The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of January 20, 2020

Random thoughts on the cartoons (and other stuff) in the latest issue of The New Yorker

The Cover: a portrait of Martin Luther King, Jr., by Diana Ejaita.  Read a Q&A with her here.

The Cartoonists:

The Cartoons:

Another issue with a healthy dose of cartoons, taking place in far and afield scenarios including a yoga class (courtesy of Lila Ash), an amphitheatre (by Brooke Bourgeois), an infested restaurant, (courtesy of Joe Dator), and a health and fitness club (courtesy of P.C. Vey).

The first cartoon in the issue is by Bruce Eric Kaplan — it’s a gem. Mr. Kaplan manages to convey a lot of information within his trademark rectangle with a broad vertical right bar. We’re shown just enough of the fallen giant; we can fill in the rest. The caption, as usual with Mr. Kaplan, is succinct —  “…dead giant” seals the deal.

Of the sixteen cartoons in the issue, one is a dual effort by Kaamran Hafeez & Al Batt. Their drawing closely recalls the structure of Peter Steiner’s famous New Yorker drawing of July 5, 1993, “On the Internet, nobody knows you’re a dog.” 

…Enjoyed Harry Bliss’s kid with a winged visitor cartoon (on page 35). I wonder though, if it’s already too late to close the sunroof (?).

… Suerynn Lee’s drawing (page 57) caught my attention. All the elements are there, including   excellent breathing room on the page.

…Johnny DiNapoli’s fun walrus drawing (on page 66) recalls Charles Barsotti’s simple and highly effective work.

The Rea Irvin Talk Masthead Watch: it was recently suggested to me that this ongoing Rea Irvin Masthead Watch is akin to tilting at windmills. To clarify the reference, here’s the relevant passage from Cervantes’ Don Quixote:

Just then they came in sight of thirty or forty windmills that rise from that plain. And no sooner did Don Quixote see them that he said to his squire, “Fortune is guiding our affairs better than we ourselves could have wished. Do you see over yonder, friend Sancho, thirty or forty hulking giants? I intend to do battle with them and slay them. With their spoils we shall begin to be rich for this is a righteous war and the removal of so foul a brood from off the face of the earth is a service God will bless.”

“What giants?” asked Sancho Panza.

“Those you see over there,” replied his master, “with their long arms. Some of them have arms well nigh two leagues in length.”

“Take care, sir,” cried Sancho. “Those over there are not giants but windmills. Those things that seem to be their arms are sails which, when they are whirled around by the wind, turn the millstone.”

…Hmmm, wow. Well, I don’t know. I never did well in lit classes. All I’m striving for is a return of Rea Irvin’s beautiful masthead. You can read more about that here.  Below is Mr. Irvin’s mothballed iconic design.

 

 

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of January 6, 2020

The Cover: A retro cover! When I saw this attractive cover I immediately placed its style and structure in the early 1960s, and thought of a particular artist: the most prolific of all New Yorker cover artists, Arthur Getz. To illustrate, here’s Mr. Getz’s cover from December 18, 1965 side-by-side with this new one by Pascal Campion.

The Cartoonists:

The Cartoons: Some random thoughts on a few of the cartoons in The New Yorker‘s first issue of the 2020s…

There’s a duo effort by Jose Arroyo and Rob Kutner. Mr. Arroyo first began contributing to the magazine in 2008. Mr. Kutner is a comedy writer.

Really like Suerynn Lee’s breadcrumbs-on-a-trail drawing (it’s on page 28) — graphically appealing with a strong caption. Of the breadcrumbs-on-a-trail themed New Yorker cartoons over the years, here’s a favorite from the great Arnie Levin, published May 22, 2000.

Zach Kanin’s mounted python (on p. 36) is a hoot (or a “ssssssss”).  Mr. Kanin’s drawings always seem (to me) to contain some kind of Charles Addamsy-ish dna, which is a very good thing.

Can’t see a dog at a computer cartoon, such as Elisabeth’s McNair’s (p. 34) without thinking of  Peter Steiner‘s celebrated New Yorker drawing published July 5, 1993:  “On the Internet, nobody knows you’re a dog.” It remains the most republished New Yorker drawing in modern history.

Joe Dator’s procrastinating writer cartoon (p. 39) is fun. The length of the caption — and the time it takes to read it —  becomes another element of delay.

The Rea Irvin Talk Masthead Watch: Last Monday, in this space, I held out the faint hope we might see Rea Irvin’s classic Talk masthead return to kick off the new year and decade. No dice. The redraw — plopped-in in the Spring of 2017 — is back after Ed Steed’s fun one-off in last week’s “Cartoon Takeover” issue.  Read more about the masthead here, and, as always (until something changes for the better… or worse!), here’s Mr. Irvin’s classic (sadly moth-balled) masthead…

 

Radio Interview Of Interest: Peter Steiner; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Peter Steiner, the cartoonist behind the cartoon above, talks to WAMC’s Joe Donahue about The Good Cop, Steiner’s latest novel. Link here to hear it.

Mr. Steiner’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Peter Steiner  Born, Cincinnati, 1940. New Yorker work: 1979 – . Collection: “I Didn’t Bite the Man, I Bit the Office” ( 1994).  Mr. Steiner is responsible for one of the most famous (and most republished) New Yorker cartoons in modern times, “On the Internet, nobody knows you’re a dog.” (published July 5, 1993).  An indication of its enduring popularity in our culture:  a wikipedia page is devoted to it.   He has also had novels published, as well as the limited edition “An Atheist in Heaven.” Website: www.plsteiner.com/

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

A newsy-ish David Sipress Daily.  Mr.Sipress has been contributing to The New Yorker since 1998.

Exhibit, Talk Of Interest: Peter Steiner; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon; Spiegelman At The Rockwell Museum

Exhibit,Talk Of Interest: Peter Steiner

You’re a lucky duck if you’re in Austria between October 3, 2019 and February 9, 2020 as you’ll be able to see an exhibit of work at the Karikaturmuseum in Krems by Peter Steiner, who drew the cartoon to the right — the  most reprinted New Yorker drawing in modern times. His work will be shown with Manfred Deix‘s under the heading “American v. Austrian Humor.”  Luckier still if you’re in Austria on October 5th. Mr. Steiner tells the Spill he’ll be in discussion on that date with the museum’s director “about the differences between here [the United States] and there [Austria], comparing my work with that of Manfred Deix.”

Info on the exhibit and discussion here (sorry, it’s not in English).

Peter Steiner’s entry on the Spill’s A-Z:

Born, Cincinnati, 1940. New Yorker work: 1979 – . Collection: “I Didn’t Bite the Man, I Bit the Office” ( 1994).  Mr. Steiner is responsible for one of the most famous (and most republished) New Yorker cartoons in modern times, “On the Internet, nobody knows you’re a dog.” (published July 5, 1993).  An indication of its enduring popularity in our culture:  a wikipedia page is devoted to it.   He has also had novels published, as well as the limited edition “An Atheist in Heaven.” Website: www.plsteiner.com/.

Here’s the Publishers Weekly review for Mr. Steiner’s latest book: The Good Cop 

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

T-shirts and attention spans by Emily Flake who has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2008. Visit her website here.

 

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Spiegelman At The Rockwell Museum

From the Norman Rockwell Museum website, August 6, 2019, “Rockwell Museum Hosts An Evening With Maus’s Art Spiegelman”

all the info here for the September 10th event. Mr. Spiegelman began contributing to The New Yorker in 1992.

 

 

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of July 29, 2019; Today’s Daily Cartoonist And Cartoon; A Julia Wertz Daily Shouts; Fave Photo Of The Day

The Cover:  I see destructive tourists at the core of this cover, yet destruction doesn’t come up in Joost Swarte’s interview with The New Yorker‘s art director, Francoise Mouly.  Odd?

The Cartoonists:

The Cartoons:

Almost a theme issue, of sorts:  Amy Hwang (cats), Roz Chast (dogs), Farley Katz (flamingos), Joe Duffy (pigs), Kendra Allenby (deer), Frank Cotham (a snake), Shannon Wheeler (snails), Hilary Fitzgerald Campbell (a rat).

Steering briefly away from the Spill‘s focus, I have to note that Salman Rushdie’s piece in the issue  is titled “The Little King” and the accompanying illustration (by Nico Schweitzer) is a play on Otto Soglow‘s famous character. The illustration seems even closer to the toy Little King than the drawing of the King :

 

 

Applause for Bob Eckstein‘s shuttlecock drawing on page 48, and Ellis Rosen‘s heralded fellow drawing on page 42.

 

From the Department of fun coincidences. Liana Finck’s lifeguard drawing (p. 33) immediately reminded me of an obscure original Lee Lorenz drawing hanging here at Spill headquarters. The Lorenz drawing (its barely legible caption: “Help!”) was not in The New Yorker.  I’ve yet to figure out where it was published, or how old it is.  Mr. Lorenz, visiting here and seeing the drawing, could not recall where it had appeared or its vintage. It appears to be in an earlier Lorenz style (but not the earliest), so we can at least place in an early-to-mid 1960s time frame.

Ms. Finck’s drawing and Mr. Lorenz’s are in some ways opposites of each other. Mr. Lorenz’s beach is overcrowded, while Ms. Finck’s beach is empty.  Ms. Finck’s life guard offers help (if helped); Mr. Lorenz’s life guard is crying out for help. What ties them together, at least for me, is the graphic core of each drawing: the exceptionally tall life guard stand. Fine fun work by both. 

Rea Irvin: Mr. Irvin’s iconic Talk masthead (below) left us in the Spring of 2017 after 92 years of service — it was replaced by a redraw.  Let’s hope the real thing returns before long.  Read about it here.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist And Cartoon

Brendan Loper makes good use of oven mitts. Mr. Loper began contributing to The New Yorker in 2016.

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A Julia Wertz Daily Shouts

“Conversations With Ma: Paint The Toenails And Board-Game Gripes” 

— A series? by Julia Wertz who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2015.

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Fave Photo Of The Day

A crowd of folks who draw got together yesterday in Rhinebeck, New York.  Left to right: myself, Peter Steiner, John Cuneo, R.O. Blechman, Liza Donnelly, Bill Plympton, Danny Shanahan and Elwood Smith.