The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of July 6, 2020; A Spill Cartoonist List: Fun At First Sight

The Cover Artist: Kadir Nelson returns just two weeks after his stunning cover of June 22nd.

The Cartoonists:

The Cartoons:

A double issue with eighteen cartoons by eighteen cartoonists (with two duo efforts: Bliss & Martin, Guerra & Boothby). There’s also a Sketchpad drawing from J.A.K., and a newbie in the midst: Patrick McKelvie. Mr. McKelvie is the tenth new cartoonist to join The New Yorker’s stable this year and the sixty-third brought in by cartoon editor Emma Allen since she was appointed in the Spring of 2017.

Here are some of the cartoons in this week’s issue that caught my eye: a classic  lighthouse light bulb drawing by great Sam Gross, and then perhaps my favorite Ellis Rosen drawing ever (so far!) — his cave people drawing (much like Mr. Gross’s lighthouse drawing) proves that there is plenty of humor to unearth in these favorite cartoon scenarios. Liana Finck’s tent basement is terrif, as is Amy Hwang’s great ice cream on the beach scene. Enjoyed Roz Chast’s six-squares (the way she uses language here reminds me of Bizarro Superman).  Lars Kenseth’s superhero is so much fun. Repeating myself here, but Mr. Kenseth’s drawings never fail to amuse me upon first sighting — I’m sold before I get to the caption.

Fun At First Sight:

Thinking of that kind of reaction has caused me to think about (and mention) some other New Yorker cartoonists whose styles alone have won me over at first glance. I’m going to list only those who’ve passed into the great beyond so as not to offend anyone still around who I might inadvertently forget to mention.

Each of the following had a “theirs alone” style unlike any other being published in the magazine. That’s a wonderful thing, and difficult to do in a crowded cartoonist universe; each brought something else to the drawing paper as well — sometimes easily defined (see Dean Vietor’s work, for example: I’ve mentioned his thrilling wild energetic drawings before on the Spill), and sometimes not.

So here, in alphabetical order are some (not all!) of those fun at first sight New Yorker artists …Addams, Arno (Peter & Ed), Charles Barsotti, Whitney Darrow, Chon Day, Alan Dunn, Dana Fradon, Helen Hokinson, Nurit Karlin, Anatol Kovarsky, Robert Kraus, Frank Modell, Mary Petty, Price (George & Garrett), Gardner Rea, Donald Reilly, Carl Rose, Al Ross, Charles Saxon, Bernie Schoenbaum, Barbara Shermund, Otto Soglow, Steig, Steinberg, James Stevenson, Richard Taylor, Thurber, Dean Vietor, Robert Weber, Gluyas Williams, Gahan Wilson, and Jack Ziegler.

The Rea Irvin Talk Masthead Watch:

Would love to report that Rea Irvin’s iconic design had returned (it’s been collecting dust since it was replaced by a redraw(!) in the Spring of 2017). But such is not the case. Bah, humbug.

Read about it here.

Here’s what we’re missing:

 

 

 

The Wednesday Watch: Sam Gross Is On Facebook!; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon; A New Yorker State Of Mind Looks At The New Yorker Issue Of April 25, 1931; More Spills: Toro’s New Book; Latest Celeb Caption Contest Video

Sam Gross Is On Facebook!

The one, the only, the fabulous Sam Gross now has a Facebook page.

Mr. Gross’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Sam Gross Born 1933, Bronx, NY. New Yorker work: August 23, 1969 –. Other than his work in The New Yorker, Mr. Gross is probably best known for his work in National Lampoon. He’s edited a large number of collections, including Dogs Dogs Dogs, Cats Cats Cats, Food Food Food: A Feast of Great Cartoons (originally published as All You Can Eat: A Feast of Great Cartoons); Golf Golf Golf, Ho! Ho! Ho!, Movies Movies Movies. Key collections: I Am Blind and My Dog is Dead (Avon, 1978), An Elephant is Soft and Mushy (Avon, 1982)

______________________________________________________________________________

Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Lars Kenseth on being there, sort of.

Mr. Kenseth began contributing to The New Yorker in 2016. Visit his website here.

__________________________________________________________________________

A New Yorker State Of Mind Looks At The New Yorker Issue Of April 25, 1931

As usual with this Spill fave blog, it’s always a kick looking at what was happening in the New Yorkersphere way way way back when

Gotta love the Helen Hokinson cover.

Here’s Ms. Hokinson’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

 

Helen Hokinson  Born, Illinois, 1893; died, Washington, D.C., 1949. New Yorker work: 1925 -1949, with some work published posthumously. All of Hokinson’s collections are wonderful, but here are two favorites. Her first collection: So You’re Going To Buy A Book! (Minton, Balch & Co, 1931) and what was billed as “the final Hokinson collection”: The Hokinson Festival (Dutton & Co., 1956). According to a New Yorker document  produced during Harold Ross’s editorship (1925-1951) rating their artists, Ms. Hokinson and Peter Arno occupied a special category unto themselves above all others.

_______________________________________________________

...Tom Toro‘s first kids book is just out.  Read about it here.  Congrats,  Mr. T!

…the latest celeb New Yorker Caption Contest video has been posted. Several fun/funny captions  by Ellie Kemper & Daniel Radcliffe (the cartoons captioned are by David Borchart, Tom Cheney, Joe Dator, Leo Cullum, Maggie Larson, and Danny Shanahan).

 

 

 

The Latest American Bystander; Jason Chatfield’s Covid-19 Diary; Daily Cartoon & Daily Shouts Cartoonists (Yesterday’s & Today’s)…And Barry Blitt’s Kvetchbook

The latest American Bystander (March 2020) has landed on my desk —  it’s a treat!  Here are The New Yorker cartoonists whose contributions you’ll find in the issue (and in the case of John Cuneo, on the issue’s cover):

George Booth (besides a full-page Booth drawing there’s a lovely photo of Mr. Booth on the very last page), Roz Chast (a two-page spread of her cartoons), Sam Gross (in “Sam’s Spot”, a regular Bystander feature), Peter Kuper, David Ostow, Ali Solomon, Rich Sparks, Cerise Zelenetz, and P.S. Mueller.

A bonus in every issue — I see it as a bonus anyway — are the numerous full page ads for books by cartoonists (no surprise, I’m particularly fond of the books by New Yorker contributors). In this issue we see an ad for Rich Spark’s cartoon collection, Love And Other Weird Things, Ben Katchor’s The Dairy Restaurant, Robert Grossman’s Life On The Moon, Roz Chast’s & Patty Marx’s You Can Only Yell At Me For One Thing At A Time, Peter Kuper’s adaptation of Joseph Conrad’s Heart Of Darkness, and John Donohue’s All The Restaurants In New York.

Go here to the Bystander‘s website to order a copy and/or subscribe.

_______________________________________________________

Jason Chatfield’s Covid-19 Diary

The New Yorker cartoonist Jason Chatfield draws and writes about his recent experience with the “invisible enemy.”  So very glad to hear he and his wife have fully recovered. 

_______________________________________________________________________

Daily Cartoonists & Daily Shouts Cartoonists (Yesterday’s & Today’s)…and Barry Blitt’s Kvetchbook

Today’s Daily cartoonist & cartoon: J.A.K. on who’s speaking. Mr. K. began contributing to The New Yorker in 2014.

Two Daily Shouts Cartoonists Today:

  1. Ali Fitzgerald: “America!: Dr. Fauci Reads A Bedtime Story To Anxious Adults”

2. Emily Flake: “Homeschool Spirit Week!”

Yesterday’s Daily cartoonist:  Emily Flake, who began contributing in 2008. Audio Flake: this from Gil Roth’s Virtual Memories podcast.

Yesterday’s Daily Shouts cartoonist: Zoe Si’s “Substitutions In The Time Of Quarantine, Rated”

…and Barry Blitt’s Kvetchbook: “Our President Concocts A Cure For The Coronavirus”

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of February 10, 2020

The Cover: a photographer. Go here to read a short Q&A with the cover artist, Malika Favre. 

The Cartoonists:

The Cartoons:  Random thoughts on just a few of the dozen drawings in the issue

Two New Yorker Cartoon Gods in this issue: Sam Gross and Edward Koren. Mr. Gross, who has the lead cartoon in the issue — and what a great drawing it is! — has been contributing since 1969.  Mr. Koren has been contributing his fab work, covers and drawings, since 1962.

…the issue’s second drawing — it’s by Emily Bernstein — features a fiery ball heading for Earth (a meteor? Guess it doesn’t matter exactly what it is. What it is for certain is trouble). It’s the second fiery ball about to crash into Earth drawing in the magazine within the past three issues (Jessica Olien had one in the issue of January 27th). Is the fiery ball about to hit Earth the new crash test dummy scenario?  These aren’t the first published by the magazine — my hope is they won’t be the last. Can’t wait to see what colleagues do with it (haven’t tried one yet myself, but the day is young).

…I really like Mike Twohy’s personal info drawing (p. 36). He employs a little used (anymore)  folksinger scenario. I’m always reminded, seeing a folksinger drawing, of the one below by the late, exceptionally great, Charles Saxon. I first saw it in The New Yorker Album Of Drawings 1925-1975  (I started my collection with that Album). The drawing originally appeared as a full page in The New Yorker issue of January 24, 1970.

…Jeremy Nguyen’s drawing (p. 38) deals with an issue  — table wobble — most of us have dealt with at one time or another. A fun intricate well-executed drawing…

…J.A.K.’s octopus on page 42 brought to mind an on-the-spot cartoon fact-checking moment I experienced in front of an auditorium filled with school children about a decade ago. I’d just drawn an octopus on a large pad of paper. The school principal, standing onstage with me, came over and, counting aloud — a teaching moment — made sure I’d drawn all eight arms (I had). Mr. Katzenstein has drawn all eight arms as well (yes, I counted).

The Rea Irvin Missing Talk Masthead Watch

Rea Irvin, The New Yorker‘s art supervisor who gave us the magazine’s inaugural cover featuring Eustace Tilley, designed the above masthead. It sat in place for 92 years before being replaced in 2017 by a re-draw (heavens!). Read about it here. The magazine’s 95th anniversary issue, out next week, would be the perfect occasion to return Mr. Irvin’s iconic design.

 

 

 

 

Fave Photo Of The Day: A Dozen New Yorker Cartoonists At Lunch; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon (And Yesterday’s); Today’s Daily Shouts Cartoonist; Roz Chast & Patricia Marx’s 2020 Book Tour Schedule

Fave Photo Of The Day: New Yorker Cartoonists At Lunch

New Yorker cartoonists get together all the time, usually in groups of two or three. Every so often there’s a larger crowd, like today’s gathering of a dozen on Manhattan’s upper east side. They’re pictured above (the year each cartoonist began contributing to the magazine appears beside their name).

Seated, left to right: Warren Miller (1961), Nick Downes (1998), and Bob Eckstein (2007). Standing, left to right: John O’Brien (1987), Mort Gerberg (1965), Sam Gross (1969), Robert Leighton (2002), David Borchart (2007), Danny Shanahan (1988), Roz Chast (1978), Liza Donnelly (1982), and yours truly (1977).

__________________________________________________________________-

Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon:

David Sipress on tonight’s Democratic Presidential debate. Mr. Sipress has been contributing to The New Yorker since 1998. __________________________________

Yesterday’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon:

J.A.K. on Best Picture nominees. Mr. K. has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2014. His latest book is Everything Is An Emergency: An OCD Story in Words & Pictures (HarperCollins).

_________________________________________________________________________________

Today’s Daily Shouts:

“Introducing Meghan And Harry’s Etsy Shop” by Emily Flake, who began contributing her cartoons to The New Yorker in 2008.

_________________________________________________________________________________

Roz Chast & Patricia Marx’s 2020 Book Tour Schedule

Roz Chast’s Book Tour Began yesterday. Tonight she’s at The Strand. Her latest book is You Can Only Yell At Me For One Thing At A Time: Rules For Couples, co-authored with Patricia Marx.

(This image found on Stephen Nadler’s Facebook page (he of Attempted Bloggery). Thanks, Mr. N.)