The Weekend Spill: Article Of Interest: Mary Gauerke; Cartoons In The Time Of Coronavirus; The Tilley Watch Online, The Week Of March 16-20, 2020

Article Of Interest: Mary Gauerke

From Finger Lake Times, March 21, 2020, “Looking Back — Geneva artist broke barriers” — this piece on Mary Gauerke, who had three drawings published in The New Yorker: November 17, 1956 / April 13, 1963 / October 16, 1965.

 

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Cartoons In The Time Of Coronavirus

From Yahoo.com, March 20, 2020,  “Cartoonists are making the coronavirus the butt of the joke: ‘humor is good in stressful times'”

From The Weekly Humorist, this drawing by the fab Michael Shaw, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 1999:

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A Special Note To My New Yorker Cartoonist Colleagues

If any one of you has a drawing related to this time we are in that has not found a home, the Spill will gladly share it under the Cartoons In The Time Of Coronavirus heading.

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An end of week listing of New Yorker artists contributing to newyorker.com features

The Daily Cartoon: Robert Leighton, Adam Douglas Thompson, Teresa Burns Parkhurst, Emily Bernstein, Emily Flake.

Daily Shouts: Emily Flake.

…and Barry Blitt’s Kvetchbook.

All of the above, and more, can be found here.

Early Release! Next Week’s New Yorker Cover; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon; More Spills…

The third early release New Yorker cover in a month — surely a sign of the times. With the news on overdrive these days I again urge the magazine to consider running an online Daily Cover much as they run a Daily Cartoon and Daily Shouts.

In next week’s cover, Eric Drooker recalls the iconic (c.1930) photo of Grand Central by Hal Morey shown above. Read Francoise Mouly’s brief Q&A with Mr. Drooker here.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Robert Leighton on dating and politics. Mr. Leighton has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2002. Visit his website here.

 

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…From The Believer, March 19, 2020, “News Travels Fast: A Comic” by Ali Solomon. Ms. Solomon began contributing to The New Yorker in November of 2018.

…Get away for awhile with this latest post from A New Yorker State Of Mind, March 18, 2020, “The End Of The World” — a look at The New Yorker issue of March 7, 1931. Good stuff, as always!

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Weighing whether to go out for some essentials today, I was reminded of a New Yorker drawing of mine from the issue of March 14, 2011…

The Wednesday Tilley Watch: Interview Of Interest: Liana Finck; Cuneo At The New York Comics & Picture-Story Symposium; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Interview Of Interest: Liana Finck

From Publishers Weekly, February 25, 2020, “Liana Finck on Pop-up Magazine and Taking Her Cartoons To the Stage”

Ms. Finck began contributing to The New Yorker in 2013. Visit her website here.

 

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John Cuneo At The New York Comics & Picture-Story Symposium

A crowded room last night at the New School for John Cuneo‘s fab fun informative talk as part of Ben Katchor‘s New York Comics & Picture-Story Symposium. Spotted in the crowd, besides, of course, Mr. Katchor: New Yorker cover artist Marcellus Hall, illustrator Joe Ciardiello, illustrator Chris Buzelli, illustrator Katherine Streeter, illustrator Stephen Kroninger, Ad Director Soojin Buzelli, photographer Deborah Feingold, New Yorker cartoonists Bob Eckstein, Robert Leighton, Evan Forsch, Carol Isaacs (aka The Surreal McCoy)*, and Attempted Bloggery‘s Stephen Nadler (who kindly provided the photos above).

*Carol Isaacs’s film The Wolf of Baghdad will be screened tomorrow night in NYC.  Info here.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Politics, by Jon Adams. Mr. Adams has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2017. Visit his website here.

 

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of February 3, 2020; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Daily Shouts Cartoonist

The Cover: a snowy bridge. Read the Q&A with the cover artist here, and see the pretty digital snowflakes fall.

The Cartoonists:

The Cartoons:

In a throw back to earlier Monday Tilley Watches, I’ll take a quick tour through all the cartoons in the issue; a mostly text-driven drive-by of the work.

The first drawing, by David Sipress, references the recent demise of Mr. Peanut (is he really gone, or was it just a dream?). The topic of the late legume was recently covered here.

…Julia Suits’s pirate in cargo shorts on a gangplank is next (cannot see cargo shorts/pants on a New Yorker cartoon character without thinking of the below cargo pants drawing by the late great Leo Cullum — it appeared in The New Yorker,  August 17, 1998:

…The third cartoon (oh, alright: drawing) in the issue belongs to Barbara Smaller, who’s been contributing to the magazine since 1996.  A bedroom, a married couple, and a reasonable question.

…next is a Zach Kanin poker game (assuming it’s poker — I see chips on the table). I really like the three card players Mr. Kanin has drawn. The fellow to the left looks a little like Ernest Borgnine (with a pinch of Broderick Crawford tossed in?):

To me, the guy on the far right resembles Mandy Patinkin.

…next up: Liana Finck on an age-old flooring concern. Nice floating ghost.

…Harry Bliss and one of his collaborators (Steve Martin) address a potential problem for passengers on one of those floating mini-cities sailing the seven seas.

…five pages later: an Emily Flake drawing far far removed from her usual style and cartoon concerns. Think Hindenburg disaster mashed with social media done in a sort of Stuart Leeds style.

…on page 45, a Tersa Burns Parkhurst retirement party. Dunno why but the cartoon reminds me of MAD magazine’s Dave Berg’s “Lighter Side Of…” drawings (that’s a good thing!).

…on page 43 is a drawing by Mick Stevens, one of the most veteran artists in this issue.  He began contributing in December of 1979 (Roz Chast in this issue with a full page color Sketchbook, beats him out by more than a year– her first drawing appeared in June of 1978).  I wonder if the male dancing bird in Mr. Stevens’s drawing was originally in color. Either way (color, or b&w), a fab cartoon.

…David Borchart’s auto rental drawing (page 43) gets a Spill gold star for the use of the word “rassle.” Zeke, the fellow that’s prepared to rassle, is also mighty terrific.

…On page 54 is an Ed Steed drawing that at first glance reminds me of Zach Kanin’s in this same issue, but only because, in both drawings, the viewer is seeing a table front and center and from near precisely the same angle. Instead of card players (as seen in Mr. Kanin’s drawing) we have animated garden utensils and tools. They’re plotting something.

…next up is a Robert Leighton drawing of mountain climbers.  I love how Mr. Leighton has immediately tossed us into a situation that would normally demand the best possible equipment available. You gotta feel for the climber who came unprepared.

…Thoroughly enjoyed  — as usual with Lars Kenseth’s work — his drawing of campers situated down on the ground, and in much nicer weather than Mr. Leighton’s. Look at the care he took in adding the reflection of the moon on the lake.

…next up is a three panel hat x-ray drawing by Liza Donnelly ( who began contributing to The New Yorker in 1982). This drawing answers the oft-asked question of what could possibly occupy all that beanie air space. Love the kitty!

Lastly, Adam Douglas Thompson (the most junior artist in this issue — his first drawing appeared in The New Yorker in the issue of April 8, 2019) gives us a sort of contemporary Chon Day drawing (it’s on page 68). “Sort of” because Mr. Thompson’s line and Mr. Day’s line have different flows.

The Rea Irvin Talk Masthead Watch:

This man (Rea Irvin) is wondering what happened to his beautiful Talk masthead design (shown below). You know — the one that appeared in The New Yorker for 92 years, not the re-draw that’s been around since May of 2017.  Who took the iconic masthead away, and why, and where oh where can it be? Actually, the answer to the first question is easy. Perhaps the last question is easy as well.  It likely resides in a file on a desktop, easily accessed. The question of why is the puzzler. Read more about its disappearance here.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Daily Shouts Cartoonist

The Daily Cartoon: by Brendan Loper, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2016.

…and a Daily Shouts by J. A. K., who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2014.

 

New Yorker Cartoon Calendar Man, Jerry McCanna

Last week at a cartoonists lunch (noted here on the Spill), my colleagues Robert Leighton and John O’Brien brought up the subject of Jerry McCanna and his New Yorker cartoon calendars. When they told me that Jerry had recently passed away I asked Robert and John if they would care to write a piece about him. What follows is Robert and John’s wonderful contribution about a fellow who, in his unique way, expressed his love of New Yorker cartoons on a daily basis for three decades. 

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Many people consider themselves New Yorker cartoon fans, but few have expressed their fandom more enthusiastically or more unflaggingly (less flaggingly?) than Jerry McCanna, who died December 17.

Each year for the past thirty years, McCanna, not a cartoonist but a lover of the form, clipped all the cartoons and assembled a charmingly homemade page-a-day calendar, painstakingly attaching day and date to each cartoon wherever it would fit (and across the least objectionable area when it wouldn’t). Then he copied them, glued them, trimmed them and sent them out, gratis, to family and friends, some of them New Yorker cartoonists whom he met simply by seeking them out and sending them a bit of fan mail.

In his lighthearted correspondence with those cartoonists, who included John O’Brien since 1998 and Robert Leighton since 2004 (but perhaps many others over the years?) he expressed a thirsty curiosity about the workings of the cartoon caption contest, the change in Cartoon Department editorship, and the mystical process by which some cartoons are chosen and others are rejected. He was proud of the small collection of original sketches sent to him as thanks over the years (from the aforementioned, as well as David Sipress, among others), but his friendship came with no ulterior motives. He was a cheerleader of our talents,  never once asking for anything in return.

He’d been sick for a couple of years, but in early December, facing a grim prognosis, he signed off and promised that the new calendar would be finished and sent out by his wife and kids. The 2020 calendar, with the title “Final Edition,” arrived just a few days after the ball dropped and contains a year’s worth of cartoons that he will not get to tear off with the rest of us. He was 70.