Fave Photo Of The Day: A Dozen New Yorker Cartoonists At Lunch; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon (And Yesterday’s); Today’s Daily Shouts Cartoonist; Roz Chast & Patricia Marx’s 2020 Book Tour Schedule

Fave Photo Of The Day: New Yorker Cartoonists At Lunch

New Yorker cartoonists get together all the time, usually in groups of two or three. Every so often there’s a larger crowd, like today’s gathering of a dozen on Manhattan’s upper east side. They’re pictured above (the year each cartoonist began contributing to the magazine appears beside their name).

Seated, left to right: Warren Miller (1961), Nick Downes (1998), and Bob Eckstein (2007). Standing, left to right: John O’Brien (1987), Mort Gerberg (1965), Sam Gross (1969), Robert Leighton (2002), David Borchart (2007), Danny Shanahan (1988), Roz Chast (1978), Liza Donnelly (1982), and yours truly (1977).

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon:

David Sipress on tonight’s Democratic Presidential debate. Mr. Sipress has been contributing to The New Yorker since 1998. __________________________________

Yesterday’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon:

J.A.K. on Best Picture nominees. Mr. K. has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2014. His latest book is Everything Is An Emergency: An OCD Story in Words & Pictures (HarperCollins).

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Today’s Daily Shouts:

“Introducing Meghan And Harry’s Etsy Shop” by Emily Flake, who began contributing her cartoons to The New Yorker in 2008.

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Roz Chast & Patricia Marx’s 2020 Book Tour Schedule

Roz Chast’s Book Tour Began yesterday. Tonight she’s at The Strand. Her latest book is You Can Only Yell At Me For One Thing At A Time: Rules For Couples, co-authored with Patricia Marx.

(This image found on Stephen Nadler’s Facebook page (he of Attempted Bloggery). Thanks, Mr. N.)

 

Fave Photo Of The Day: Cartoonists At Lunch

Fave Photo Of The Day: Cartoonists At Lunch

Courtesy of cartoonist (and author) Ken Krimstein, here’s a photo taken yesterday in Manhattan of seven New Yorker artists.  Beginning lower left and going clockwise: Robert Leighton, Mort Gerberg, Sam Gross, Warren Miller, Tracey Berglund, Sid Harris, and the aforementioned Mr. Krimstein.

Robert Leighton began contributing to The New Yorker in 2002, Mort Gerberg in 1965, Sam Gross in 1969, Warren Miller in 1959, Tracey Burgland contributes to newyorker.com, Sid Harris began contributing to The New Yorker in 1961, and Ken Krimstein in 2000.

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of December 16, 2019; The New Yorker Cartoon Caption Contest, Now On Instagram Stories; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

A Look At Some Of The Cartoonists & Cartoons In The Latest Issue Of The New Yorker

The Cover: What looks suspiciously like a UPS deliveryman is carrying a fully decorated Christmas tree up the steps of a city brownstone. The deliveryman seems to have something in his mouth. A peach? A corn muffin? Or, possibly an ornament that fell off the tree? I was hoping the answer would be found here, in this short Q&A with Peter De Seves — the cover artist, but alas…

[Update on what’s in the deliveryman’s mouth: A friend of the Spill‘s has pointed out that there’s nothing in the deliveryman’s mouth. The way it appears on my laptop screen it appears there is, but upon very close inspection I can see that the thin line of the mouth forms what appears to be the top of a circle. The circular lines of the shaved-chin fill out a circle suggesting a ball-shape. The beard surrounding the ball-shape framed a circle.  Once I saw it, I couldn”t un-see it (even now).  I think too that the ball shape I’m seeing is nearly identical to the Christmas tree balls hanging close-by. The power of suggestion then, perhaps? Anywho, I stand corrected. My thanks to Attempted Bloggery]

The Cartoonists:

The Cartoons:

…A healthy number of cartoons in The New Yorker’s almost last issue of the year.

…The duo of Pia Guerra and Ian Boothbay have contributed a very Charles Addams(y) drawing. It reminded me, structurally, of this Addams drawing from The New Yorker issue of April 28, 1980:

…The Mike Twohy drawing (on page 27) incorporates a semi-popular cartoonist go-to scenario: the large snake that’s swallowed something. A fairly recent example is this Jason Adam Katzenstein drawing for the issue of May 1, 2017. A sampling of others who’ve visited the big snake that’s swallowed something include Sam Gross, Farley Katz, and Ariel Molvig.

…Two other drawings that caught my eye: Peter Kuper’s couple in bed on page 47, and Joseph Dottini’s party scene on page 74.  As mentioned numerous times on the Monday Tilley Watch, it’s the unexpected drawing (ideally both caption and drawing) that keeps me hovering over a cartoon longer than usual.  Both these caused me to hover. A Spill round of applause for Mr. Kuper’s and Mr. Dottini’s work in this issue.

…A drawing by Ed Steed (it’s on on page 67) has caused me to resurrect a listing I started in 2008 on newyorker.com “Some Favorite Things.”   I wrote by way of introducing the list:

Everyone has favorites: flavors of ice cream, baseball teams, nieces and nephews. I have favorite cartoon elements. Like fingerprints, these elements are unique to a cartoonist’s work.

And then I went on to list a bunch of favorite elements. Here’s a sampling:

Bruce Eric Kaplan’s slanted rooms

P. C. Vey’s stiff-legged people

Jack Ziegler’s kids and dogs, and his men’s clothing

Sam Gross’ cats and mice

Well after seeing this latest drawing by Mr. Steed, I’d like to add:

 Ed Steed’s horses

The Rea Irvin Talk Masthead Watch:  No news isn’t good news. Mr. Irvin’s beautiful masthead, (removed in the Spring of 2017 and replaced by a re-draw) is still gathering dust. For those who miss it, here it is:

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The New Yorker Cartoon Caption Contest, Now On Instagram Stories

The New Yorker‘s cartoon editor, Emma Allen has announced a new cartoon caption contest feature. Read about it here. The feature begins with this week’s contest cartoon.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Avi Steinberg on the risk of making friends during the holidays. Mr. Steinberg began contributing to The New Yorker in 2012.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

James Stevenson Documentary Film “Lost And Found” Draws New Yorker Cartoonists; The Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon (Yesterday’s &Today’s); Meet The Artist (1943): James Thurber; New Yorker Cartoons In Augmented Reality

James Stevenson Documentary Film,”Lost And Found” Draws New Yorker Cartoonists

A special screening of “Stevenson Lost And Found,” a wonderful documentary film about the late great New Yorker artist and writer, attracted  a number of cartoonists last week to the Made In New York Media Center.

Here’s the crowd, post-screening, along with the late Mr. Stevenson’s wife, Josie Merck, (who is also one of the film’s executive producers), along with the film’s director and producer, Sally Williams.

Front row, left to right: Mort Gerberg, Sofia Warren, Jason Adam Katzenstein, Jeremy Nguyen, Hilary Fitzgerald Campbell, Sam Gross, Cerise Zelenetz, unidentified, Josie Merck, Sally Williams, Liza Donnelly.

Back row, left to right:  Jason Chatfield, Heather Loase, Ellis Rosen, Johnny DiNapoli, Kendra Allenby, Bishakh Som, Tim Hamilton, Nick Downes, Andy Dubbin, Robert Leighton, Michael Maslin

And here’s James Stevenson’e entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

James Stevenson Born, NYC, 1929. Died, February 17, 2017, Cos Cob, Connecticut. New Yorker work: March 10, 1956 -. Stevenson interned as an office boy at The New Yorker in the mid 1940s when he began supplying ideas for other New Yorker artists. Nine years later he was hired a full-time idea man, given an office at the magazine and instructed not to tell anyone what he did. He eventually began publishing his own cartoons and covers as well as a ground-breaking Talk of the Town pieces (ground breaking in that the pieces were illustrated). His contributions to the magazine number over 2000. Key collections: Sorry Lady — This Beach is Private! ( MacMillan, 1963), Let’s Boogie ( Dodd, Mead, 1978). Stevenson has long been a children’s book author, with roughly one hundred titles to his credit. He is a frequent contributor to the Op-Ed page of The New York Times, under the heading Lost and Found New York. Stevenson’s recent book, published in 2013, The Life, Loves and Laughs of Frank Modell, is essential.

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The Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon (Yesterday’s & Today’s)

To bag or not to bag, by Lila Ash. Ms. Ash began contributing to The New Yorker in 2018.

Teresa Burns Parkhurst on the work days before Thanksgiving. Ms. Parkhurst began contributing to The New Yorker in 2017.

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Meet The Cartoonist (1943): James Thurber

Another in a series of self portraits of New Yorker artists included in the Meet The Artist catalog published by the M.H. de Young Memorial Museum in 1943

Thurber’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

James Thurber  Born, Columbus, Ohio, December 8, 1894. Died 1961, New York City. New Yorker work: 1927 -1961, with several pieces run posthumously.  According to the New Yorker’s legendary editor, William Shawn, “In the early days, a small company of writers, artists, and editors — E.B. White, James Thurber, Peter Arno, and Katharine White among them — did more to make the magazine what it is than can be measured.”  

Key cartoon collection: The Seal in the Bedroom and Other Predicaments (Harper & Bros., 1932). Key anthology (writings & drawings): The Thurber Carnival (Harper & Row, 1945). There have been a number of Thurber biographies. Burton Bernstein’s Thurber (Dodd, Mead, 1975) and Harrison Kinney’s James Thurber: His Life and Times (Henry Holt & Co., 1995)  are essential. A short bio appears on the Thurber House website: http://www.thurberhouse.org/about-james-thurber/

And for a lot more Thurber, go here.

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New Yorker Cartoons In Augmented Reality

Read all about it here, and see the video! (that’s The New Yorker‘s assistant cartoon editor, Colin Stokes — who wrote the script for the video — being Heimliched in the background by actress, Madeline Wise.

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of November 11, 2019

The Cover: Bruce McCall returns with a cut-away cover. I can’t think of a New Yorker cut-away drawing without thinking of this Charles Addams classic from April 28, 1951 (found on the left, mid-way down the link page). 

The Cartoonists:

Some random thoughts on some of the cartoons in this week’s issue:

…as a P.S. Mueller fan, and as someone who loves cowboy drawings, it was a blast coming upon his drawing on page 75….

…there are two cartoons in the issue as a result of team work: one by Kamraan Haffeez and Al Batt, the other by Corey Pandolf and Craig Baldo…

… work appears by two of the three New Yorker cartoonists who’ve been published in The New Yorker longer than any of the other active contributors*: Edward Koren and George Booth. Edward Koren’s first New Yorker cartoon was published May 26, 1962. Mr. Booth’s first New Yorker drawing was published in the issue of June 14, 1969. *Mort Gerberg is second — his first drawing appeared in April of 1965. It should be noted that Sam Gross is hot on Mr. Booth’s heels — his first New Yorker drawing appeared August 23, 1969, two months after Mr. Booth’s first.

…the way Karen Sneider drew the two characters in her fun cartoon (p.80) vaguely reminds me of Chon Day’s work. Mr. Day’s style seemed to me a way more organized and orderly version of Thurber’s. Mr. Day did wonders with a simple line, and an occasional layer of faint wash.

…really like the pay-off of Amy Hwang’s caption in her drawing (on page 61).

…congrats to all the runners in yesterday’s NYC Marathon, including our very own Liza Donnelly    who ran the big race for the very first time (her “Was Married” drawing appears on page 78).

The Rea Irvin Missing (and Missed) Talk Masthead Watch

The above jewel has been missing from The New Yorker since the Spring of 2017. Read about it here.