Happy 94th George Booth!

One of our most beloved New Yorker cartoonists (and our senior member) turns 94 today. The Spill wishes George Booth a most happy happy day!

Here’s a nice Booth piece broadcast on CBS Sunday Morning back in 2017.

And, here’s his entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

George Booth Born June 28, 1926, Cainesville, MO. New Yorker work: June 14, 1969 – . Key collections: Think Good Thoughts About A Pussycat (Dodd, Mead, 1975), Rehearsal’s Off! (Dodd, Mead, 1976), Omnibooth: The Best of George Booth ( Congdon & Weed, 1984), The Essential George Booth, Compiled and Edited by Lee Lorenz ( Workman, 1998).

— My thanks to Stephen Nadler of Attempted Bloggery for the reminder (via social media) of Mr. Booth’s anniversary

The Swann Cartoon Auction Is Back!; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

The Swann Illustration Auction, postponed because of you-know-what, is now on for July 16th. The catalog isn’t online as of this morning, but you can see what’s up for grabs, including original work by some of the masters: Helen Hokinson, Charles Addams, William Steig, Barbara Shermund, Frank Modell (whose Don’t Trust Anyone Over 10 drawing appears here), Edward Sorel, Lee Lorenz, Charles Martin (C.E.M), Gahan Wilson, George Booth (see below), Richard Taylor, and more.  Go here to see for yourself.

(Work by New Yorker artists begins in earnest in the lot #200 range, but there are New Yorker artist pieces sprinkled elsewhere. For instance, if you go to lot #121 you’ll find a non-New Yorker piece by the great Rea Irvin).

Left: original George Booth cover art (published April 19, 1993) Lot #213

 

— My thanks to Stephen Nadler of Attempted Bloggery for passing along word of the auction.

 

 

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Farley Katz on going back out there.

Mr. Katz has been contributing to The New Yorker since

2007. Visit his website here.

The Wednesday Tilley Watch: Interview Of Interest: Liana Finck; Cuneo At The New York Comics & Picture-Story Symposium; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Interview Of Interest: Liana Finck

From Publishers Weekly, February 25, 2020, “Liana Finck on Pop-up Magazine and Taking Her Cartoons To the Stage”

Ms. Finck began contributing to The New Yorker in 2013. Visit her website here.

 

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John Cuneo At The New York Comics & Picture-Story Symposium

A crowded room last night at the New School for John Cuneo‘s fab fun informative talk as part of Ben Katchor‘s New York Comics & Picture-Story Symposium. Spotted in the crowd, besides, of course, Mr. Katchor: New Yorker cover artist Marcellus Hall, illustrator Joe Ciardiello, illustrator Chris Buzelli, illustrator Katherine Streeter, illustrator Stephen Kroninger, Ad Director Soojin Buzelli, photographer Deborah Feingold, New Yorker cartoonists Bob Eckstein, Robert Leighton, Evan Forsch, Carol Isaacs (aka The Surreal McCoy)*, and Attempted Bloggery‘s Stephen Nadler (who kindly provided the photos above).

*Carol Isaacs’s film The Wolf of Baghdad will be screened tomorrow night in NYC.  Info here.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Politics, by Jon Adams. Mr. Adams has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2017. Visit his website here.

 

Gahan Wilson, Cartoon Great, Needs Our Help; The Weekend Spill: From Frank Modell’s Library: Introduction To Cartooning By Richard Taylor; Article Of Interest: Edward Koren; Barbara Shermund’s Marker; The Tilley Watch, September 23-27, 2019; Fave Photo Of The Weekend: Liza Donnelly & Jason Chatfield In Thurber’s Hometown

The Go Fund Me Campaign For Gahan Wilson

As most of you know, Gahan Wilson, one of the cartoon world’s greats, has been in need of assistance over this past year. A Go Fund Me effort set up by his step-son, Paul Winters is now back up to help with issues related to Gahan’s most recent difficulties. Read more here, and help if you can.

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From Frank Modell’s Library: Introduction To Cartooning By Richard Taylor

Among the signed cartoon books in the Spill‘s library, Frank Modell’s copy of Richard Taylor’s Introduction To Cartooning is a special favorite. It’s the only instructional book in our collection by a New Yorker cartoonist that belonged to a New Yorker cartoonist.

 

The book was published in 1947, the year after Mr. Modell began his long association with The New Yorker (as well as a contributor, he was, in his earliest years there, assistant to art editor James Geraghty).  What you see in Modell’s copy of Taylor’s book is what you see in many a textbook: essential passages underlined, circled, sometimes with arrows pointing out a word or two.  Many of the selections go to the heart of what it takes to be career cartoonist. Mr Modell learned his lessons well: he spent over half a century at The New Yorker, contributing well over a thousand drawings, as well as half a dozen covers.

Here are just a few pages from Taylor’s book with Modell’s marked passages.

And a nice surprise at the very end of the book on the inside cover, Modell added some sketches:

Richard Taylor’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Richard Taylor (self portrait from Meet the Artist) Born in Fort William, Ontario, Sept. 18, 1902. Died in 1970. NYer work: 1935 -1967. Collections: The Better Taylors ( Random House, 1944, and a reprint edition by World Publishing, 1945), Richard Taylor’s Wrong Bag (Simon & Schuster, 1961). Taylor also authored Introduction to Cartooning ( Watson-Guptill, 1947). From Taylor’s introduction: the “book is not intended to be a ‘course in cartooning’…instead, it attempts to outline a plan of study — something to be kept at the elbow to steer by.”

 

Frank Modell’s entry:

Frank Modell Born, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, September 6, 1917. Died, May 27, 2016, Guilford, Connecticut. New Yorker work: 1946–1997. Mr. Modell began his New Yorker career as assistant to the Art Editor, James Geraghty. He soon began contributing his cartoons (and cartoon ideas for others), with his first drawing appearing July 20, 1946. Besides his work for The New Yorker, he was a children’s book author and an actor (he appeared, most notably, in Woody Allen’s 1980 film, Stardust Memories). Key collection: Stop Trying To Cheer Me Up! (Dodd, Mead, 1978).

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Article Of Interest: Edward Koren

From The Manchester Journal, September 27, 2019, “‘Into The Wild’ With A Vermont Cartoonist; Ed Koren’s Drawings Explore The Funny Side Of The Rural-Urban Divide”.

Mr. Koren began contributing to The New Yorker in 1962. Visit his website here.

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Barbara Shermund’s Marker

Stephen Nadler of Attempted Bloggery updates us on the grave marker for the great New Yorker artist Barbara Shermund.  Read here.

Ms. Shermund’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Barbara Shermund (self portrait, above) Born, San Francisco. 1899. Studied at The California School of Fine Arts. Died, 1978, New Jersey. New Yorker work: June 13, 1925 thru September 16, 1944. 8 covers and 599 cartoons. Shermund’s post-New Yorker work was featured in Esquire. (See Liza Donnelly’s book, Funny Ladies — a history of The New Yorker’s women cartoonists — for more on Shermund’s life and work).

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A  end of the week listing of the New Yorker cartoonists who contributed to the magazine’s Daily Cartoon and/or Daily Shouts

The Daily Cartoon: Teresa Burns Parkhurst, Brendan Loper, Lila Ash, Evan Lian, and J.A.K.

Daily Shouts: Liana Finck

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Fave Photo Of the Weekend: Donnelly and Chatfield In Columbus, Ohio

Two New Yorker cartoonists ran into each other in James Thurber‘s Hometown of Columbus, Ohio.

Mr. Chatfield is attending the Cartoon Crossroads Columbus convention and Ms. Donnelly is there attending the AAEC 2019 Annual Convention.

 

 

Fave Photo Of The Day: George Booth, Mort Gerberg, And Sam Gross; A Chitty Shouts; Article Of Interest: Working At Mad Past Its Heyday; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon; Two Collaborative Daily Shouts

Fave Photo Of The Day

Via Sarah Booth’s Instagram account, three long-time New Yorker cartoonists in front of a tattoo parlor,  July 2019.

Left to right: George Booth, Mort Gerberg, and Sam Gross.  Mr. Booth and Mr. Gross began contributing to The New Yorker in 1969, and Mr. Gerberg in 1965.

And…another group photo appears on the drawinglifemovie Instagram account (it’s attached to the George Booth Drawing Life documentary film in progress) .

— My thanks to Attempted Bloggery‘s Stephen Nadler for bringing the photos to my attention.

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A Chitty Shouts

Yesterday’s Daily Shouts from Tom Chitty: “Some Questions You May Be Asked When Applying For Ginger Citizenship”

— Mr. Chitty began contributing to The New Yorker in 2014.  Visit his website here.

 

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Working At MAD Past Its Heyday

From The Comics Journal, July 17, 2019, this excellent piece by Ryan Flanders, “An Unusual Gang Of Idiots: The Joy Of Working At MAD Past Its Heyday”

 

 

 

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Today’s Daily, courtesy of Ellis Rosen: Technology Meets Wilde.

Mr. Rosen began contributing to The New Yorker in 2016.  Visit his website here.

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Two Collaborative Daily Shouts

Olivia de Recat (contributing to The New Yorker since 2017) teamed up with Sarah Vollman for “Gifts To Commemorate Lesser-Know Milestones”

Visit Olivia de Recat’s website here. 

And also today, this duo Daily Shouts by Colin Stokes and Ellis Rosen, “Facial Expressions For Reacting To The New York Times Crossword” 

Mr Stokes is The New Yorker‘s assistant cartoon editor.  He has also contributed written pieces to the magazine.