The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of September 24, 2018

The Cover:

Adriane Tomine returns with a cover steeped in dreams. Read about it here. The cover appears related, in color palette and style, to last week’s cover, by Chris Ware. They even share a large circular object hovering along the right side of the frame  (Mr. Ware’s is a tree, Mr. Tomine’s a logo).

The Cartoons:

Two pieces of good news. There are 18 cartoons in the issue. We haven’t seen this many in an issue since May 14th, when there were 19. Perhaps the surge to 18 is a result of this being the “Entertainment Issue” –or maybe it’s just one of those things.

The other piece of good news is that many of the cartoons — more so than in any issue in recent memory —  are given a lot of breathing room on the page. P.C. Vey’s cartoon is a good example, as is Zach Kanin’s, Seth Fleishman’s, Tom Chitty’s, and Barbara Smaller’s. Most of the other cartoons also seem to occupy more space than has been the case; just a few seem squeezed in.

If the Spill was in the business of handing out blue ribbons like they do over on the Cartoon Companion, one would be pinned on Bruce Eric Kaplan’s drawing (p. 61). Also of note: Lars Kenseth’s log flume ride drawing (p.78).

Update:  Sadly, Rea Irvin’s classic masthead (below) is still in mothballs.  Read about it here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of September 17, 2018

The cover

If you haven’t already seen the school busses on the road, or the signs posted everywhere advising that school is back in session, Chris Ware’s cover is yet another reminder that it’s back to school time.

The cartoons

Here, for the record, are the contributing cartoonists in the issue:

A quick survey of each drawing: Ms. Suits gives us a cactus drawing (are cactus the new crash test dummies — this being the second cactus drawing out of the past three issues); Mr. Dernavich provides us with an end of summer roller coaster drawing with some unintentional(?) graphic trickery concerning the track itself; Ms. McNair’s couple have neighborly dinner date issues; Farley Katz takes us to a sturdy cartoon scenario of parent reading to a child at bedtime; William Haefeli up next with his trademark drawing style and an excellent caption; an Edward Koren drawing — allowed a wonderful space on the page. Very nice all around!; Ben Schwartz plays with Rodin’s The Thinker; Ed Steed plays around with a clown and a banana peel (and it’s in color); Zach Kanin visits a game of spin the bottle (a scenario we rarely see); Frank Cotham allows us a peek into a room full of sweaty frock-coated gentlemen; Sara Lautman takes us up up and away to the sky god’s territory; Joe Dator’s drawing of a symphony hall is splendid; Kim Warp’s trash-in-the-sea drawing arrives with trash-in-the sea much in the news.  And finally, a nod to the advent of Fall baseball with a meeting at the pitcher’s mound courtesy of Tom Toro.

The issue arrives sans Rea Irvin’s classic masthead. Here it is:

I can’t let mid-September slip by without mentioning the issue of September 11, 1925 (cover by the aforementioned Mr. Irvin).  

New Yorker history buffs will recall that the magazine was nearly put to rest in the Spring of its first year of publication. If not for an overheard remark, the New Yorker would’ve been a magazine that lasted less than half a year. Instead of killing the magazine, it was decided to coast through the summer,  putting renewed energy into the issue of September 12th. You can read about the specifics on content here courtesy of A New Yorker State of Mind.

 

 

Mr. Bliss Goes To Washington; Cartoon Companion Rates Latest New Yorker Cartoons; Celebrity Cartoon Captioning Continues; Chatfield & Dooley’s Latest Podcast; Happy 75th, Mr. Crumb

Mr. Bliss Goes To Washington

Harry Bliss will take part in a presentation as well as sign books at this years Library of Congress National Book Festival. Details here.

Mr. Bliss has been contributing covers and cartoons to The New Yorker since 1998.

Visit Mr. Bliss’s website here.

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Cartoon Companion Rates Latest New Yorker Cartoons

If it’s Thursday it’s Cartoon Companion day. The CC‘s “Max” and “Simon” (they’ve chosen not to use their real names) take a look at the very latest cartoons in print. Read it here. 

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Celebrity Cartoon Captioning Continues

From Viewing NYC, August 30, 2018, “Watch Comedian Nick Kroll Caption New Yorker Cartoons On The Spot”

— the newyorker.com series carries on with this enjoyable episode. Good job, Mr. Kroll.

For the record: the drawings shown are (in order of appearance) by: Liam Walsh (chainsaws), Tom Cheney (large poultry), Corey Pandolph (subway cars at bar), Liam Walsh (alley stick ’em up), Will McPhail (ice fishing), Kaamran Hafeez (cowboys), Frank Cotham (invisible man on sofa), Tom Cheney (monster sofa), and David Borchart (beavers).  Perhaps the captioning celebs could identify the artists in coming episodes?

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Chatfield & Dooley’s Latest “Is There Something In This?” Podcast

Listen in as Mr. Chatfield, a New Yorker newbie (his first cartoon appeared in the July 10th, 2017 issue), and Mr. Dooley, according to the official description, “ruminate on New Yorker cartoon ideas over a couple of beers…” Link here.

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Happy 75th, Mr. Crumb

It’s Robert Crumb’s 75th birthday. Mr. Crumb has been contributing on and off to the New Yorker since 1994. His “Elvis Tilley” cover (above) for the magazine published during the Tina Brown years broke the 68 year string of Rea Irvin Eustace Tilley cover anniversary appearances.

 

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue of August 27th, 2018

  Kadir Nelson‘s cover (a tribute to Aretha Franklin) was posted last week.  Not mentioned here at the time (but noted on the New Yorker‘s Table of Contents): the image was inspired by Charles W. White’s Folksinger. 

The new issue’s “Fall Preview” accounts for the abundance of arts ads and illustrations. 

The cartoons:

Now we’re talkin’: sixteen cartoons in this issue vs last week’s nine.  A number of the sixteen cartoons stand out for various reasons. Two of them (I won’t single them out) are beyond me. Not long ago I would’ve emailed Jack Ziegler to explain them to me. It was always comforting when Jack didn’t understand a drawing either. Often he’d respond with a variation of, “I don’t know what the hell it means.”

 Now for some others that stood out (these I understand): Seth Fleishman‘s mirror ball drawing cements his reputation as the New Yorker‘s mirror ball guy. Funny drawing. Also very funny: Joe Dator‘s “hunny” sniffing Pooh airport scenario. And then there’s David Borchart‘s sea-faring koala drawing. Oh my my my. I mentioned Jack Ziegler before. I think Jack would’ve loved these drawings — they’re wonderfully in his ballpark of way-out-there. A Spill round of applause.

A thought here about the placement of every cartoon in the issue: none seemed pressed for space, in need of breathing room. Victoria Roberts doctor’s office drawing (p.69) and Ellis Rosen‘s (p.42) are good examples. The reader can really enjoy the fine drawing going on in these pieces (and in others).

This issue includes the debut New Yorker cartoon by Caitlin Cass. Ms. Cass is the seventeenth new cartoonist brought in since cartoon editor, Emma Allen was appointed in the Spring of 2017. Ms. Cass’s style — mostly the way she handles faces — reminds me of a New Yorker cover artist from the Golden Age: Christina Malman.  Oddly enough, while looking through Ms. Malman’s twenty-four covers for the magazine I came across one (shown below) thematically linked to Ms. Cass’s drawing of children looking at art in a museum.

A final thought before Rea Irvin’s classic missing masthead shows up at the end of this post: I’m wondering if Emma Hunsinger‘s funny caption for her drawing on page 77 would’ve also worked if the word “aren’t” was “are”…and if that’s so — if it’s so how often it happens in cartoon captions that a word completely flipped can still work with the drawing. In this case, substituting “are” for “aren’t” would radically change the intent. Ms. Hunsinger’s use of the word “aren’t” suggests the parents are concerned their child’s behavior is unusual. By using “are” the parents would instead be hopeful that their child’s behavior might make for a viral video.

For the record, here is the list of cartoonists in this issue:

And now, as promised, the missing Irvin masthead.

 — See you next week

 

 

 

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue of August 20, 2018

Seems like a long long time since there was a Monday Tilley Watch (it wasn’t really that long; must’ve been the endless Summer days making the stretch seem more stretched out).  The cover of the new issue is messagey — you can read what the cover artist, R. Kikuo Johnson, had in mind here.

Worth noting there’s gender equality, cartoonist numbers-wise, in this issue.  Also of note, and maybe this was purely expectation on my part of a barrel full of cartoons greeting us this week: there are but nine single panel cartoons in the issue (there’s a full page drawing provided by Roz Chast).  

This will be the last week I note the number of illustrations appearing vs the number of cartoons as it seems to be the norm now that illustrations outnumber cartoons, both in actual number and in space given in the magazine’s pages.  

Also ending this week, I will no longer mention that Rea Irvin’s iconic masthead is missing. I will however, continue to post his masthead (on Mondays) until I’m told by someone with clout to cease. 

One cartoon in this issue has caused me to continue thinking about it longer than I would usually think about a specific cartoon. That’s either a good thing, or a bad thing.  In this case it’s a good thing.  The P.C. Vey drawing (on page 22) of a couple in a kitchen alongside a loose change machine made me think of Charles Addams’ work (always a pleasant diversion). It’s in the Addams mode, yet it’s also very much in the Vey mode. My thinking is that Addams might’ve handled it in some other way — perhaps the machine would’ve been out on the street(?). Perhaps the cup holders would’ve been less economically well-off(?). This splendid drawing has done its job just the way it is, but it also allows for some fun cartoon speculation.  It deserves a round of Spill applause.  

   

And here’s Rea Irvin’s iconic masthead, not for the last time. Read about it here:

Note: for the next week or so the Spill will appear irregularly.  It’ll be back on track by the beginning of September.