The Weekend Spill: Cartoonists Offer #Cartoonrelief To Those Hit Hardest By Covid-19; The Tilley Watch Online, March 30 – April 3, 2020; Tom Gauld’s Collection Reviewed

_____________________________________

While checking in on a New Yorker cartoonist Slack group a few days ago I noticed a number of my cartoonist colleagues had begun using their art to help those in need during this pandemic. I asked if one of the organizers would explain in detail what they were up to. So here is my New Yorker cartoonist colleague, Amy Kurzweil to tell you about an incredibly worthy effort, #Cartoonrelief:

#Cartoonrelief was born on the New Yorker Cartoonist Slack channel. Navied Mahdavian posted that he’d just bought some photographs from Italian artists raising money for local hospitals, and wanted to know if we cartoonists were interested in selling prints or drawings for a coronavirus cause. I was just about to do something similar on my instagram; a couple times annually I sell prints and originals and give half the proceeds to charity, and this seemed like a moment to up my charitable game. I chose (and often raise money for) Give Directly because their charitable model makes the most sense to me; they give unconditional, direct cash transfers to people living in extreme poverty; they’re highly rated by charity watch orgs because their model means overhead costs are low and decisions about how to spend money are as local as possible. Usually their efforts are global, but right now they have a fund that sends cash to US families hit hardest by COVID-19. 
Other cartoonists jumped on board, and we each made our own choices about what to offer and for how much, given our various constraints at the moment. Avi Steinberg is offering digital portraits, Navied Mahdavian is offering original cartoon drawings, Brendan Loper is offering original cartoon drawings, digital prints, and pet portraits, Sofia Warren is offering originals portraits and original collaborative cartoons, Kendra Allenby is offering signed prints and one-on-one art consultations, Ivan Ehlers is offering prints and custom digital portraits. Neil Dvorak is offering prints, Tom Chitty is drawing robots on horses. Each of our offerings is set at a different price-point, between $25 and $125; people just have to message us the receipt for their donation. I’m offering drawn portraits for $100 and personalized digital cartoon prints for $50. Most people are going for portraits, usually of a loved one: a child they’re quarantining with, a partner they are or aren’t quarantining with, a coworker they’re missing. Although it’s been a lot of work, it’s felt quite meaningful to enter people’s lives momentarily through the act of drawing the people they love. All the responses have been incredibly validating. Here are a few of the portraits I’ve done so far:
And here are some other offerings:
Original Cartoons from Navied:
A collaborative cartoon from Sofia and a donating contributor:
I’ve noticed people have been making much larger donations than I suggest. For example, someone just sent me a receipt for $1000. I think people who can give, want to give, and they appreciate encouragement and validation for doing so. Together we’ve raised $8,000 +… and counting!
If you’d like to join us: Our efforts are unified under the hashtag #cartoonrelief, and any cartoonists can get involved by offering whatever art they can, for a COVID-19 related charitable cause. We’re encouraging of cartoonists and cartoon supporters to propose their own charity or fund they believe is helping with medical or economic relief right now.
If people have any questions about how to get involved, or want to support our efforts, you can reach out to any of the cartoonists mentioned above on Instagram, or email me directly: amykurz@gmail.com 
___________________________________________________________________
A listing of New Yorker artists who contributed to newyorker.com features during the week of March 30 – April 3, 2020.
The Daily Cartoon: Peter Kuper, Shannon Wheeler, Jon Adams, Johnny Dinapoli, Kendra Allenby.
Daily Shouts: Liana Finck, Jason Chatfield (with Ginny Hogan), Avi Steinberg.
…Barry Blitt’s Kvetchbook.
____________________________________________________________
Tom Gauld’s Cartoon Collection Reviewed
Mr. Gauld is a New Yorker cover artist.

 

Thurber Thursday; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon; Yesterday’s Daily Shouts Cartoonist

Thurber Thursday

Of the many Thurber articles in Life magazine, I’ve always been partial to the one appearing in the March 14, 1960 issue (not too long before his death, in November of 1961). It includes a number of pages of great photos (one shown above, and one shown below) as well as a page of Thurber quotes (“Barbed Shafts Of A Veteran Wit”) on various topics, such as World Madness, Writing, and Drawing.  Here’s what he said about Drawing:

“My drawings have been described as pre-intentionalist, meaning they were finished before the ideas for them had occurred to me. I shall not argue the point.”

___________________________________________________________________________________

Today’s Daily Cartoonist:

Shannon Wheeler on the part of the movie we’re in.  Mr. Wheeler began contributing to The New Yorker in 2009.

Visit his website here.

 

________________________________________________________________

Yesterday’s Daily Shouts Cartoonist: Jason Chatfield (with Ginny Hogan): “Wrong Ways To Meditate”

Mr. Chatfield began contributing to The New Yorker in 2017.  Visit his website here.

More Gahan Wilson; A Peter Arno Rarity From The Bloom Vault; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon; Humor Mag Of Interest: American Bystander #12; Today’s Daily Shouts…By Amy Kurzweil; Preview Of Interest on Salon: Shannon Wheeler’s “Mueller Report”

More Gahan Wilson

From 27East.com, October 24, 2019, “Cartoonist Gahan Wilson Is Looking To Find His Way”  — this piece by Annette Hinkle on one of the modern masters of the form.

…and this Chicago Sun-Times column from Neil Steinberg, October 24, 2019, “‘Lucky to be alive’ — morbid cartoonist faces dementia”

_________________________________________________________

A Peter Arno Rarity From The Bloom Vault

The illustrator Tom Bloom is surely one of our cartoon world’s great collectors.  Some years back  I naively thought I’d found most everything New Yorker cartoon-related that could be found. Then Mr. Bloom began sending me scans of items in his collection. It was as if someone had just opened the door to a New Yorker materials filled annex the size of Macy’s.

He’s been kind enough over the years to share some of the more obscure pieces from his collection with the Spill.  Here’s another: a four page promotional brochure for Peter Arno’s first book,Whoops Dearie!, published in 1927 by Simon & Schuster.* If you read my bio of Arno you might remember how important the Whoops Sisters were to the resuscitation of The  New Yorker in its infancy. I’d never seen this brochure until yesterday (and this after nearly 20 years of making it my business to find Arno material).

*While Arno provided the drawings for the book it was actually written by Philip Wylie. Much more on him and his place in The New Yorker‘s early years can be found in the Arno biography.

Here’s Arno’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Peter Arno (Photo source: Look, 1938) Born Curtis Arnoux Peters, Jr., January 8, 1904, New York City. Died February 22, 1968, Port Chester, NY. New Yorker work: 1925 -1968. Key collection: Ladies & Gentlemen (Simon & Schuster, 1951) The Foreword is by Arno.

 

 

_____________________________________________________

Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Barging Republicans, by Ellis Rosen, who has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2016.  Visit his website here.

 

 

_______________________________________________________________

Humor Mag Of Interest: American Bystander #12

American Bystander #12 just arrived at the Spill. Not sure how often I’ve said this, but here goes again: if you love cartoons, especially those we associate with New Yorker artists, you’ll find  bushels-full in the Bystander. Three cheers for Michael Gerber, the Bystander‘s editor and publisher.

Here are the New Yorker contributors found in this latest issue:  Joe Ciardiello (the issue’s cover artist), Edward Sorel, Tom Chitty, P.S. Mueller, Rich Sparks, Lars Kenseth, Lila Ash, Roz Chast, John Cuneo, Mort Gerberg, Barry Blitt, George Booth, Joe Dator, Nick Downes, Bob Eckstein, Emily Flake, David Ostow, Jeremy Nguyen, Sara Lautman, Farley Katz, John Jonik, and Sam Gross.

Link here to subscribe.

_________________________________________________

Today’s Daily Shouts…By Amy Kurzweil

“A Subway Tableau” by Amy Kurzweil, who has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2016. Visit her website here.

 

________________________________________________

Preview Of Interest From Salon: Wheeler’s “Mueller Report”

From Salon, “Exclusive: ‘Mueller Report’ Graphic Novel Sneak Preview From New Yorker Cartoonist Shannon Wheeler”

— and…there’s a Q&A with Mr. Wheeler within the piece.

 

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of September 30, 2019

The Cover: Christoph Niemann returns for the Technology Issue.  Read Francoise Mouly’s Q&A with him about his cover.

The Cartoonists & Cartoons:

Electronically flipping through this new issue (appropriately enough for the Technology Issue) I was happy that the cartoons just kept-a-comin’; there are seventeen of them to be exact. All of them are placed well (i.e., they have plenty of breathing room, and sit well on the page).

Here are random thoughts about some of the cartoons in the new issue…

Joe Dator’s laundromat drawing (page 50): When asked why The New Yorker didn’t run color cartoons*, The New Yorker‘s founder and first editor, Harold Ross reportedly said, “What’s so funny about red?”  What he didn’t say was,“What’s so funny about beet red?”  Mr. Dators’ drawing, incorporating beet red, is hilarious.

I hovered over Victoria Roberts’ campers and bear drawing (p.46), enjoying the drawing itself. We’re used to seeing many of Ms. Roberts drawings set indoors — it’s fun to see her drawing of a tent, and a bear (or a man in a bear suit).

Jason Patterson’s ice cream trucks heading south for the winter  (p. 25) is also fun to linger on. Its concept seems out of the Jack Ziegler school of zany.  Such a good drawing.

Also of note, graphically, and otherwise-ly: Ellie Black’s little red riding hood drawing (p.78)…and Maggie Mull’s Beautiful Mind-ish drawing on page 70; nice to see it stretched out on the page.

Shannon Wheeler’s broccoli opera drawing on page 77.  Its execution is reminiscent of some of William Steig’s middle period work (check out Steig’s 1942 collection, The Lonely Ones).

And of note in a different department: the magazine’s assistant cartoon editor, Colin Stokes’ Shouts & Murmurs piece,“Running With Scissors” (p.33).

The Rea Irvin Talk Masthead Watch: Mr. Irvin’s classic masthead drawing (below) has yet to return.  Hope springs eternal here on The Spill. Read about it here.

___________________________________________________________________________

*There were two color cartoons in Ross’s era, very early on in the magazine’s life; both appeared in the issue of December 12, 1925. A full page by Ralph Barton, and a double page spread by Rea Irvin. Mr. Barton did not use red in his drawing, Mr. Irvin did.

 

 

The Wednesday Watch: Visiting Addams Hometown; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon; Shannon Wheeler’s Next Book; A Liana Finck Daily Shouts

Visiting Addams Hometown

From slashfilm.com, August 14, 2019, “We Visited the Creepy and Kooky Birthplace of the Addams Family”

_______________________________________________

Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

A Statue Of Liberty poem by Peter Kuper, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2011. Visit his website here.

 

_______________________________________________

Shannon Wheeler’s Next Book

Too Much Coffee Man: The Before Years, out March 2020, is the latest from Mr. Wheeler who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2009. About the book, from the publisher, Dark Horse Books:

Featuring decades of strips and comics with new sequential work connecting and commenting on each era, Wheeler analyzes formative periods in his life as a creator. College-era strips early in his cartooning career are mixed with new stories and gag comics to create a narrative arc that leads to Wheeler’s work on Postage Stamp Funnies and Villain House! Fans of Wheeler and the art of cartooning will enjoy this super-caffeinated collection detailing the origin of his most famous creation and his journey from cartooning for free for college papers to making a bit more money at The Onion, and ultimately making just a little bit more at The New Yorker–the apex job for a cartoonist!

Visit Mr. Wheeler’s website here.

_________________________________________________

A Liana Finck Daily Shouts

Another installment of Liana Finck’s “Dear Pepper.”  She began contributing to The New Yorker in 2013. Visit her website here.