From 1943’s Meet The Artist: Steinberg; Article Of Interest: Sempe’s Love For Paris; Release Party For Peter Kuper & Company’s World War 3 Issue #50; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

From 1943’s Meet The Artist: Steinberg

Some years back, hunting through the humor section of a (now closed) used book store in Ellsworth, Maine, I came upon a wonderful catalog, Meet The Artist: An exhibit of self-portraits by living American artists,  published in 1943 for an exhibit at San Francisco’s M.H. de Young Memorial Museum. Among the exhibit’s 150 portraits are 18 by New Yorker contributors. For the next few weeks the Spill will post these 18 self-portraits.

We begin with Saul Steinberg:

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Article Of Interest: Sempe

Here’s an article from a few years back that escaped my attention:  From Bonjour Paris, June 13, 2016, “Sempe, the Celebrated Cartoonist and His Love for Paris”

Mr. Sempe began contributing to The New Yorker in 1978.

— pictured: paperback edition of Sempe’s first collection, Rien N’est Simple (Nothing Is Simple), published 1962.

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Event Of Interest:

This notice of a release party for World War 3  Issue #50:

A release party featuring LIVE presentations by the artists is happening Sunday December 8th at Printed Matter’s New York Chelsea neighborhood shop at 231 11th Ave, (at 26th Street) New York, New York 10001. The event starts at 4pm and runs through 6pm. Many artists will be on hand to sign work and answer questions!

From the publishers:

World War 3 Illustrated is an American comics anthology magazine. Established in 1979 by Peter Kuper, Seth Tobocman, and Christof Kohlhofer. Now in its 40th year, it continues its proud tradition of publishing more new comic book artists each issue than any publication of its type.

Visit the WW3 website here.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Ellis Rosen on… the winter coat. Mr. Ellis began contributing to The New Yorker in 2016. Visit his website here.

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of November 4, 2019

The Cover: Without heading to the Table Of Contents and reading the title for this cover I’m going to guess it’s a comment on city noise. I’ve always felt New Yorker covers should work stand alone, without explanation, or description. This was the practice until Tina Brown’s revamp of the magazine, beginning with the issue of October 5, 1992.

Okay, now to the Table of Contents and the cover’s title: “Noise New York.”

There’s a hint of Steinberg on the cover; the police car beams of flashing lights for instance. Below left, a detail from Steinberg’s March 13, 1978 New Yorker cover, and to the right, a detail from this week’s cover (by Richard McGuire).

 

 

 

 

If you want to read more about Mr. McGuire’s cover, go here.

The Cartoonists:

Some random thoughts on some of the Cartoons & Cartoonists:

So yay! A lot of cartoonists. If we count the two teams (Sofia Warren & J.A.K., and Pia Guerra & Ian Boothby) as one cartoonist per drawing, there are twenty-one contributors.

There’s a newbie: Luke Kruger-Howard, who is the twenty-fourth new member of the magazine’s stable of cartoonists this year and the fiftieth newbie under Emma Allen’s editorship, begun in the Spring of 2017.

There are four bedroom cartoons in the issue: one by Victoria Roberts (page 46), one by the aforementioned Mr. Kruger-Howard (p. 23), one by Will McPhail (p. 36), and one by the aforementioned team of Guerra & Boothby (p. 70). Victoria Roberts’ three little pigs in bed drawing is both funny and touching.  It’s become an instant favorite Roberts cartoon.

Paul Noth has a fine colorful cartoon on page 50.  As mentioned here a number of times, it’s the cartoons that surprise that catch my attention (and often my affection). This is an out-of-left-field drawing that surprises. What more could one ask for.

P.C. Vey specializes in out-of-left-field drawings. His hikers (p. 54) don’t disappoint. I love everything about this drawing, especially the unseen co-hikers’ name (“the Jensons”). Someone ought to frame the original and hang it on a wall.

One can’t see Karl Stevens “Casablanca” drawing (p.39) without recalling others. A quick search on the magazine’s Cartoon Bank turned up five (it’s possible there are more):

Bob Eckstein’s from November 30, 2015

This classic from  Sam Gross, published February 11, 2008

A duo effort by Emily Flake & Rob Kutner, published October 16, 2017 

One by the late great Al Ross, published February 2, 1987.

And this fun one by Julia Suits, published October 30, 2017

 

High on my favorite things to draw are dogs and clouds. It’s only natural then that I’d be partial to a drawing that combines both, such as Amy Hwang’s cartoon on page 31 (her poodles are ever-so-slightly Gahan Wilsonesque).

I can’t see a cloud-based New Yorker drawing — heck, I can’t see clouds — without thinking of Charles Addams’ classic cover of May 19, 1975.

 

Lastly, I appreciate the challenge presented by aerial view drawings such as Sofia Warren & J.A.K’s joint effort on page 28. The last one I recall seeing was this one by David Borchart, published  February 22, 2016.  Then there is this spectacular dizzying cover from Adolph Kronengold, published September 22, 1928.

The Rea Irvin Talk Masthead Watch

Sadly, Mr. Irvin’s iconic Talk masthead drawing (below) remains mothballed. It was replaced by a redraw in 2017 after appearing 92 years.  Read about it here.

 

 

 

Liza Donnelly Draws Halloween; Andy Borowitz On His Work: “It’s almost like the verbal equivalent of a New Yorker cartoon”; Tom Toro in The Paris Review; Advertising Work by New Yorker Cartoonists, Pt. 21: Addams for Sani-Flush; Steinberg: Artiste or Cartoonist?

Liza Donnelly Draws Halloween

From Liza Donnelly, Halloween drawings for CBS This MorningSee them here

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Andy Borowitz On His Work: “It’s almost like the verbal equivalent of a New Yorker cartoon”

From Poynter, October 31, 2017 —“Satirist Andy Borowitz Explains the Fine Art of Lampooning Trump” —  the interview by James Warren includes this quote from Mr. Borowitz describing his work: “It’s almost like the verbal equivalent of a New Yorker Cartoon.”

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Tom Toro in The Paris Review

Tom Toro will be illustrating one sentence at a time for The Paris Review in an eight part series,  The Complete Sentence.

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Advertising Work by New Yorker Cartoonists, Pt. 21: Addams for Sani-Flush

Thanks to the generosity of Warren Bernard, the series of New Yorker cartoonists advertising work continues on. Here are four Sani-Flush ads by the great Charles Addams (it being Halloween you just know that Mr. Addams would turn up here on the Spill).  All these ads are dated 1942.

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Steinberg: Artiste or Cartoonist

From Escapeintolife.com, “Toon Musings: Saul Steinberg / Artiste or Grubby Cartoonist”

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Fave Book Cover (and Book) of the Week: Buzzi & Steinberg; A New Yorker State of Mind Looks at the Issue of August 25th 1928

Fave Book Cover (and Book) of the Week: Buzzi & Steinberg

Liza Donnelly recently traveled to the west coast of Italy  where she was presented with an award from the  Museo della Satira d della Caricatura. She returned home with a box of cartoon books published over there.  Among them was the book above, Aldo Buzzi & Saul Steinberg: Un’ Amicizia Tra Letteratura, Arte E Cibo (Credito Valtellinese, 2015)The book’s cover shows Steinberg at the wheel with Mr. Buzzi in the back seat.  The photo is dated 1960. It’s a terrific little book (7″ x 10″) packed with photos of Steinberg and company, as well as a lot of the master’s drawings, constructions, and illustrated letters. 

On first seeing the book, I couldn’t help but think of this photo of another iconic artist in a car. Those are Bob Dylan’s feet sticking out of the Rolls Royce.

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New Yorker State of Mind/ Reading Every Issue of The New Yorker: the August 25th, 1928 New Yorker

I’m bowled over by the amount of effort put into every New Yorker State of Mind post.   Read it here

Advertising Work by New Yorker Cartoonists, Pt. 17: Sam Cobean

No New Yorker cartoonist milked the humorous possibilities of (mostly female) total nudity like the late Sam Cobean (an example above), but you wouldn’t know it by the ads below. Mr. Cobean’s two collections, Cobean’s Naked Eye, and The Cartoons of Cobean (arranged and selected by Steinberg, with an Introduction by Mr. Cobean’s good friend, Charles Addams, published posthumously) are easily found online (Abebooks is a reliable destination). 

These ads, like every other part of this series (save the Absolut ads) were provided by the Executive Director of SPX, Warren Bernard. My continued thanks to Mr. Bernard for his generosity.

Ad dates:  top row, both 1946. Bottom row, left: 1948. Zippo ad: 1950

 

 

Mr. Cobean’s entry on the Spill’s A-Z

 

Sam Cobean (pictured above. Source: Sam Cobean’s World. See link to site below) Born, December 28, 1913, Gettysburgh, Penn. Died, July 2, 1951, Watkins Glen, New York. New Yorker work: 1944 -1951. Collections: Cobean’s Naked Eye (Harper Bros.,1950), the Cartoons of Cobean (Harper & Bros.,1952). Cobean’s Estate set up a terrific website in his honor. It includes a lengthy biography, with photographs, as well as a detailed listing of all Cobean’s published work. Website: Sam Cobean’s World http://www.samcobean.com/