The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of May 18, 2020

The Cover: a sign o’ the times graduation piece by Anita Kunz. This is the tenth out the last eleven covers that is coronavirus-related.

The Cartoonists:

The Cartoons:

An even dozen cartoons & cartoonists, with a thirteenth, Ed Steed, as this week’s Spot drawing artist. The newbie in the crowd, Oren Bernstein, is the sixth new New Yorker cartoonist of 2020, and the fifty-ninth new addition to the stable since Emma Allen became cartoon editor in the Spring of 2017.

Some fleeting thoughts on a few of this week’s drawings:

…The aforementioned newbie’s drawing style looks to be in the school of John O’Brien (although this drawing carries a caption; Mr. O’Brien is one of the masters of the captionless cartoon).

…I was hoping to see a horse in Roz Chast’s ranch drawing, but alas! (I’m a fan of Ms. Chast’s horse drawings).

…two drawings, two very different styles, caught my eye: Mitra Farmand’s cats in bags (p.62)… and Liana Finck’s moonbeam in a jar (p. 40).

…Emily Bernstein’s racoon drawing caption is swell & funny.

…the rhythm of the wording in the boxed title of Maddie Dai’s gameboard drawing (p.37) vaguely echoed (for me) the wording in John Held, Jr.’s New Yorker work (with maybe a dash of Glen Baxter tossed in).

…I like seeing the George Boothian rug in Frank Cotham’s cartoon (p. 44). When I began studying Mr. Booth’s work, I noticed how many of his carpets never quite sat completely flat on the floor. I found this touch of reality (just one of many in Mr. Booth’s work) inspirational. Example (in this May 25, 1998 New Yorker drawing):

The Rea Irvin Talk Masthead Watch

The above iconic design by the great Rea Irvin was ditched in the Spring of 2017 in favor a redrawn(!) version. Hopefully, one day, someday, the above will return. Read all about it here.

 

 

 

 

The Weekend Spill: When New Yorker Cartoonists Provide Recording Industry Covers; The Tilley Watch Online, May 4th-8th, 2020; Wired Discontinues Buying Cartoons

When New Yorker Cartoonists Provide Recording Industry Covers

When I spotted a story online about Liana Finck providing the cover art for a new single by Ariana Grande & Justin Bieber (above left) it made me think of a few other New Yorker cartoonist covers over time. Most recently there was Ed Steed’s Grammy winning cover for Father John Misty’s Pure Comedy album (above right).

Then there’s Edward Sorel‘s terrif cover art for the cassette release of Jack And The Beanstalk (read by Monty Python’s Michael Palin!).

In the 1990s Roz Chast provided a truckload of covers for a Mad About series.

In 1955, William Steig provided the album cover art for The Duke’s Men (just one of several Steig covers over the years)

And going back 60 years, this classic by Peter Arno for The Pajama Game:

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A weekend list of New Yorker artists who contributed to newyorker.com features throughout the week of May 4th-8th, 2020.

The Daily Cartoon: Hilary Allison, Avi Steinberg, Teresa Burns Parkhurst, Ellis Rosen, Brooke Bourgeois.

 

…and (Pulitzer Prize winnah!) Barry Blitt’s Kvetchbook

All of the above, and more can be found here.

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Wired Discontinues Buying Cartoons

In a May 5th email to cartoonists, the cartoon editor of Wired told contributors that “Wired will no longer be purchasing cartoons” adding, “Wired will be displaying a daily cartoon until their reservoir runs out.”

You can see Wired‘s cartoons here…while supplies last.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of May 11, 2020: Let Us Now Praise George Booth’s Auto Repair Shop Cartoons

The Cover: The ninth coronavirus-themed cover out of the last ten issues. Here’s a Q&A with cover artist, Christoph Mueller.

From the Dept. of Broken Records: sorry, but do New Yorker covers really need titles? This one would be fine standing all by itself.

The Cartoonists:

Let Us Now Praise George Booth’s Auto Repair Shop Cartoons

In a departure for the Monday Tilley Watch, I’m going to talk about just one of this week’s cartoonists, and his garage-centric drawings. When one thinks of New Yorker car drawings, there are at least two possible candidates that come readily to mind: the late great Joe Mirachi* and the singularly sensational soon-to-be-94 year old George Booth.  As you see in the above list of this week’s contributing cartoonists, Mr. Booth leads off the issue. What a kick to see this cartoon! What fun! The drawing is of a garage mechanic telling a customer, “We found a dangling participle in your carburetor, Professor.”  In Mr. Booth’s fifty-one year history of contributing to The New Yorker, his garage mechanic drawings rank up there with, among others, his guy in the claw-foot bathtub, his cave people and, of course, his dog and cat drawings.

When I think about New Yorker artists who have been with the magazine for some time — Mr. Booth’s first appeared in 1969 — I’m always curious to see when it was that one of their special interests began. With Booth, it didn’t take long at all for his first car mechanic cartoon to appear.  Below is his third New Yorker drawing (it appeared in the issue of March 7, 1970).

I don’t have access to an up-to-the minute accounting of Booth’s New Yorker work, so I’m unable to give an accounting of how many garage mechanic drawings the magazine’s published (if you type in “car” on the magazine’s database in association with George Booth’s name, 65 results are returned. But the database is good only up to February 14, 2005). Here are just a few of Booth’s classic additions to The New Yorker‘s cartoon car canon, beginning with a favorite from January 13, 1973.

 

And from March 25, 1974:

Finally, this beauty from May 27, 1991:

It’s tempting to remark on the detail you see in all of Booth’s repair shop drawings, but heck, detail has been Booth’s middle name throughout his more than eight hundred-and-fifty cartoons published thus far. His love of the scene found inside (and outside) the garage is obvious — all those golden graphic opportunities. We are fortunate Booth finds the elements in and around the shop worthy of pen and ink examination: the mechanics themselves in their well-worn grease-splotched coveralls, and then of course, the puzzled customers and their cars (what great cars!) and the ever-present Booth cats (and/or dogs).

I’ve spent a lot of time waiting in auto repair shops; it’s always a bit of a Boothian experience, looking around, noting the “stuff” — seeing it as Booth sees it. I owe George Booth plenty for his love of capturing the car shop — it clearly inspired my repair shop drawings, and “inspired” is putting it mildly as is clear in the below drawing of mine from The New Yorker issue of December 24, 1984.

Hats and caps off to Booth!

 

* Below: a Joe Mirachi New Yorker car cartoon, published November 24, 1986

 

 

 

 

 

Peter Kuper Direct Draws Little Donald’s Sneeze; A Case For Pencils Spotlights Hartley Lin’s Tools Of The Trade; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon…And Yesterday’s; Seth’s City; Today’s Daily Shouts Cartoonist; More Spills: Chast, Blitt

Calling his recent New Yorker piece, Little Donald’s Sneeze (After Winsor McCay’s ‘Little Sammy Sneeze’) a “Photoshop fest” Peter Kuper decided to do a sort of take 2 — without Photoshop.  Edward Sorel has referred to working this way as direct drawing.

In an email, Mr. Kuper told the Spill:

“I had to check if my McCay drawing chops were intact so I drew this up. My admiration for McCay went up another 1000% as I noted every detail he included, every costume, a full band and on and on. Unbelievable.”

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Jane Mattimoe’s Case for Pencils Spotlights Hartley Lin

Jane Mattimoe’s latest Case for Pencils cartoonist is Hartley Lin, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2018.  After reading the Lin Case, why not check out the other cartoonists that’ve shared their tools of their trade. Good stuff!

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Avi Steinberg on the ubiquitous sour dough bread. Mr. Steinberg began contributing to The New Yorker in 2012.

…And Yesterday’s: David Ostow, on what is or isn’t significant these days.

Mr. Ostow began contributing to The New Yorker in November of 2018.

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Seth’s City

From Architecture Boston, April 30, 2020, “To Roam His Dominion” — this piece on Seth’s city. Seth (Gregory Gallant) began contributing to The New Yorker in 2002.

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Today’s Daily Shouts Cartoonist

Sara Lautman and Jessica Delfino give us: “How Are You Doing With All Of This?”

Ms. Lautman has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2016. Visit her website here.

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…From The New York Post, May 1, 2020, “Cartoonist Roz Chast is locked down in Connecticut with her anxieties” — this piece includes info on this May 8 virtual event.

…Barry Blitt’s latest Kvetchbook has been posted.

 

 

 

Thurber Thursday: Personal History — The Thurber Article That Caused Me To Fly

Thurber Thursday: Personal History — The Thurber Article That Caused Me To Fly

When I ran across the above small article in early 1987, I was in my mid 30s, and had yet to step foot in an airplane. I drove anywhere I needed to go outside of the New York/Metropolitan area.  At the time the furthest south I’d traveled was Washington, D.C., the furthest north, Montreal; the furthest east: Eastport, Maine; the furthest west, Altoona, Pennsylvania (and that was by accident — I got lost taking a friend to State College, Pa).

But the idea of traveling to Ohio by car seemed, well, exhausting, so I agreed to fly to Columbus with fellow New Yorker cartoonist & Thurber fanatic (and soon to be wife), Liza Donnelly.  We booked a room at the Great Southern Hotel, where Thurber’s 92 celebratory drawings were hung, and flew out to Columbus in late February. Did I enjoy the flight? No. I can’t even go on a see-saw without experiencing “issues,” so being in a plane wasn’t fun. But what we found in Columbus was worth the anxiety of being up in the air.

The morning we arrived in Columbus we immediately headed over to The Thurber House. It wasn’t open yet, so Liza and I took pictures of each other on the front steps. We were standing on the porch of the house where the bed fell and the ghost got in… unbelievable.

We later toured the house, using this swell guide:

What can I say?  Being in the house was, for Thurber obsessives, probably comparable (if, say, you’re a Beatlemaniac) to traveling to Abbey Road and walking on the famous crosswalk.

Of our short stay at the Great Southern Hotel (shown left), I don’t remember our room, or even the hotel itself (other than it was enormous).

What I do remember was walking the hallways lined with original Thurber drawings. I can’t remember focusing on any one drawing while there  — the submersion was overwhelming. Luckily, the organizers provided a catalog of all the work shown.

So, yes, the flight was worth it (I would’ve preferred driving back home though). Other than flying home to New York from Columbus, the next time I flew was five years later… back to Columbus for this event at the Thurber House: