The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue of March 23, 2020: No GOAT

The Cover: This week’s cover, by Christoph Niemann is right on the money. The New Yorker‘s art editor, Francoise Mouly, has a Q&A with the artist here.

Historical Note:  this is the first issue of The New Yorker  not to include a Goings On About Town section. A notice appears on this week’s Table of Contents.

A potted history of GOAT (as it’s sometimes affectionately called)

The very first issue of The New Yorker  included a “conscientious calendar of events worth while” called Goings On.  The very first Goings On was just one page, near the back of the book. Below is the heading of that first Goings On.

The Goings On heading survived up through the issue of October 31, 1925. Goings On About Town was used for the very first time in the next issue (November 7, 1925). Goings On About Town was moved to the very front of the magazine in the issue of January 23, 1926.

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And now back to the present…and this week’s issue.

The Cartoonists:

Once again, I’ve posted the entire listing of artists as this week’s Spots are by the fab cover artist, Marcellus Hall.

There is a newbie this week: Matilda Borgstrom, who is the third new cartoonist to enter The New Yorker‘s stable of cartoonists this year, and the fifty-sixth new cartoonist brought in under Emma Allen’s cartoon editorship, begun in the Spring of 2017.

The Cartoons:

There are, as you would expect, a number of cartoons (“Drawings”) this week reflecting directly or indirectly the times we’re in: Roz Chast’s store front sign referencing hand sanitizer and face masks, Frank Cotham’s castle cleaning crew, Liza Donnelly’s kitchen full of fermented food, Emily Flake’s monster coming out of a closet.

The remaining cartoons take us away for awhile– as we’d want them to; the variety includes a mermaid, a couple of cowboys, a typing kitty, stargazers…and more.

The Rea Irvin Talk Masthead Watch: Virus, or no virus, the watch continues. Read about Mr. Irvin’s moth-balled iconic Talk masthead here.

Here’s what we’re no longer seeing:

 

 

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of March 16, 2020

The Cover: Talk about yer timely cover: you might think that the cover on the left, by I. G. Haupt, is this week’s New Yorker cover, but it’s not. It appeared August 31, 1929*, not too long before “Black Monday”; the cover on the right appears this week on the magazine — “The Spring & Style” Issue. I’m reminded of The Rolling Stones song, Dandelion, and its catchy “Blow away dandelion, blow away dandelion.”

*Oddly, the Aug.29, 1929 issue is not included in the magazine’s digital archive available to subscribers. If you go to the archive, and look through the 1929 issues you’ll see there’s a gap between the issue of August 24, 1929 (Helen Hokinson cover) and September 7, 1929 (Sue Williams cover). Luckily, I have a copy, but what if you don’t.

The Cartoonists:

As with the other week, I’m showing the entire list of Artists as the Spots artist is Benoit van Innis who has provided a number of splendid covers over the years.

The Cartoons:

A truly wonderful drawing in this issue by Ed Steed (it’s on page 46), and a very clever idea by Will McPhail on page 38. Other drawings that caught my eye: P.C. Vey’s what’s under the bed cartoon (page 36), Drew Panckeri’s lion in a barber shop (p. 69), and Liana Finck’s fitbit drawing (p.66).

 

The Rea Irvin Talk Masthead Watch:

The above has not been seen in The New Yorker since May of 2017.  Read about it here.

 

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of March 9, 2020

The Cover:  As mentioned last week, this week’s cover, shown above right, by Brian Stauffer, was early released last Friday. Michael Cavna’s Washington Post piece explores like-minded images by various cartoonists.

The Cartoonists:

The Cartoons…and Spots:

I’ve left the entire Drawings and Spots section intact this week as the Spots artist is the great R.O. Blechman — New Yorker cover artist, cartoonist and illustrator. Mr. Blechman’s lovely miniatures sprinkled throughout the issue don’t disappoint. For a lot more Blechman, visit his website.

Of note: two duo contributions this week: Jose Arroyo & tv funnyman Conan O’Brien, as well as tv’s Jason “No demo?” Chatfield & Scott Dooley.

Also of interest, a New Yorker cartoon debut: Andy Singer is the second newbie of 2020, and the 55th new addition to The New Yorker‘s stable of cartoonists since Emma Allen was appointed cartoon editor in the Spring of 2017.

The Rea Irvin Talk Masthead Watch:

Closing in on the two year anniversary of the switcheroo of Rea Irvin’s long running (92 year) fab Talk masthead with a redraw.  Read about it here.

Below: Mr. Irvin’s iconic masthead, now mothballed.

 

 

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of March 2, 2020

The Cover: As mentioned last Friday, Barry Blitt‘s Bloomberg exploding cigar cover (above) was rush-released. Here’s a short piece about the cover’s subject by magazine’s art editor, Francoise Mouly.

The Cartoonists

The Cartoons

A likely too-deep-in-the-weeds observation: I believe (someone please correct me if I’m wrong!) this is the first issue of the magazine in contemporary times composed fully of stable mates whose entry into the stable dates back no further than the early 1990s (Frank Cotham, who began contributing in 1993 is this week’s elder, with 27 years at The New Yorker). On the flip side, you might recall that the last issue of the magazine (the 95th anniversary issue) contained a drawing by Edward Koren, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 1962. A deep (cartoonist) bench remains at The New Yorker.

Here’s the rundown of this week’s cartoonists, in order of their freshman year:

Frank Cotham (1993); William Haefeli (1998); David Sipress (1998); Joe Dator (2006); Julia Suits (2006); Emily Flake (2008); Amy Hwang (2010); Liana Finck (2013); Lars Kenseth (2016); Maggie Larson (2017); Liz Montague (2019).

Two cartoons in the issue that caught my attention both feature non-humans. David Sipress‘s stand-up kitty, and Joe Dator‘s opposum/possum. Also noted: Ed Steed‘s (sort’ve Ben Shahn-esque) full page illustration for Adam Levin’s fiction piece.

The Rea Irvin Talk Masthead Watch: Read about Rea Irvin’s iconic Talk masthead,shown directly below.  Below it is the redrawn version plugged-in Spring of 2017.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Monday Tilley Watch: Rea Irvin & Fillmore Hyde’s The Ritz Carltons; Carol Isaacs’s “Wolf Of Baghdad” World Premiere

Last week’s 95th anniversary issue was a double issue, dated February 17 & 24, as you see below. So  (sigh) no new cartoons to discuss until next Monday.

In the meantime here’s a rarity courtesy of Spill friend, the author, Steve Stoliar.  He recently acquired a copy of The Ritz Carltons, published in 1927, authored by Fillmore Hyde, with illustrations by the one-and-only Rea Irvin. Mr. Stoliar, whose copy is signed by the author and the artist, informs us that:

Fillmore Hyde was The New Yorker’s first literary editor and first writer of “Talk of the Town,” as well as humorous pieces from the mid-20s to the mid-30s. “The Ritz-Carltons” were a posh family that appeared in a series of  New Yorker pieces, before being collected in this book.

And as to graphic content, here’s Mr. Stoliar again:

There are 15 Rea Irvin illustrations in all; some full-page, some smaller or even spot.

Digging a little deeper into Mr. Hyde (in Thomas Kunkel’s fabulous biography of Harold Ross, Genius In Disguise), we learn that it was Fillmore Hyde who brought Katharine Angell (later Katharine White) to Ross’s attention. Ross hired her about six months into The New Yorker‘s first year. From Linda Davis’s terrif biography, Onward and Upward: A Biography of Katharine S. White, this passage of interest:

It was the summer of 1925. A Sneden’s neighbor named Fillmore Hyde, who was working for the newborn New Yorker magazine, told Katharine he thought she would make a good first reader, and he suggested  she go to see the editor, Harold Ross. “Before applying at The New Yorker, I asked the advice of Henry Seidel Canby, then editor of the Saturday Review of Literature. He said that The New Yorker was nothing and that I would make a great mistake to join it because he thought it would never amount to anything. I listened to him and then went back and immediately applied for the job.”

— My thanks to Mr. Stoliar for sharing.

The Spill‘s Rea Irvin entry on the A-Z:

Rea Irvin (pictured above. Self portrait above from Meet the Artist) *Born, San Francisco, 1881; died in the Virgin Islands,1972. Irvin was the cover artist for the New Yorker’s first issue, February 21, 1925. He was the magazine’s first art editor, holding the position from 1925 until 1939 when James Geraghty assumed the title. Irvin became art director and remained in that position until William Shawn succeeded Harold Ross. Irvin’s last original work for the magazine was the magazine’s cover of July 12, 1958. The February 21, 1925 Eustace Tilley cover had been reproduced every year on the magazine’s anniversary until 1994, when R. Crumb’s Tilley-inspired cover appeared. Tilley has since reappeared, with other artists substituting from time-to-time.

And here’s Fillmore Hyde’s New York Times obit, January 27, 1970

Fillmore Hyde, author and editor, who was a former national amateur squash tennis champion, died Sunday at Funchal, Madeira, where he lived. He was 73 years old.

Mr. Hyde was born in New York and graduated in 1915 from Harvard University, where he wrote the music for the Hasty Pudding show. He served in the Army in World War I.

He was an editor of Newsweek from 1930 to 1933, of Today in 1933, and publisher and editor of Revue in 1934. He helped start Cue magazine, and had also been with The New Yorker.

After World War II, he took charge of Pan American Air lines operations in Frankfurt, Germany. Later he was administrative assistant to the dean of the division of general education of New York University and a member of the faculty of the Washington Square Writing Center.

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Carol Isaacs’s Wolf Of Baghdad World Premiere

From Ms. Isaacs:

The Wolf of Baghdad, a graphic memoir about a family’s lost homeland, comes to life panel by panel as a motion comic (animated slideshow) with its own musical soundtrack of traditional Judeo-Arabic and Iraqi music. It will have it’s world premiere at this year’s Sephardi Jewish Film festival in New York. By Carol Isaacs aka cartoonist The Surreal McCoy.
New York Sephardi Jewish Film Festival 2020
Thursday 27th February, 7pm
CJH Auditorium 15 W 16th St
New York, NY 10011

Link here to see the trailer