nadler, who single handedly runs the very entertaining not to mention exceedingly informative show.  Congratulations Stephen!