Book Launch Reminder: Wertz’s Tenements,Towers & Trash; Books Of Interest: R. Crumb: From the Underground to Genesis; Cartoon County: My Father and His Friends in the Golden Age of Make-Believe

Book Launch Reminder: Wertz’s Tenements, Towers & Trash

A book launch for Ms. Wertz’s book will be held October 5th at the Powerhouse Arena. All the info here! Joining Ms. Wertz will be two New Yorker colleagues, Emily Flake and Liana Finck

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 R. Crumb: From the Underground to Genesis

Due December 26th, 2017 from IDW Publishing, R. Crumb: From the Underground to Genesis.  

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Cartoon County

From F,S & G in November, Cartoon County. An excerpt of this book recently appeared in Vanity Fair.  The author, Mr. Murphy, is the editor at large at that publication.

From Publisher’s Weekly: “Immensely evocative . . . [Murphy] writes with a personable mix of affection and realism that offers a vivid sense of what it was like to . . . be a working cartoonist in the decades following WWII.”

 

Exhibit of Interest: R. Crumb’s Early Work; More Spills with Liza Donnelly, Victoria Roberts, Michael Crawford, and a Piece on newyorker.com’s Videos

zap_1-210x300The Fantagraphics Bookstore & Gallery will exhibit “R. Crumb: Early Works, 1965 – 1967″ Details here.

Mr. Crumb’s New Yorker debut was a cover for the 1994 anniversary issue.  His cover, titled “Elvis Tilley” marked the first break in the magazine’s sixty-eight year old tradition of running Rea Irvin’s classic Eustace Tilley  on the cover of the anniversary issue. (For more on Tilley’s anniversary appearances go here to a piece I wrote for newyorker.com back in 2008)

Elvis Tilley

 

 

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More Spills Icon Editedhere’s a short video for the blog,  Skillshare featuring Liza Donnelly. A link to a longer interview with her can be found on the site. LD Skillshare

 

 

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Link here to this interview of interest:  “New Yorker Cartoonist Victoria Roberts: Write at Home in San Miguel”

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…Here’s an article from Nieman Lab, “Video is giving The New Yorker a way to reach new readers without turning off existing diehards” (the newyorker.com‘s Cartoon Lounge is briefly mentioned).

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Finally, this short piece from a Hudson Valley (NY) publication, Chronogram, “Parting Shot: Michael Crawford”

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Book of Interest: The Realist Cartoons; Feiffer at 86; Mick Stevens Talks Batch

RealistIt’s going to be awhile before this appears in bookstores (April of 2016) but the wait will be worth it.  Here’s a description  from the publisher (Fantagraphics):

The Realist was a legendary satirical periodical that ran from 1958 to 2001 and published some of the most incendiary cartoons that ever appeared in an American magazine. The Realist Cartoons collects, for the first time, the best, the wittiest, and the most provocative drawings that appeared in its pages, including work by R. Crumb, Art Spiegelman, S. Clay Wilson, Jay Lynch, Trina Robbins, Mort Gerberg, Jay Kinney, Richard Guindon, Nicole Hollander, Skip Williamson, and many others.

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MN-AJ408_FEIFFE_J_20150615154339 Here’s a really nice interview with Jules Feiffer from The Wall Street Journal (by way of Bado’s blog).

 

 

 

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The BatchIf you happen to be in the vicinity of St. Augustine, Florida on June 30th, you’re in luck, because Mick Stevens,  one of the funniest New Yorker cartoonists on the planet will be showing his work and speaking about “The Batch” [a collective term for the drawings a cartoonist submits weekly to the magazine. Link here to see my complete New Yorker cartoonists glossary]

Mick posted the following on Face Book this morning:

I’ll be speaking briefly (20 Slides, 20 seconds per slide) at Pecha Kucha nite here in St. Aug. on June 30. Details.

It’s Not All About New Yorker Cartoons…But Mostly It Is

 

 

 

It makes sense that the shelves of the cartoon library of two New Yorker cartoonists would be sagging under the weight of New Yorker cartoon collections. But a  large fragment of what makes up our cartoon library has little to do with New Yorker cartoons and a lot to do with work that initially inspired us, and with newer work that continues to inspire.

 

Pictured above is a condensed collection — a mini-library — of non-New Yorker books that I keep near my office (my wife has her own mini-library in her office). There’re a lot of books devoted to Superman and Batman, and that’s exactly how it should be.  Those were my earliest influences along with a few Sunday Funnies, such as Blondie and Dick Tracy.  And then, of course, there was Mad (I’m especially fond of Mad Cover To Cover).

 

The two Smithsonian collections pictured (Comic-Book Comics and Newspaper Comics) are essential cartoon library books.  The R. Crumb books are there because his work acted as bridge  connecting the years I devoted to comic books with my earliest days of discovering New Yorker cartoonists (Crumb himself began contributing to The New Yorker in the 1990s and then stopped contributing due to…well, let’s leave that for another post).

There’re a number of books devoted to graphic novels.  I had the graphic novel fever for a while.   The Marx Brothers Scrapbook in the photo sits next to Monty Python Speaks!   Neither are cartoon collections, but it’s fitting that they are represented.  Their work was and is as graphically inspiring as any of the others on the shelves.

A handful of  New Yorker contributors books are part of this mini-library (Crumb, for instance, as well as Edward Sorel, Ward Sutton, Daniel Clowes,  and Seth), but these books are from their other fields of interest.

The eagle-eyed will spot an actual New Yorker collection.  It makes no sense that it’s there and I can only think it has to do with its origin —  it’s a French collection.