The Tilley Watch Online, The Week Of December 2-7, 2018; Even More Murals By Steinberg; Event Of Interest: Liana Finck & Bob Eckstein

 New Yorker cartoonists who contributed to the Daily Cartoon this week: Brendan Loper, Farley Katz, Teresa Burns Parkhurst, and Trevor Spaulding.

And those contributing to Daily Shouts: Mimi Pond, Roz Chast, and Amy Kurzweil.

To see all the work above, and more, link here.

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Even More Steinberg Murals

In a Facebook discussion the other day involving murals by Charles Addams and Steinberg,  Joel Smith, who authored Steinberg At The New Yorker (Harry N. Abrams, 2005) commented on Paul Karasik‘s Facebook stream that Steinberg created two incredibly long murals: one 260 ft., and another even longer. I asked Mr. Smith where best we might go online to see the murals.  Here are his suggested links:

“The Americans” for the 1958 World’s Fair in Brussels

The Milan Triennial, 1954 (on the timeline, scroll down to 1954, the Milan Triennial)

— photo above: Steinberg on the far right, wearing hat, stands before his mural in Brussels.

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Event of Interest: Liana Finck & Bob Eckstein

The info appears on the posters, but here it is again: Liana Finck & Bob Eckstein appearing together at Barnes & Noble 86th & Lexington, NYC,  Monday December 10, at 7pm.

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From The Dept. Of A Day Late And A Dollar Short: A Steinberg Panel In Brooklyn

An apology: I somehow completely missed this event that took place last night. Posting it here for the record. (My thanks to my New Yorker colleague Bob Eckstein for alerting me).

At Brooklyn’s Powerhouse Arena, Book Launch: The Labyrinth by Saul Steinberg — Discussion With Liana Finck, Bill Kartalopoulos, Francoise Mouly, and Joel Smith

The panel discussed the reprinting of Steinberg’s 1960 collection, The Labyrinth. Their bios can be found on the Powerhouse page.

 

A Second Look: Steinberg At The New Yorker

In the past week I’ve mentioned two New Yorker cartoon gods, Charles Addams and Edward Koren — here are a few thoughts on another: Saul Steinberg. I admit to not paying enough attention to Joel Smith’s Steinberg At The New Yorker when it came out in 2005. Perhaps, at the time, I was in the early stages of being Steinberged-out.  A traveling exhibit, Illuminations, followed on the heels of this book (I saw, but did not really see the show at the Morgan in Manhattan — it was too crowded; I was jostled every time I paused in front of a piece. I made a second pilgrimage when it traveled to Vassar College, a less crowded venue, far more condusive to examining and enjoying the work (on the back flap of Steinberg At The New Yorker, the author is noted as a curator at Vassar’s Frances Lehman Loeb Art Center, where the exhibit was held). 

I left both exhibits feeling the opposite of how I felt seeing Steinberg’s big solo show at the Whitney in 1978.  In 1978 Steinberg, along with a handful of other New Yorker artists, owned the New Yorker cartoon world. I left the Whitney Steinberg exhibit feeling as if I was coming down from the mountaintop.  An inspiring day (followed by an inspiring intersection with the man himself).

Twenty-five years later, leaving the Vassar exhibit, a large fraction of the awe remained; the mathematical designs, the subject matter, his color pencil work; the way he drew colorful feathers on poultry, the way he used color as pulsating rays emanating from the emergency lights on police cars — all still caused a stir of appreciation.  But…seeing the work hanging on the gallery walls I was too aware of perfection, or my perception of Steinberg’s perfection. The perfection had worn me down.  The designs were too good, the work too beautiful, too creative. No particular piece in the exhibit disappointed, yet the show as a whole disappointed.

This afternoon, while standing in front of the Spill‘s cartoon library wall, I spotted Mr. Smith’s book and took it down. Why not give it another spin around the block. I opened to the back where each and every Steinberg New Yorker cover, from 1945- 2004, is laid out — there are nine to a page. The very first, in 1945 was followed nine years later in 1954.  I hadn’t remembered that — or had never processed it. Nine years between covers…hmmm, hard to believe.

Scanning the covers it dawned on me why I became burned out on the man’s art: I was reminded of a spur of the moment decision years ago while I was walking along 5th Avenue in midtown Manhattan: I ducked into Tiffany’s (for the first and possibly last time) to explore the fleet of display cases filled with so many perfect jewels. Looking now at all of these Steinberg covers, encased in a way, I felt much like I felt following my brief tour of Tiffany’s —  I wanted to be back out in our imperfect world.

Going through the rest of the book was a better time. Seeing familiar covers reproduced full page was a treat. This is how to see them, full size, one cover at a time — as originally experienced when they appeared on the magazine. When the covers were doubled up, facing each other across the gutter, I again found the work too rich to enjoy. Oddly enough I don’t have this problem looking at several Addams covers in a row, such as found in The World Of Charles Addams, or a string of covers by various artists such as you find in The New Yorker 1950-1955 Album, or the  essential Complete Covers From The New Yorker: 1925 – 1989. 

Is Steinberg At The New Yorker an essential anthology? Yes, of course.  Besides seeing so many familiar Steinberg drawings, there were many unfamiliar. But again, I preferred a single scoop –seeing a little of the work at one sitting, rather than sitting down with a banana split (sorry about that). I particularly enjoyed Ian Frazier’s Introduction.

As always with every cartoonist mentioned here on the Spill, I encourage looking at the various anthologies that came out during the artist’s lifetime. Here are some favorite Steinberg anthologies, all easily found online.

For further immersion, don’t forget Deirdre Bair’s hefty Saul Steinberg: A Biography:

 

 

 

 

The Tilley Online Watch, The Week of September 17- 21, 2018; More Spills: A Deep Dive Into The New Yorker Issue Of Sept. 14, 1929… Steinberg Chrysler Building At Auction

The Daily Cartoons were 4/5s in the realm of Trump this week. The contributing cartoonists:  Kim Warp, Jason Chatfield (with Scott Dooley), Mike Twohy, Karl Stevens (not yet a print contributor), and Brendan Loper (who probably appears most regularly on the Daily).

The Daily Shouts contributing New Yorker cartoonists this week: Emily Flake, Liana Flake, and Olivia de Recat.

You can see all the work (and more) here.

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Two favorite Spill blogs to visit!

…A New Yorker State Of Mind: Reading Every Issue Of The New Yorker takes a fascinating deep dive into the issue of September 14, 1929, with a cover by the great Rea Irvin. (also in the post: an appreciated shout-out to the Arno biography). Read here.

And Attempted Bloggery tells us about a beautiful Steinberg piece (dated 1965) up for auction.  I’ve yet to see anyone top Steinberg’s Chrysler Building drawings. Incredible.  Take a look here. 

 

Move Over Addams, Steinberg Did An 89 Foot Long Mural; Dick Buchanan’s Tip Of The Hat To Funny Ladies At The New Yorker Show, and …A First Glimpse of the Exhibit

Steinberg’s 89 Foot Mural

We recently learned of a fourteen foot mural Charles Addams executed (a good Addamsy word!); well here’s a piece in Cincinnati Magazine about an eighty-nine foot Steinberg mural.  Wowzers.

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Dick Buchanan’s Tip Of The Hat To Funny Ladies At The New Yorker

Via Mike Lynch’s site: “From The Dick Buchanan Files: Women Cartoonists: Barbara Shermund, Hilda Terry, Mary Gibson, and Dorothy McKay 1935-1952”

Mr. Buchanan’s latest file finds are in honor of the upcoming Society of Illustrators exhibit, Funny Ladies At The New Yorker: Cartoonists Then and Now

Liza Donnelly, who curated the show, has posted (on Instagram) a preview photo. Nice blow-up of a Helen Hokinson drawing! :