The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker October 7, 2019

The Cover: The most recent cover by Barry Blitt has drawn a bit of press.  Here’s Mr. Blitt talking about his latest contribution.

The Cartoonists & Cartoons:

Sharp-eyed Spill visitors might’ve noticed the “Spots” artist is included this week. It’s a special treat to have R.O. Blechman‘s work in the issue. Mr. Blechman is one of the giants of this nutty business. Here’s his entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

R.O. Blechman (photo: Hillsdale, NY, 2017. photo by Elwood Smith). Born, New York, 1930.  New Yorker work:  Mr. Blechman is, among many other editorial and commercial pursuits, a cover artist for The New Yorker, with his first appearing on the issue of April 29, 1974.  His last cover, titled “Eustacia Tilley” appeared on the magazine’s anniversary issue of February 26, 1996. It was inspired by the magazine’s inaugural issue featuring Eustace Tilley. Website: http://www.roblechman.com/

Some random thoughts on just a few of the drawings in this issue:  Two gym-related drawings — one by Carolita Johnson (on page 30), the other by Pat Byrnes (p.70)…Emily Flake is represented twice in the issue: a drawing (p.58) and, on page 17, a two-column Artist’s Sketchpad that looks very much like an excerpt from her upcoming book,That Was Awkward: The Art and Etiquette of the Awkward Hug…Amy Hwang’s drawing (p.54) will likely appeal to those among us who have an affection for sugar — it’s my favorite drawing of the year by Ms. Hwang (her work is included in this upcoming exhibit).

Applause for Julia Suits’ fab nod to Goodnight Moon. A number of cartoonists have played off of  the classic kids book over the years (Harry Bliss, Bruce Eric Kaplan, and James Stevenson among them). The award for most outrageous goes, appropriately enough, to the late very great Jack Ziegler for his New Yorker drawing of November 17, 1997.

The Rea Irvin Talk Masthead Watch: No dice on Mr. Irvin’s classic masthead (below) reappearing this week. Read about it here.

 

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of July 29, 2019; Today’s Daily Cartoonist And Cartoon; A Julia Wertz Daily Shouts; Fave Photo Of The Day

The Cover:  I see destructive tourists at the core of this cover, yet destruction doesn’t come up in Joost Swarte’s interview with The New Yorker‘s art director, Francoise Mouly.  Odd?

The Cartoonists:

The Cartoons:

Almost a theme issue, of sorts:  Amy Hwang (cats), Roz Chast (dogs), Farley Katz (flamingos), Joe Duffy (pigs), Kendra Allenby (deer), Frank Cotham (a snake), Shannon Wheeler (snails), Hilary Fitzgerald Campbell (a rat).

Steering briefly away from the Spill‘s focus, I have to note that Salman Rushdie’s piece in the issue  is titled “The Little King” and the accompanying illustration (by Nico Schweitzer) is a play on Otto Soglow‘s famous character. The illustration seems even closer to the toy Little King than the drawing of the King :

 

 

Applause for Bob Eckstein‘s shuttlecock drawing on page 48, and Ellis Rosen‘s heralded fellow drawing on page 42.

 

From the Department of fun coincidences. Liana Finck’s lifeguard drawing (p. 33) immediately reminded me of an obscure original Lee Lorenz drawing hanging here at Spill headquarters. The Lorenz drawing (its barely legible caption: “Help!”) was not in The New Yorker.  I’ve yet to figure out where it was published, or how old it is.  Mr. Lorenz, visiting here and seeing the drawing, could not recall where it had appeared or its vintage. It appears to be in an earlier Lorenz style (but not the earliest), so we can at least place in an early-to-mid 1960s time frame.

Ms. Finck’s drawing and Mr. Lorenz’s are in some ways opposites of each other. Mr. Lorenz’s beach is overcrowded, while Ms. Finck’s beach is empty.  Ms. Finck’s life guard offers help (if helped); Mr. Lorenz’s life guard is crying out for help. What ties them together, at least for me, is the graphic core of each drawing: the exceptionally tall life guard stand. Fine fun work by both. 

Rea Irvin: Mr. Irvin’s iconic Talk masthead (below) left us in the Spring of 2017 after 92 years of service — it was replaced by a redraw.  Let’s hope the real thing returns before long.  Read about it here.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist And Cartoon

Brendan Loper makes good use of oven mitts. Mr. Loper began contributing to The New Yorker in 2016.

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A Julia Wertz Daily Shouts

“Conversations With Ma: Paint The Toenails And Board-Game Gripes” 

— A series? by Julia Wertz who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2015.

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Fave Photo Of The Day

A crowd of folks who draw got together yesterday in Rhinebeck, New York.  Left to right: myself, Peter Steiner, John Cuneo, R.O. Blechman, Liza Donnelly, Bill Plympton, Danny Shanahan and Elwood Smith.

 

 

 

Happy 89th Gahan Wilson!; A Soglow Scarf On Attempted Bloggery; A Q&A Of Interest: Julia Wertz; Pictures At An Exhibition: Booth, Gross, Harris, Roth, Blechman, & More

A Most Happy Birthday to Gahan Wilson, born on this day in 1930.

Mr. Wilson began contributing to The New Yorker in 1977. Link here to his website.

As well as The New Yorker, Mr. Wilson’s work is closely associated with The National Lampoon and Playboy.

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A Soglow Scarf On Attempted Bloggery

Stephen Nadler’s Attempted Bloggery continues its look at cartoon-covered accessories. Today it’s a circus themed scarf by the one and only Otto Soglow. Mr. Soglow began contributing to The New Yorker in 1925. He is fondly remembered for his creation, The Little King.

Here’s Otto Soglow’s entry on the Spill’s A-Z:

Otto Soglow (pictured above) Born, Yorkville, NY, December 23, 1900. Died in NYC, April 1975. New Yorker work: 1925 -1974.Key collections: Pretty Pictures ( Farrar & Rinehart, 1931) and for fans of Soglow’s Little King; The Little King (Farrar & Rinehart, 1933) and The Little King ( John Martin’s House, Inc., 1945). The latter Little King is an illustrated storybook. Cartoon Monarch / Otto Soglow & The Little King (IDW, 2012) is an excellent compendium.

Above: Soglow’s 1933 collection, The Little King

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A Q&A of Interest: Julia Wertz

Above: Ms. Wertz’s celebrated book.

From Julia Wertz’s website, this fun Q&A. Ms. Wertz began contributing to The New Yorker in 2015.

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Pictures At An Exhibition From Mike Lynch and Jane Mattimoe

L-R: Jane Mattimoe, George Booth, Felipe Galindo, Sidney Harris, and Andrea Arroyo

Jane Mattimoe attended the Mort Gerberg exhibit this past week. She’s posted a bunch of photos on her site. You can see them here.

Mike Lynch also attended and posted a number of pix on his website. Here’s one I particularly like:

Two titans of the cartoon world: Arnold Roth and R.O. Blechman, with their spouses, Caroline and Moisha

The Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue of February 11, 2019; Today’s Daily Cartoon

The Cover: This week’s New Yorker cover is by Pascal Campion, his second cover for the magazine — his second moody metropolis scene. Read about it here. I wonder if we’ll see a moody mid-western, western, northeastern or southern scenario anytime soon.

The Cartoonists:

The Cartoons: Several nice surprises this week. The first was running into Sam Gross’s lead-in cartoon (his work has been appearing in the magazine for forty-nine years). There are certain cartoonists whose style alone gets the laugh meter buzzing. Mr. Gross is one of those cartoonists. The other surprise: R.O. Blechman’s “spot” drawings. Mr. Blechman’s wonderful drawings and covers have appeared in the magazine for forty-five years.

A third nice thing to see in this issue: the number of cartoons. Bumped up from the usual dozen or so to a healthy eighteen. They just keep on a-comin as you flip through the magazine (as do the illustrations).

If I have one little dark cloud to drag over this sunny moment it’s another plea for some of the work to be run larger (true, some cartoons run large, should be smaller). A number in this issue are, to my eyes, sized just right (a few for instances: Tom Cheney’s on page 54, and Jon Adams on page 52). Perfectly sized is Seth Fleishman’s terrific drawing on page 39. But others seem wedged into their corners; Roz Chast’s intricate Candy Land For Adults (page 32) and David Sipress’s off the beaten track restaurant (page 25) would benefit from more space. Really all I’m campaigning for is a graphic invitation for readers to fully appreciate the work. The work of the late George Price is a good example of how a cartoonist’s world can take us in for some detached momentary fun-time. Mr. Price’s drawings were usually allowed a lot of breathing room on the page. One paused to inspect the work, to enjoy all the “stuff” Price gave us. Imagine one of his drawings run in a little box on the corner of a page.

A few favorite drawings, or elements of drawings in this issue: Joe Dator’s monkey (page 40); Paul Noth’s drawing (page 60) — a great addition to the New Yorker‘s doctor canon; P.C. Vey’s theater drawing; Maddie Dai’s drawing of a sculptor and friend, as well as the caption; Frank Cotham’s perfect caption for his drawing (page 36). All fine, inspiring moments.

Next-to-Lastly, a mention of the newest cartoonist on the block: Ellie Black, the third newbie this year and the twenty-seventh new cartoonist brought in since Emma Allen became the magazine’s cartoon editor in May of 2017. A good debut, with a welcome unexpected play on the well-worn hands touching moment we’ve seen in movies and books.

And lastly, let us not forget the great work of Rea Irvin, especially his mothballed masthead design. Here it is:

Speaking of Mr. Irvin, I spoke too soon last week about the New Yorker‘s anniversary issue appearing this week. Had I bothered to consult the fine print publishing info found near the end of each issue I would’ve seen that next week’s magazine (a double issue: February 18 & 25) is the 94th anniversary issue.

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Today’s Daily Cartoon

Today’s Daily cartoon, a post-Super Bowl tie-in, is by Farley Katz, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2007. Link to his website here.

Auction Of Interest: Peter Arno, William Steig, Arnie Levin, Charles Addams, Frank Modell, Charles Saxon, And More

Thanks to Stephen Nadler of Attempted Bloggery for alerting the Spill to the new Swann catalog, which contains an abundance of New Yorker art.  A highlight, shown above, is Peter Arno’s New Yorker cover of April 4, 1964. Here’s what it looked like as the published cover:

Other New Yorker work offered by Charles Addams, William Steig, Charles Barsotti, Arnie Levin, Richard Decker, Frank Modell, James Daugherty (aka “Jimmie-the-Ink”), Heidi Goennel, Garrett Price, Mischa Richter, Charles Saxon, George Price, Theodore Haupt, Arthur Getz, R.O. Blechman and the King of the Gagwriters, Richard McCallister. Empty the piggy bank!