The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of December 16, 2019; The New Yorker Cartoon Caption Contest, Now On Instagram Stories; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

A Look At Some Of The Cartoonists & Cartoons In The Latest Issue Of The New Yorker

The Cover: What looks suspiciously like a UPS deliveryman is carrying a fully decorated Christmas tree up the steps of a city brownstone. The deliveryman seems to have something in his mouth. A peach? A corn muffin? Or, possibly an ornament that fell off the tree? I was hoping the answer would be found here, in this short Q&A with Peter De Seves — the cover artist, but alas…

[Update on what’s in the deliveryman’s mouth: A friend of the Spill‘s has pointed out that there’s nothing in the deliveryman’s mouth. The way it appears on my laptop screen it appears there is, but upon very close inspection I can see that the thin line of the mouth forms what appears to be the top of a circle. The circular lines of the shaved-chin fill out a circle suggesting a ball-shape. The beard surrounding the ball-shape framed a circle.  Once I saw it, I couldn”t un-see it (even now).  I think too that the ball shape I’m seeing is nearly identical to the Christmas tree balls hanging close-by. The power of suggestion then, perhaps? Anywho, I stand corrected. My thanks to Attempted Bloggery]

The Cartoonists:

The Cartoons:

…A healthy number of cartoons in The New Yorker’s almost last issue of the year.

…The duo of Pia Guerra and Ian Boothbay have contributed a very Charles Addams(y) drawing. It reminded me, structurally, of this Addams drawing from The New Yorker issue of April 28, 1980:

…The Mike Twohy drawing (on page 27) incorporates a semi-popular cartoonist go-to scenario: the large snake that’s swallowed something. A fairly recent example is this Jason Adam Katzenstein drawing for the issue of May 1, 2017. A sampling of others who’ve visited the big snake that’s swallowed something include Sam Gross, Farley Katz, and Ariel Molvig.

…Two other drawings that caught my eye: Peter Kuper’s couple in bed on page 47, and Joseph Dottini’s party scene on page 74.  As mentioned numerous times on the Monday Tilley Watch, it’s the unexpected drawing (ideally both caption and drawing) that keeps me hovering over a cartoon longer than usual.  Both these caused me to hover. A Spill round of applause for Mr. Kuper’s and Mr. Dottini’s work in this issue.

…A drawing by Ed Steed (it’s on on page 67) has caused me to resurrect a listing I started in 2008 on newyorker.com “Some Favorite Things.”   I wrote by way of introducing the list:

Everyone has favorites: flavors of ice cream, baseball teams, nieces and nephews. I have favorite cartoon elements. Like fingerprints, these elements are unique to a cartoonist’s work.

And then I went on to list a bunch of favorite elements. Here’s a sampling:

Bruce Eric Kaplan’s slanted rooms

P. C. Vey’s stiff-legged people

Jack Ziegler’s kids and dogs, and his men’s clothing

Sam Gross’ cats and mice

Well after seeing this latest drawing by Mr. Steed, I’d like to add:

 Ed Steed’s horses

The Rea Irvin Talk Masthead Watch:  No news isn’t good news. Mr. Irvin’s beautiful masthead, (removed in the Spring of 2017 and replaced by a re-draw) is still gathering dust. For those who miss it, here it is:

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The New Yorker Cartoon Caption Contest, Now On Instagram Stories

The New Yorker‘s cartoon editor, Emma Allen has announced a new cartoon caption contest feature. Read about it here. The feature begins with this week’s contest cartoon.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Avi Steinberg on the risk of making friends during the holidays. Mr. Steinberg began contributing to The New Yorker in 2012.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of November 4, 2019

The Cover: Without heading to the Table Of Contents and reading the title for this cover I’m going to guess it’s a comment on city noise. I’ve always felt New Yorker covers should work stand alone, without explanation, or description. This was the practice until Tina Brown’s revamp of the magazine, beginning with the issue of October 5, 1992.

Okay, now to the Table of Contents and the cover’s title: “Noise New York.”

There’s a hint of Steinberg on the cover; the police car beams of flashing lights for instance. Below left, a detail from Steinberg’s March 13, 1978 New Yorker cover, and to the right, a detail from this week’s cover (by Richard McGuire).

 

 

 

 

If you want to read more about Mr. McGuire’s cover, go here.

The Cartoonists:

Some random thoughts on some of the Cartoons & Cartoonists:

So yay! A lot of cartoonists. If we count the two teams (Sofia Warren & J.A.K., and Pia Guerra & Ian Boothby) as one cartoonist per drawing, there are twenty-one contributors.

There’s a newbie: Luke Kruger-Howard, who is the twenty-fourth new member of the magazine’s stable of cartoonists this year and the fiftieth newbie under Emma Allen’s editorship, begun in the Spring of 2017.

There are four bedroom cartoons in the issue: one by Victoria Roberts (page 46), one by the aforementioned Mr. Kruger-Howard (p. 23), one by Will McPhail (p. 36), and one by the aforementioned team of Guerra & Boothby (p. 70). Victoria Roberts’ three little pigs in bed drawing is both funny and touching.  It’s become an instant favorite Roberts cartoon.

Paul Noth has a fine colorful cartoon on page 50.  As mentioned here a number of times, it’s the cartoons that surprise that catch my attention (and often my affection). This is an out-of-left-field drawing that surprises. What more could one ask for.

P.C. Vey specializes in out-of-left-field drawings. His hikers (p. 54) don’t disappoint. I love everything about this drawing, especially the unseen co-hikers’ name (“the Jensons”). Someone ought to frame the original and hang it on a wall.

One can’t see Karl Stevens “Casablanca” drawing (p.39) without recalling others. A quick search on the magazine’s Cartoon Bank turned up five (it’s possible there are more):

Bob Eckstein’s from November 30, 2015

This classic from  Sam Gross, published February 11, 2008

A duo effort by Emily Flake & Rob Kutner, published October 16, 2017 

One by the late great Al Ross, published February 2, 1987.

And this fun one by Julia Suits, published October 30, 2017

 

High on my favorite things to draw are dogs and clouds. It’s only natural then that I’d be partial to a drawing that combines both, such as Amy Hwang’s cartoon on page 31 (her poodles are ever-so-slightly Gahan Wilsonesque).

I can’t see a cloud-based New Yorker drawing — heck, I can’t see clouds — without thinking of Charles Addams’ classic cover of May 19, 1975.

 

Lastly, I appreciate the challenge presented by aerial view drawings such as Sofia Warren & J.A.K’s joint effort on page 28. The last one I recall seeing was this one by David Borchart, published  February 22, 2016.  Then there is this spectacular dizzying cover from Adolph Kronengold, published September 22, 1928.

The Rea Irvin Talk Masthead Watch

Sadly, Mr. Irvin’s iconic Talk masthead drawing (below) remains mothballed. It was replaced by a redraw in 2017 after appearing 92 years.  Read about it here.

 

 

 

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue of September 9, 2019

The Cover:

It’s the Style Issue this week….thus the bountiful polka dots on Malika Favre’s eighth cover for the magazine. A Q&A with the artist here. If you link to the Q&A you’ll see the polka dot dress swirl.

I can’t see that many polka dots (and red) on the cover without thinking of Peter Arno’s March 23, 1935 New Yorker cover. It was also used as the cover for The Seventh New Yorker Album.

The dalmatians cover is perhaps overly familiar to me because it’s the front endpaper of my biography of Arno. Hey, what can I say? I like dogs…and Arno.

 

The Cartoonists and Cartoons

With the appearance of another team effort (third? fourth?) by Pia Guerra and Ian Boothby I think we’re in new territory as far as crediting a writing team goes for single panel cartoons in the magazine. Someone please correct me if there has been another duo credited beyond one or two appearances (Robert Crumb and Aline Kominsky-Crumb come to mind, but their work is in a different realm, i.e., their “thing” is not single panel cartoons). The duo of Guerra & Boothby have given us a slightly different take on the usual cartoonist’s representation of Noah’s Ark (the drawing appears on page 78). Instead of the long ramp leading up to the ark, it’s more of a tailgate.  It works well here.

Of note: Elisabeth McNair’s drawing of the tortoise and the hare (p. 72). If you remove the art hanging on the wall, and the door frame, the cartoon could easily be seen as descended from the school of (Charles) Barsotti minimalism. Love the turtle’s expression.

Also of note: Hilary Fitzgerald Cambell’s spooky “campfire” story-time drawing (p.49). At first glance I thought the scene was outdoors, but then saw the light sockets in the background with a charging electronic device (a phone?) connected to one of them. That it plays a trick on the eyes — intended or not — is pleasing, as is the drawing itself.

Further of note: Ed Steed adds another drawing to the cartoon canon of mounted something (in this case, someone) or others on the wall (p. 25).

Being the great grandson of bakers, and a fan of baked goods in general, it was a nice surprise  seeing pastries as a focus in Amy Hwang’s drawing (p. 43). Also a nice surprise: seeing Glen Baxter’s drawing (p.68). While a number of cartoonists box in their drawings, Baxter’s boxes somehow seem part of the drawing within, if that makes any sense (is the word “integral” — maybe, maybe not).

Rea Irvin’s Talk Masthead: Still not home. Read about it here.