The Weekend Spill: A 1934 July 4th Moment By Steig; Bliss’s American Bystander Cover; The Tilley Watch Online, The Week Of June 29th-July 3rd, 2020; More Spills: Eckstein’s Beast Piece, A Hoff Mural, and More Henry Martin

William Steig’s 1934 New Yorker cover celebrating the 4th of July  seems to capture the mood of this particular 4th when we have been urged to stay at home, away from gatherings. It was, of course, published during another deeply troubled time in our history.

Here’s William Steig’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

William Steig Born in Brooklyn, NY, Nov. 14, 1907, died in Boston, Mass., Oct. 3, 2003. In a New Yorker career that lasted well over half a century and a publishing history that contains more than a cart load of books, both children’s and otherwise, it’s impossible to sum up Steig’s influence here on Ink Spill. He was among the giants of the New Yorker cartoon world, along with James Thurber, Saul Steinberg, Charles Addams, Helen Hokinson and Peter Arno. Lee Lorenz’s World of William Steig (Artisan, 1998) is an excellent way to begin exploring Steig’s life and work. New Yorker work: 1930 -2003.

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American Bystander‘s Michael Gerber has released the cover of his next issue (#15 for those keeping track). Cover by Harry Bliss. You can order your copy here. If this issue is anything like the previous 14 it’ll be worth the five bucks (Cheap!).

 Harry Bliss began contributing cartoons and covers to The New Yorker  in January of 1998.  A Wealth Of Pigeon: A Cartoon Collection (a collaboration with Steve Martin) will be out this November.

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The Tilley Watch Online, The Week Of June 29th – July 3rd, 2020

An end of the week listing of New Yorker artists who contributed to newyorker.com features

The Daily Cartoon: Madeline Horwath, Peter Kuper, Julia Suits, Sara Lautman, Akeem Roberts.

Daily Shouts: Amy Kurzweil.

…and Barry Blitt’s Kvetchbook.

To see all of the above, and so much more, go here.

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Bob Eckstein, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2007, has begun writing for The Daily Beast. See his first post here.

…Prompted by a post in the Facebook Vintage Panel And Gag Cartoon Group about a Syd Hoff mural, I checked out this piece from The Orange County Register from July 6, 2007.

…More Henry Martin: it’s so great that Henry Martin is listed on this plaque at the old (but not the oldest!) New Yorker offices at 25 West 43rd Street.

 

Wednesday’s Spill: Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon…And Yesterday’s; Two New (Old) Additions To The Spill’s Cartoon Library

Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon…And Yesterday’s

Julia Suits on turning the page.  Ms. Suits began contributing to The New Yorker in 2006.

Yesterday’s Daily cartoonist was Sara Lautman. Ms. Lautman began contributing to the magazine in 2016.

 

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Two New (Old) Additions To The Spill’s Cartoon Library

Just arrived here at Spill headquarters: two books from the 1940s (Madam Chairman, Members and Guests, from 1942, and I Feel Like A Cad, from 1944. I was curious about the Hokinson illustrated book because the title suggested the possibility of a book full of Hokinson drawings (Ms. Hokinson specialized in and became famous for her club lady drawings). Sadly, there are only six, all of them reprinted from The New Yorker. Still, a beautiful cover, and a good addition to the Hokinson illustrated book collection.

Here’s Ms. Hokinson’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Helen Hokinson (above) Born, Illinois,1893; died, Washington, D.C., 1949. New Yorker work: 1925 -1949, with some work published posthumously. All of Hokinson’s collections are wonderful, but here are two favorites. Her first collection: So You’re Going To Buy A Book! (Minton, Balch & Co, 1931) and what was billed as “the final Hokinson collection”: The Hokinson Festival (Dutton & Co., 1956). According to a New Yorker document produced during Harold Ross’s editorship (1925-1951) rating their artists, Ms. Hokinson and Peter Arno occupied a special category unto themselves above all others.

 

The other book was acquired because I’d never seen a collection of cartoons* by (Sgt.) Larry Reynolds, a three time contributor to The New Yorker.  All three of his New Yorker drawings were published before this book came out (and do not appear here). I Feel Like A Cad consists of cartoons about Reynold’s bumbling burglaring cartoon character, Butch, whose exploits, at the time of the book’s publication, had appeared in Colliers Weekly for eight years.

The photo of Mr. Reynolds from the back of his book.

And a self-portrait of Mr. Reynolds that appeared, along with a jokey biography, in the anthology  Collier Collects Its Wits, published in 1941.

For a whole lot more on Mr. Reynolds, visit Allan Holtz’s Strippers Guide.

*Mr. Holtz mentions a book published in 1941, Lines Of Least Resistance:  “collected Reynolds’s cartoons from Collier’s, the Saturday Evening Post, the New Yorker and Elks Magazine.”

It’s apparently a book of poems by the author Laurence McKinney, with Reynolds drawings included as illustrations.

 

The Weekend Spill: Bob Eckstein’s Cartoon Newsletter, “The Bob”; The Tilley Watch Online, April 26 – May 1, 2020; Like Links?

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Bob Eckstein’s Newsletter, “The Bob”

Here’s a fun (and free!) cartoon-centric newsletter. Mr. Eckstein, who has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2007, generously provides more than a good handful of his cartoons, and then some.

Subscribe here to The Bob.

Among Mr. Eckstein’s many pursuits [see below] is editing a series of cartoon collections*, all published by Princeton Architectural Press: The Ultimate Cartoon Book of  Book Cartoons, Everyone’s A Critic: The Ultimate Cartoon Book, and the forthcoming All’s Fair In Love And War: The Ultimate Cartoon Book.

Here’s Bob Eckstein’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Bob Eckstein (photo above courtesy of the artist) Born, New York, NY, Feb. 27 1963. New Yorker work: July 2007 – Author of The History of the Snowman (Simon & Schuster, 2007) and Footnotes From the World’s Greatest Bookstores: True Tales and Lost Moments From Book Buyers, Booksellers, and Book Lovers (Penguin Random House, 2016). New Yorker work: 2007 -. Website: www.bobeckstein.com/

*Full disclosure: my work appears in this series.

Mr. Eckstein’s squirrel drawing above appeared as a Daily Cartoon on newyorker.com, March 27, 2020. 

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An end of the week listing of New Yorker artists who contributed to newyorker.com features, April 26 -May 1, 2020

The Daily Cartoon: Avi Steinberg, David Ostow, Christopher Weyant, Hilary Allison, Sam Marlow

Daily Shouts: Sara Lautman (with Jessica Dellfino), Caitlin Cass, Eugenia Viti

…and Barry Blitt’s Kvetchbook: “Really Enhanced Interrogation”

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Like Links?

If you like links as much as I do you might enjoy The Comics Journal’s weekly round-up compiled by Clark Burscough. There are no New Yorker cartoonists mentioned in this week’s post (sorry if I missed someone; cover artist Chris Ware is mentioned tho), it’s fun to see what’s happening outside the New Yorker cartoon beltway.

 

Peter Kuper Direct Draws Little Donald’s Sneeze; A Case For Pencils Spotlights Hartley Lin’s Tools Of The Trade; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon…And Yesterday’s; Seth’s City; Today’s Daily Shouts Cartoonist; More Spills: Chast, Blitt

Calling his recent New Yorker piece, Little Donald’s Sneeze (After Winsor McCay’s ‘Little Sammy Sneeze’) a “Photoshop fest” Peter Kuper decided to do a sort of take 2 — without Photoshop.  Edward Sorel has referred to working this way as direct drawing.

In an email, Mr. Kuper told the Spill:

“I had to check if my McCay drawing chops were intact so I drew this up. My admiration for McCay went up another 1000% as I noted every detail he included, every costume, a full band and on and on. Unbelievable.”

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Jane Mattimoe’s Case for Pencils Spotlights Hartley Lin

Jane Mattimoe’s latest Case for Pencils cartoonist is Hartley Lin, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2018.  After reading the Lin Case, why not check out the other cartoonists that’ve shared their tools of their trade. Good stuff!

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Avi Steinberg on the ubiquitous sour dough bread. Mr. Steinberg began contributing to The New Yorker in 2012.

…And Yesterday’s: David Ostow, on what is or isn’t significant these days.

Mr. Ostow began contributing to The New Yorker in November of 2018.

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Seth’s City

From Architecture Boston, April 30, 2020, “To Roam His Dominion” — this piece on Seth’s city. Seth (Gregory Gallant) began contributing to The New Yorker in 2002.

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Today’s Daily Shouts Cartoonist

Sara Lautman and Jessica Delfino give us: “How Are You Doing With All Of This?”

Ms. Lautman has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2016. Visit her website here.

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…From The New York Post, May 1, 2020, “Cartoonist Roz Chast is locked down in Connecticut with her anxieties” — this piece includes info on this May 8 virtual event.

…Barry Blitt’s latest Kvetchbook has been posted.

 

 

 

The Weekend Spill: The American Bystander’s Quarantine Calvacade; Film Of Interest: Barsotti: A Cartoonist’s Life; The Tilley Watch Online, April 13-17, 2020

American Bystander’s Cartoon Quarantine Calvacade

Michael Gerber, publisher and driving force behind The American Bystander has begun a Cartoon Quarantine Calvacade. He tells the Spill, he began it as an “outlet” for “both the audience and the contributors.” See it here (and subscribe to the Bystander while you’re there!).

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From a 14 year old Kansas filmmaker, Carter Rostrom, this short (5 minute) film, Barsotti: A Cartoonist’s Life. My thanks to Michael Gerber (of American Bystander fame) for bringing it to my attention.

Here’s Mr. Barsotti’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Charles Barsotti (photo above) Born, San Marcos, Texas, September 28, 1933.  Died, Kansas City, Mo., June 16, 2014. Mr. Barsotti was briefly the cartoon editor of The Saturday Evening Post (from 1968 until its demise in 1969). The New York Times review of his 1981 collection “Kings Don’t Carry Money” led with the following:”Thurber lives, in Kansas City under the name of Charles Barsotti.” His deceptively simple line drawings of pups and kings, and businessmen have been a presence in The New Yorker for over fifty years. It is likely that Mr. Barsotti is the only New Yorker cartoonist to have ever run for Congress (an unsuccessful bid, in 1972, in Kansas). New Yorker work: 1962 – . Key collections: Kings Don’t Carry Money (Dodd, Mead, 1981), and The Essential Charles Barsotti, Compiled and Edited by Lee Lorenz (Workman, 1998).

Link to Ink Spill’s Charles Barsotti appreciation

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The Tilley Watch Online, April 13 -17, 2020

An end of week listing of New Yorker artists who contributed to newyorker.com features.

The Daily Cartoon: Lila Ash, Paul Noth, Jon Adams, Peter Kuper, Brooke Bourgeois.

Daily Shouts: Liana Finck, Olivia de Recat, Sara Lautman, Ward Sutton, Ali Fitzgerald.

…and Blitt’s Kvetchbook: “Duck Doctor Dynasty”